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Old September 14th 04, 07:17 PM
Robin Birch
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Well, I've always been taught to make the transition to 45 degrees more
defined. The idea is to turn just before the landing area disappears
from view. This allows you to always see where you want to go and helps
to prevent you from going so far downwind that you won't get over the
boundary.

Keeping the landing zone in view allows you to more accurately judge if
you are too close or too far out (and make appropriate corrective
actions) and also to see if anyone is ahead of you in the circuit and/or
in your landing zone.

Robin

In message , Graeme Cant
writes
No. It's more like this:

------

--------
------
----
--
-
-
-
-
-
----------------------------

The base leg blends into downwind.

Graeme Cant


Mark James Boyd wrote:
Bruce Hoult wrote:

And why earth would you want to know that when you were in the
circuit? You are surely not going to go *that* far downwind that you
need best L/D into wind in order to get back.

Apparently this is a significant cause of crashes (undershot
landing from overshot downwind).
On another subject, can someone describe the
45/V type approach that I've heard is used in
some countries? Is it like this?
-------------------------------\
\
\
\
\
\
\
\
\
\
/
/
/
/
/
----------------- | /
| | /
| | | /
The Runway | --+----| ----/ | | |
| |
----------------- | --
------------+
Mark J. Boyd



--
Robin Birch
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