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Effect of Light Sport on General Aviation



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 21st 03, 04:53 AM
Gilan
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Default Effect of Light Sport on General Aviation

I think you haven't seen that many message threads on SP/LSA because they
get so heated like discussions on religion or politics. Maybe folks are
burned out arguing over the subject. Of course there really isn't anything
to argue about. I think the new LSA will be a good thing and have a message
group dedicated to just that subject.
--
Have a good day and stay out of the trees!
See ya on Sport Aircraft group
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sport_Aircraft/



Florida Flying Gators
http://www.flyinggators.com



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  #2  
Old September 21st 03, 04:34 PM
Jay Honeck
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I think you haven't seen that many message threads on SP/LSA because they
get so heated like discussions on religion or politics.


Anything that expands General Aviation at the "Joe Lunchbox" level is a good
thing, IMHO.

With the passing of the World War II generation, we're losing the pilot
population. If we don't make flying more affordable and available --
soon -- the infrastructure of G.A. will continue to crumble beneath our
feet.
--
Jay Honeck
Iowa City, IA
Pathfinder N56993
www.AlexisParkInn.com
"Your Aviation Destination"


  #3  
Old September 21st 03, 05:50 PM
RobertR237
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In article . net, "Gilan"
writes:


I think you haven't seen that many message threads on SP/LSA because they
get so heated like discussions on religion or politics. Maybe folks are
burned out arguing over the subject. Of course there really isn't anything
to argue about. I think the new LSA will be a good thing and have a message
group dedicated to just that subject.
--
Have a good day and stay out of the trees!
See ya on Sport Aircraft group
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Sport_Aircraft/



Florida Flying Gators
http://www.flyinggators.com



It's time to just wait and see. If it happens then we will see what sort of
results will come of it.


Bob Reed
www.kisbuild.r-a-reed-assoc.com (KIS Builders Site)
KIS Cruiser in progress...Slow but steady progress....

"Ladies and Gentlemen, take my advice,
pull down your pants and Slide on the Ice!"
(M.A.S.H. Sidney Freedman)

  #5  
Old September 21st 03, 07:48 PM
RobertR237
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In article , "James M. Knox"
writes:


It's time to just wait and see. If it happens then we will see what
sort of results will come of it.


I asked Phil Boyer what he thought of it, namely would it help attract new
pilots. He said essentially no, he expected pretty close to zero (and
admittedly any is better than none) new pilots.

What he *did* expect, and was pleased with, was an increase in the total
number of active pilots from passage of SLA. These would come from
returning pilots who had lost their medical, plus additional retention of
the older pilot population as they keep flying longer.

As you say, we'll see.

-----------------------------------------------
James M. Knox


That is the same benefit that I have seen coming out of SA but it could make
getting into flying a little cheaper which could also be a plus.

Bob Reed
www.kisbuild.r-a-reed-assoc.com (KIS Builders Site)
KIS Cruiser in progress...Slow but steady progress....

"Ladies and Gentlemen, take my advice,
pull down your pants and Slide on the Ice!"
(M.A.S.H. Sidney Freedman)

  #7  
Old September 21st 03, 11:40 PM
Brent Rehmel
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"James M. Knox" wrote in message
I asked Phil Boyer what he thought of it, namely would it help attract new
pilots. He said essentially no, he expected pretty close to zero (and
admittedly any is better than none) new pilots.


I don't know. I would think that being able to buy a brand new Zodiac 601
XL, ready-to-fly for $42,500 would be welcome news to flight schools. The
Rotax engine will also burn 90 octane mogas which should be welcome as well.
The Zodiac has aluminum skin and can be tied down, rather than hangared; it
should work almost identically to a Piper Tomahawk for less money. Perhaps
this could translate to more introductory rides and perhaps to a larger
rental fleet.

I think this could compliment local EAA chapters since this same plane can
be assembled from a kit. The really nice part of this is that with Light
Sport, the kit could be more than 49% assembled by the factory. With more
complete assembly and higher volumes, the cost could also drop a bit as
efficiency would increase.


