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visualisation of the lift distribution over a wing



 
 
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  #11  
Old November 29th 09, 01:07 AM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Brian Whatcott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 915
Default visualisation of the lift distribution over a wing

Stealth Pilot wrote:
/snip/ it is the air below pushing
you up that lifts the wing.
Stealth Pilot


In most circumstances, suction on the upper surface contributes about
2/3 rds of the lift, and pressure on the lower surface contributes about
1/3 rd.
That's one reason which rib stitching for rag wings is a biggy.

Brian W
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  #12  
Old November 29th 09, 03:12 AM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
cavelamb[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 257
Default visualisation of the lift distribution over a wing

brian whatcott wrote:
Stealth Pilot wrote:
/snip/ it is the air below pushing
you up that lifts the wing.
Stealth Pilot


In most circumstances, suction on the upper surface contributes about
2/3 rds of the lift, and pressure on the lower surface contributes about
1/3 rd.
That's one reason which rib stitching for rag wings is a biggy.

Brian W



At high angle of attach - maybe 1/3 on the bottom.
Especially along the leading edge.

At cruise, I believe the lower surface is closer to ambient pressure.

  #13  
Old November 29th 09, 03:16 AM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Alan Baker
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 244
Default visualisation of the lift distribution over a wing

In article ,
brian whatcott wrote:

Stealth Pilot wrote:
/snip/ it is the air below pushing
you up that lifts the wing.
Stealth Pilot


In most circumstances, suction on the upper surface contributes about
2/3 rds of the lift, and pressure on the lower surface contributes about
1/3 rd.
That's one reason which rib stitching for rag wings is a biggy.

Brian W


Ummmm...

It sort of depends what you mean.

If you mean that suction is actually providing an upward force, you're
quite mistaken.

If you mean that the difference in pressure between upper and lower
surfaces is 2/3 the result of lower pressure on the upper surface, then
you might be right. I don't know.

--
Alan Baker
Vancouver, British Columbia
http://gallery.me.com/alangbaker/100008/DSCF0162/web.jpg
  #14  
Old November 29th 09, 03:57 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Brian Whatcott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 915
Default visualisation of the lift distribution over a wing

Alan Baker wrote:
In article ,
brian whatcott wrote:

Stealth Pilot wrote:
/snip/ it is the air below pushing
you up that lifts the wing.
Stealth Pilot

In most circumstances, suction on the upper surface contributes about
2/3 rds of the lift, and pressure on the lower surface contributes about
1/3 rd.
That's one reason which rib stitching for rag wings is a biggy.

Brian W


Ummmm...

It sort of depends what you mean.

If you mean that suction is actually providing an upward force, you're
quite mistaken.

If you mean that the difference in pressure between upper and lower
surfaces is 2/3 the result of lower pressure on the upper surface, then
you might be right. I don't know.


Interesting comment: what would YOU call it when the fabric on the upper
wing surface wants to pull away from the ribs?

Brian W
  #15  
Old November 29th 09, 04:51 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Scott[_7_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 256
Default visualisation of the lift distribution over a wing

brian whatcott wrote:
Alan Baker wrote:
In article ,
brian whatcott wrote:

Stealth Pilot wrote:
/snip/ it is the air below pushing
you up that lifts the wing.
Stealth Pilot
In most circumstances, suction on the upper surface contributes about
2/3 rds of the lift, and pressure on the lower surface contributes
about 1/3 rd.
That's one reason which rib stitching for rag wings is a biggy.

Brian W


Ummmm...

It sort of depends what you mean.

If you mean that suction is actually providing an upward force, you're
quite mistaken.

If you mean that the difference in pressure between upper and lower
surfaces is 2/3 the result of lower pressure on the upper surface,
then you might be right. I don't know.


Interesting comment: what would YOU call it when the fabric on the upper
wing surface wants to pull away from the ribs?

Brian W


It's the "wind" blowing through the bottom surface, inflating the wing
like a balloon
  #16  
Old November 29th 09, 08:18 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Alan Baker
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 244
Default visualisation of the lift distribution over a wing

In article ,
brian whatcott wrote:

Alan Baker wrote:
In article ,
brian whatcott wrote:

Stealth Pilot wrote:
/snip/ it is the air below pushing
you up that lifts the wing.
Stealth Pilot
In most circumstances, suction on the upper surface contributes about
2/3 rds of the lift, and pressure on the lower surface contributes about
1/3 rd.
That's one reason which rib stitching for rag wings is a biggy.

Brian W


Ummmm...

It sort of depends what you mean.

If you mean that suction is actually providing an upward force, you're
quite mistaken.

If you mean that the difference in pressure between upper and lower
surfaces is 2/3 the result of lower pressure on the upper surface, then
you might be right. I don't know.


Interesting comment: what would YOU call it when the fabric on the upper
wing surface wants to pull away from the ribs?


Air pressure from inside the wing pushing up on it more than the air
above is pushing down...

--
Alan Baker
Vancouver, British Columbia
http://gallery.me.com/alangbaker/100008/DSCF0162/web.jpg
  #17  
Old November 30th 09, 12:17 AM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Morgans[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,924
Default visualisation of the lift distribution over a wing


"Alan Baker" wrote

Air pressure from inside the wing pushing up on it more than the air
above is pushing down...


I hope you are pulling someone's leg, and that your are not that inept in
the field of aerodynamics and physics.
--
Jim in NC


  #18  
Old November 30th 09, 12:29 AM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Alan Baker
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 244
Default visualisation of the lift distribution over a wing

In article ,
"Morgans" wrote:

"Alan Baker" wrote

Air pressure from inside the wing pushing up on it more than the air
above is pushing down...


I hope you are pulling someone's leg, and that your are not that inept in
the field of aerodynamics and physics.


No, I'm quite serious.

The reduction in *pressure* on the upper surface of the wing cannot
produce any force except downward. A perfect vacuum over the entire
upper surface wouldn't produce any upward force, but simply *zero*
force; allowing the upward force on the lower surface to act alone.

Anyone who thinks that the pressure of a fluid on a surface can act in
any direction but towards the surface is simply wrong.

--
Alan Baker
Vancouver, British Columbia
http://gallery.me.com/alangbaker/100008/DSCF0162/web.jpg
  #19  
Old November 30th 09, 01:19 AM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Brian Whatcott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 915
Default visualisation of the lift distribution over a wing

Alan Baker wrote:


Interesting comment: what would YOU call it when the fabric on the upper
wing surface wants to pull away from the ribs?


Air pressure from inside the wing pushing up on it more than the air
above is pushing down...



Let me take a wild guess he you did physics for an uundergraduate
degree. Is that right?

Brian W
  #20  
Old November 30th 09, 02:19 AM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Steve Hix[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 50
Default visualisation of the lift distribution over a wing

In article ,
brian whatcott wrote:

Alan Baker wrote:


Interesting comment: what would YOU call it when the fabric on the upper
wing surface wants to pull away from the ribs?


Air pressure from inside the wing pushing up on it more than the air
above is pushing down...


For a couple of seconds, perhaps.

Wings aren't typically hermetically sealed.

Let me take a wild guess he you did physics for an uundergraduate
degree. Is that right?

Brian W

 




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