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$75,000 2-33



 
 
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  #21  
Old March 8th 18, 05:29 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Bruce Hoult
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Default $75,000 2-33

On Wednesday, March 7, 2018 at 8:45:06 PM UTC-8, George Haeh wrote:
I'm not trading my 27B for it.

But it looks like it would be a stable instrument platform.


Certainly, even quite severe pitch excursions in IMC wouldn't trouble Vne.
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  #22  
Old March 8th 18, 05:37 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Charles Longley
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Posts: 74
Default $75,000 2-33

Polished turd comes to mind....
  #23  
Old March 8th 18, 05:56 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
sisu1a
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Posts: 567
Default $75,000 2-33

On Wednesday, March 7, 2018 at 1:13:42 PM UTC-8, Hartley Falbaum wrote:
On Wednesday, March 7, 2018 at 12:07:38 PM UTC-5, wrote:
Just when you thought you've seen it all. Wings and Wheels has listed a beautifully restored 2-33 for a mere $75K http://wingsandwheels.com/classifieds


Is it April First already? Wow!



Beware The Adds Of March
  #24  
Old March 8th 18, 05:19 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
kirk.stant
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Posts: 1,229
Default $75,000 2-33

What it really needs is an autopilot and cup holders.

Oh - and some fuzzy dice...

66
  #25  
Old March 8th 18, 07:59 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
CindyB[_2_]
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Posts: 118
Default $75,000 2-33

On Thursday, March 8, 2018 at 9:19:09 AM UTC-8, kirk.stant wrote:
What it really needs is an autopilot and cup holders.

Oh - and some fuzzy dice...

66


Guys, guys.... Geesh.
Can't you even give them credit for jacking up a data plate and making a gorgeous glider under it? The prep of the steel, the recover, the shiny-shiny paint in very tasteful colors. Fresh plexi and a complete smooth interior.. New Belts! A very professional looking wiring job and clean panel. At least this one looks like it won't have fabric fairing to the skid, and creating a fabric flash off on her first landing. (That's a true story.) Using the ballast tray area for a solid battery install that addresses CG.

I wouldn't be using all the electric stuff in the panel, but hey, as a systems trainer? At least I can see over the trainee's shoulder for what they're switching/changing, unlike an Arcus. And it will get you off the ground, unlike a Condor simulator.

So - just celebrate someone's nearly bottomless checkbook. And the anticipated return-to-service of a venerable machine. This set of tube-fuselage will likely be flying after I am wafting as ashes in the sky. And we should appreciate that.

Thanks, Caprock men. But, she's beyond my checkbook . . . .

Cindy
a 2-33 back-seater
  #26  
Old March 8th 18, 10:36 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Renny[_2_]
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Posts: 243
Default $75,000 2-33

On Thursday, March 8, 2018 at 12:59:24 PM UTC-7, CindyB wrote:
On Thursday, March 8, 2018 at 9:19:09 AM UTC-8, kirk.stant wrote:
What it really needs is an autopilot and cup holders.

Oh - and some fuzzy dice...

66


Guys, guys.... Geesh.
Can't you even give them credit for jacking up a data plate and making a gorgeous glider under it? The prep of the steel, the recover, the shiny-shiny paint in very tasteful colors. Fresh plexi and a complete smooth interior. New Belts! A very professional looking wiring job and clean panel. At least this one looks like it won't have fabric fairing to the skid, and creating a fabric flash off on her first landing. (That's a true story.) Using the ballast tray area for a solid battery install that addresses CG.

I wouldn't be using all the electric stuff in the panel, but hey, as a systems trainer? At least I can see over the trainee's shoulder for what they're switching/changing, unlike an Arcus. And it will get you off the ground, unlike a Condor simulator.

So - just celebrate someone's nearly bottomless checkbook. And the anticipated return-to-service of a venerable machine. This set of tube-fuselage will likely be flying after I am wafting as ashes in the sky. And we should appreciate that.

Thanks, Caprock men. But, she's beyond my checkbook . . . .

Cindy
a 2-33 back-seater


Now, now....Cindy....This is all done in good fun....and after all this is RAS! Did you expect anything different? Now, given the price of $75 large for a 2-33, I just cannot wait to see someone ask for $100K for a 1-26A!! ;-)

So, in conclusion, just when you think you have seen it all.....you have not!
  #27  
Old March 9th 18, 12:39 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Waveguru
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Posts: 82
Default $75,000 2-33

I wonder if you can run Condor on that screen and never need to leave the ground?

Boggs
  #28  
Old March 9th 18, 01:03 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
son_of_flubber
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Posts: 1,355
Default $75,000 2-33

This looks to be a remanufactured 2-33. I picture this:

They added up the cost of materials, hangar rent, utilities, insurance, and kept track of hours of labor spent. The supervised unskilled labor hours they charged at minimum wage. The skilled labor hours they charged at the prevailing rate. Add 5% a year for their 'cost of money', 5% for their trouble and they get an asking price of $75K. $75K +/- is what a remanufactured 2-33 costs.

This true cost of a remanufactured 2-33 tells me that a long term commitment to 2-33s is throwing good money after bad. You can remanufacture a 2-33 piecemeal, spread out of years, or all at once. Maintaining these birds only makes sense in the long run, when and where people donate hours and hours of their time. Sure that still happens and having trained in 2-33s, I'm grateful and appreciative of their generosity, but the people who have that amount of disposable time are ageing out. Most dads and moms nowadays want to spend their 'time off' with their kids and spouses, not in a hangar covered in dust. And speaking as a recently retired person myself, I have better things to do with my time. (In my defense, I've ponied up money to buy two semi-modern trainers for my club, and I volunteer time at my club.)