  #8  
Old September 22nd 03, 02:42 AM
Morgans
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"sleepy6" wrote

Interesting that you are so positive in your decision when you can't be
sure what the requirements will be until the final version is
published

What happens if the DOT inserts the medical requirements like they did
for Rec pilot?

It makes sense to see the final version BEFORE you invest any time or
money in Sport Pilot.


Definitely. I just really really hope that it goes my way.

Interestingly, about the time it comes into being, I may finally be able to
get a medical. My back surgery seems to be successful, but the recovery is
long. That was the only thing standing in my way.
--
Jim in NC


  #9  
Old September 22nd 03, 02:38 PM
James M. Knox
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"Brent Rehmel" wrote in
news:dNpbb.540612$o%[email protected]:

I don't know. I would think that being able to buy a brand new Zodiac
601 XL, ready-to-fly for $42,500 would be welcome news to flight
schools. The Rotax engine will also burn 90 octane mogas which should
be welcome as well. The Zodiac has aluminum skin and can be tied down,
rather than hangared; it should work almost identically to a Piper
Tomahawk for less money. Perhaps this could translate to more
introductory rides and perhaps to a larger rental fleet.


Hopefully you will be correct. A significant part of the per hour cost of
a rental is the "return on investment" - especially for the rare school
that has nicer looking (newer) planes.

It's not entirely clear yet exactly how all this could translate for those
pursuing a regular PP-ASEL. For example, could you do all your training in
a Zodiac certificated under Light Sport but still get a regular PP ticket?

-----------------------------------------------
James M. Knox
TriSoft ph 512-385-0316
1109-A Shady Lane fax 512-366-4331
Austin, Tx 78721
-----------------------------------------------
  #10  
Old September 22nd 03, 06:43 PM
Brent Rehmel
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"James M. Knox" wrote in message
...

It's not entirely clear yet exactly how all this could translate for those
pursuing a regular PP-ASEL. For example, could you do all your training

in
a Zodiac certificated under Light Sport but still get a regular PP ticket?


Yes, you can. The main distinction is the Instructor's rating. You can train
in a Light Sport aircraft under a Light Sport instructor and get a Light
Sport Pilot's License. However, if your instructor has a regular instructor
rating then the aircraft is promoted and counted the same as a certified
aircraft; you could get a full PP License from a regular instructor in a
Light Sport aircraft. If your instructor only has a Light Sport instructor
rating he can only train in Light Sport aircraft and you can only get a
Light Sport license from him.

However, even if you train under a Light Sport Instructor, there is nothing
to stop you from adding the extra hours and extending your rating to a full
Private Pilots License. Basically, all of your flight hours from Light Sport
count toward a PP License. There would be some additional ground school and
a little more instructor time (with a regular instructor) since Light Sport
does not include night flying or landing at controlled airports. You would
also need a medical since Light Sport doesn't require this. In other words,
most people solo in 10 - 20 hours and then need to fly additional hours to
have 40 before they can get a PP License. If you had 40 hours logged flight
time under Light Sport then you would only need the extra instruction but
not additional flight time to get a PP License.

The reason this is significant is because in the past we have had only two
kinds of aircraft: certified and experimental. I don't believe you are
allowed to do instruction in an experimental, but even if you can, this
wouldn't be practical anyway since a flight school would have to asemble 51%
of each aircraft. In contrast, Light Sport becomes a third classification;
you can buy a non-certified Light Sport aircraft already assembled and
flyable. And, you are allowed to do instruction in this aircraft.
Interestingly enough, some of the characteristics of Light Sport aircraft
get promoted depending on the Pilot's rating. So, for example, a Light Sport
pilot flying a Light Sport aircraft cannot fly at night, however, if the
pilot has a PP license then the aircraft can. In other words, the aircraft
is limited by the pilot's rating, with a PP License you can treat the
aircraft the same as a certified aircraft.

This should provide exactly what we need which is a step in between
ultralights and certified aircraft. For example, right now, ultralight time
counts for nothing. However, many ultralights could be designated Light
Sport and the time could actually be logged after some intial Instructor
time. Yes, there is a distinction between weight shift and regular control;
you could not, for example, obtain a Light Sport License with only weight
shift time and then fly regular aircraft, you would need time and an
instructor endorsement similar to a type rating.


 




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