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Navy? C2/COD makes single engine, gear up landing.



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 16th 05, 12:28 AM
Dave S
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Default Navy? C2/COD makes single engine, gear up landing.

Just saw a video on local (Houston) news of a Grumman C2 making a belly
landing on a paved runway at Norfolk, VA. Over 25 souls on board,
everyone ok.

The left fan was turning, the right one was feathered. Apparently the
right engine failure prevented the gear from being extended. I would
have figured the military a/c would have the ability to extend the gear
inspite of an engine out.

Anyone familiar with the systems on these birds, and wether the right
engine is "critical" with regards to this function, or is there likely a
double failure of some kind (powerplant AND hydraulics).

Flaps were extended/down, but I am unsure if they were in full landing,
or approach setting, nor am I sure of how they are actuated.

Dave

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  #2  
Old August 16th 05, 02:01 AM
Bret Ludwig
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Most a/c have hydraulics on both engines PLUS a blowdown or bleed air
valve to provide emergency gear extension.

  #3  
Old August 16th 05, 03:19 AM
Doug Carter
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In article et, Dave S wrote:

The left fan was turning, the right one was feathered. Apparently the
right engine failure prevented the gear from being extended. I would
have figured the military a/c would have the ability to extend the gear
inspite of an engine out.


Perhaps they were saving the starboard engine from a tear down inspection.
  #4  
Old August 16th 05, 03:24 AM
Dave S
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Perhaps they were saving the starboard engine from a tear down
inspection.

The aircraft is a high wing twin. The props appear to clear the
ground... and the left one continued to operate quite briskly until
AFTER the landing.

I think the Navy would hang someone from the yardarm (if they still have
em) if someone stowed a perfectly good, taxpayer supplied turbine engine
with 25 passengers..

Dave

  #5  
Old August 16th 05, 03:51 AM
George Patterson
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Dave S wrote:

I think the Navy would hang someone from the yardarm (if they still have
em).....


Until the termites finish off the U.S.S. Constitution, the Navy will have quite
a few yardarms.

George Patterson
Give a person a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a person to
use the Internet and he won't bother you for weeks.
  #6  
Old August 16th 05, 03:58 AM
Skywise
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Dave S wrote in newsy9Me.7241$RS.2848
@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net:

Just saw a video on local (Houston) news of a Grumman C2 making a belly
landing on a paved runway at Norfolk, VA. Over 25 souls on board,
everyone ok.

The left fan was turning, the right one was feathered. Apparently the
right engine failure prevented the gear from being extended. I would
have figured the military a/c would have the ability to extend the gear
inspite of an engine out.

Anyone familiar with the systems on these birds, and wether the right
engine is "critical" with regards to this function, or is there likely a
double failure of some kind (powerplant AND hydraulics).

Flaps were extended/down, but I am unsure if they were in full landing,
or approach setting, nor am I sure of how they are actuated.

Dave


The way the story reads on CNN, the nose gear came down but not the
main. After circling and going through emergency procedures, the
nose gear was raised and one engine shut down for the belly landing.
The arresting hook was used to stop the plane upon landing.

It appears the only malfunction is with the main gear not coming
down.

Brian
--
http://www.skywise711.com - Lasers, Seismology, Astronomy, Skepticism

Seismic FAQ: http://www.skywise711.com/SeismicFAQ/SeismicFAQ.html
Blog: http://www.skywise711.com/Blog

Sed quis custodiet ipsos Custodes?
  #7  
Old August 16th 05, 04:06 AM
Jose
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After circling and going through emergency procedures, the
nose gear was raised and one engine shut down for the belly landing.
The arresting hook was used to stop the plane upon landing.


What advantage would this give?

Jose
--
Quantum Mechanics is like this: God =does= play dice with the universe,
except there's no God, and there's no dice. And maybe there's no universe.
for Email, make the obvious change in the address.
  #8  
Old August 16th 05, 04:12 AM
W P Dixon
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Could it be possible the one prop was turning and the other one was stopped
to help get rid of any excess speed? Just a thought.

Patrick
student SPL
aircraft structural mech

"George Patterson" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Dave S wrote:

I think the Navy would hang someone from the yardarm (if they still have
em).....


Until the termites finish off the U.S.S. Constitution, the Navy will have
quite a few yardarms.

George Patterson
Give a person a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a person to
use the Internet and he won't bother you for weeks.


  #9  
Old August 16th 05, 05:06 AM
Jose
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Save an engine, while still having power to adjust the approach

I'm more wondering about retracting the nose wheel. Seems the nose
wheel would prevent a prop strike and provide some ground steering.

Jose
--
Quantum Mechanics is like this: God =does= play dice with the universe,
except there's no God, and there's no dice. And maybe there's no universe.
for Email, make the obvious change in the address.
  #10  
Old August 16th 05, 05:58 AM
Morgans
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Default


"Jose" wrote

After circling and going through emergency procedures, the
nose gear was raised and one engine shut down for the belly landing.
The arresting hook was used to stop the plane upon landing.


What advantage would this give?


Save an engine, while still having power to adjust the approach, and using
the hook means you don't slide as far, chewing up the belly skins.
--
Jim in NC

 




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