Now assuming you find people to donate the time to keep your 2-33 airworthy and cosmetically attractive, what do you get from a student's perspective? How much does a minute in the air cost in a 2-33 compare to a minute in the air in a semi-modern trainer like a ASK 21 or PW-6?

The 32:1 glide ratio is a tipping point. If there is lift to be found, a student can stay up for an hour (and learn to soar) in a 32:1 glider that has decent penetration. They can even fly downwind of the airport! Wow. Who knew?

In a 2-33... they had better find lift under the first cloud that they try. More often than not, they need to buy 2-3 tows to get an hour of practice in the air. On the plus side they get more practice at landing, but we all know that 'gaining altitude in lift' is the heroin that hooks us on the sport. If you want to reduce student attrition during training, put them in a ASK-21 or a PW-6.

If you're wanting a stream of students to subsidize club cash flow by buying lots and lots of tows, a 2-33 does a much better job at that than a 32:1 glider.


  #29  
Old March 9th 18, 01:06 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Darryl Ramm
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Posts: 2,142
Default $75,000 2-33

On Thursday, March 8, 2018 at 11:59:24 AM UTC-8, CindyB wrote:
On Thursday, March 8, 2018 at 9:19:09 AM UTC-8, kirk.stant wrote:
What it really needs is an autopilot and cup holders.

Oh - and some fuzzy dice...

66


Guys, guys.... Geesh.
Can't you even give them credit for jacking up a data plate and making a gorgeous glider under it? The prep of the steel, the recover, the shiny-shiny paint in very tasteful colors. Fresh plexi and a complete smooth interior. New Belts! A very professional looking wiring job and clean panel. At least this one looks like it won't have fabric fairing to the skid, and creating a fabric flash off on her first landing. (That's a true story.) Using the ballast tray area for a solid battery install that addresses CG.

I wouldn't be using all the electric stuff in the panel, but hey, as a systems trainer? At least I can see over the trainee's shoulder for what they're switching/changing, unlike an Arcus. And it will get you off the ground, unlike a Condor simulator.

So - just celebrate someone's nearly bottomless checkbook. And the anticipated return-to-service of a venerable machine. This set of tube-fuselage will likely be flying after I am wafting as ashes in the sky. And we should appreciate that.

Thanks, Caprock men. But, she's beyond my checkbook . . . .

Cindy
a 2-33 back-seater


I see a future SSA Convention talk with Cindy clicking though photos of glider panels in bad states. And asking the audience what upgrades they would do. "Hurry up make a decision, you are running out of budget..." and then "well this is what they did..." (murmurs of discontent, a few gasps).
  #30  
Old March 9th 18, 02:50 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
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Posts: 303
Default $75,000 2-33

The 2-33 in question is a unicorn and does not represent reality. Awesome that someone built it. Hilarious that they think there is someone in the world with 75K that shares their vision.
It is worth keeping 2-33s alive. They work, we have plenty of them, lots of clubs can't afford glass trainers. As for keeping them flying. If a guy can't ditch the wife and kids to rebuild a glider then he doesn't have the autonomy to be a soaring pilot. Wives don't value their husband's time by degrees, either he is serving her or himself.
Hour long training flights are overrated. Figure the time between first tow of the day and last. With ground handling/debriefing/pre briefing the next student how many club members can a glider serve in a day if they are all hour long flights?
Granted 2-33s suck in a lot of ways, but most of the problem is pilot vanity. What 2-33s need is a good marketing campaign. Paint shark noses on them or flame jobs, rename them the 'Pilotmaker.' Tell students that NASA trained the original astronauts in 2-33s. If 2-33s were the only gliders we had we'd have tons of fun with them.

On Thursday, March 8, 2018 at 8:03:02 PM UTC-5, son_of_flubber wrote:
This looks to be a remanufactured 2-33. I picture this:

They added up the cost of materials, hangar rent, utilities, insurance, and kept track of hours of labor spent. The supervised unskilled labor hours they charged at minimum wage. The skilled labor hours they charged at the prevailing rate. Add 5% a year for their 'cost of money', 5% for their trouble and they get an asking price of $75K. $75K +/- is what a remanufactured 2-33 costs.

This true cost of a remanufactured 2-33 tells me that a long term commitment to 2-33s is throwing good money after bad. You can remanufacture a 2-33 piecemeal, spread out of years, or all at once. Maintaining these birds only makes sense in the long run, when and where people donate hours and hours of their time. Sure that still happens and having trained in 2-33s, I'm grateful and appreciative of their generosity, but the people who have that amount of disposable time are ageing out. Most dads and moms nowadays want to spend their 'time off' with their kids and spouses, not in a hangar covered in dust. And speaking as a recently retired person myself, I have better things to do with my time. (In my defense, I've ponied up money to buy two semi-modern trainers for my club, and I volunteer time at my club.)

Now assuming you find people to donate the time to keep your 2-33 airworthy and cosmetically attractive, what do you get from a student's perspective? How much does a minute in the air cost in a 2-33 compare to a minute in the air in a semi-modern trainer like a ASK 21 or PW-6?

The 32:1 glide ratio is a tipping point. If there is lift to be found, a student can stay up for an hour (and learn to soar) in a 32:1 glider that has decent penetration. They can even fly downwind of the airport! Wow. Who knew?

In a 2-33... they had better find lift under the first cloud that they try. More often than not, they need to buy 2-3 tows to get an hour of practice in the air. On the plus side they get more practice at landing, but we all know that 'gaining altitude in lift' is the heroin that hooks us on the sport. If you want to reduce student attrition during training, put them in a ASK-21 or a PW-6.

If you're wanting a stream of students to subsidize club cash flow by buying lots and lots of tows, a 2-33 does a much better job at that than a 32:1 glider.


 




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