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Torque Wrench Calibration



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 25th 09, 07:39 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
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Posts: 9
Default Torque Wrench Calibration

I was getting ready to install a replacement manifold on the old Mercury
and it occurred to me I ought to be pretty sure my torque wrench didn't
strip the aluminum threads. The Snap On dial wrench hasn't been
recalibrated for 30 years and the Craftsman torsion bar wrench is too
clumsy to get to some of the bolts. I was kicking it around and I came
up with using the torsion bar wrench on a bicycle axle nut and then
putting the dial wrench on it to see if the reading matched. It did.
Then, I went ahead and checked the Craftsman clicker wrench of the same
vintage and recalibrating, and it came up with a match also. Then I did
the torquing with the dial wrench and cross checked it with the torsion
bar wrench, with all good readings. So, I'm just going to call them
calibrated.
Andy
Phoenix

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  #3  
Old June 29th 09, 05:53 AM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Bill
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Posts: 45
Default Torque Wrench Calibration

Make it so that you can pull the torsion bar wrench with the snap on--
against each other. They should read the same.

How could the torsion wrench be off if it zeros properly and nothing
in the ponter binds?

Bill Hale Loveland CO


On Jun 25, 12:39*pm, wrote:
I was getting ready to install a replacement manifold on the old Mercury
and it occurred to me I ought to be pretty sure my torque wrench didn't
strip the aluminum threads. *The Snap On dial wrench hasn't been
recalibrated for 30 years and the Craftsman torsion bar wrench is too
clumsy to get to some of the bolts. *I was kicking it around and I came
up with using the torsion bar wrench on a bicycle axle nut and then
putting the dial wrench on it to see if the reading matched. *It did.
Then, I went ahead and checked the Craftsman clicker wrench of the same
vintage and recalibrating, and it came up with a match also. *Then I did
the torquing with the dial wrench and cross checked it with the torsion
bar wrench, with all good readings. *So, I'm just going to call them
calibrated.
Andy
Phoenix


  #4  
Old June 29th 09, 04:26 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Tim[_8_]
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Posts: 27
Default Torque Wrench Calibration


wrote in message
...
I was getting ready to install a replacement manifold on the old Mercury
and it occurred to me I ought to be pretty sure my torque wrench didn't
strip the aluminum threads. The Snap On dial wrench hasn't been
recalibrated for 30 years and the Craftsman torsion bar wrench is too
clumsy to get to some of the bolts. I was kicking it around and I came
up with using the torsion bar wrench on a bicycle axle nut and then
putting the dial wrench on it to see if the reading matched. It did.
Then, I went ahead and checked the Craftsman clicker wrench of the same
vintage and recalibrating, and it came up with a match also. Then I did
the torquing with the dial wrench and cross checked it with the torsion
bar wrench, with all good readings. So, I'm just going to call them
calibrated.
Andy
Phoenix


You might check around for a lab. A phone call to these guys indicate rates
of $35 to $55.
http://www.teamtorque.com/index.html


  #5  
Old June 29th 09, 05:20 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Stu Fields
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Posts: 87
Default Torque Wrench Calibration


wrote in message
...
I was getting ready to install a replacement manifold on the old Mercury
and it occurred to me I ought to be pretty sure my torque wrench didn't
strip the aluminum threads. The Snap On dial wrench hasn't been
recalibrated for 30 years and the Craftsman torsion bar wrench is too
clumsy to get to some of the bolts. I was kicking it around and I came
up with using the torsion bar wrench on a bicycle axle nut and then
putting the dial wrench on it to see if the reading matched. It did.
Then, I went ahead and checked the Craftsman clicker wrench of the same
vintage and recalibrating, and it came up with a match also. Then I did
the torquing with the dial wrench and cross checked it with the torsion
bar wrench, with all good readings. So, I'm just going to call them
calibrated.
Andy
Phoenix


Calibration can be like measuring with a micrometer and cutting with an axe.
Unbrako says that torque wrench accuracy for generating the clamping force
is +/- 25%.
For a 100 in-# set click you could be providing 75 or 125in-# instead. How
close a calibration to "truth" is needed?

Stu


  #6  
Old June 29th 09, 05:35 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
[email protected][_2_]
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Posts: 33
Default Torque Wrench Calibration

On Jun 29, 10:20*am, "Stu Fields" wrote:

Calibration can be like measuring with a micrometer and cutting with an axe.
Unbrako says that torque wrench accuracy for generating the clamping force
is +/- 25%.
Stu


True, clamping force and "torque" are not always a direct
relationship. Thus the use of Torque-n-Turn specs (and other methods
of overcoming thread friction). I've never seen any specs for AN
hardware other than simple torque values. Do Torque-n-Turn specs
exist for AN hardware? Yes, I know that AN hardware isn't "torque to
yield" but the method is still of value for reusable fasteners.
=================
Leon McAtee

  #7  
Old June 29th 09, 06:25 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
jerry wass
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Posts: 180
Default Torque Wrench Calibration

Bill wrote:
Make it so that you can pull the torsion bar wrench with the snap on--
against each other. They should read the same.

How could the torsion wrench be off if it zeros properly and nothing
in the ponter binds?

Bill Hale Loveland CO


You are correct for a bending rod type wrench--but some torque wrenches
have a spring loaded(adjustable)hollow handle that allows a piece to pop
out of a Vee notch making an audible click that is also felt in the
handle--(very handy for torquing where you can't see the dial or
pointer. Jerry


On Jun 25, 12:39 pm, wrote:
I was getting ready to install a replacement manifold on the old Mercury
and it occurred to me I ought to be pretty sure my torque wrench didn't
strip the aluminum threads. The Snap On dial wrench hasn't been
recalibrated for 30 years and the Craftsman torsion bar wrench is too
clumsy to get to some of the bolts. I was kicking it around and I came
up with using the torsion bar wrench on a bicycle axle nut and then
putting the dial wrench on it to see if the reading matched. It did.
Then, I went ahead and checked the Craftsman clicker wrench of the same
vintage and recalibrating, and it came up with a match also. Then I did
the torquing with the dial wrench and cross checked it with the torsion
bar wrench, with all good readings. So, I'm just going to call them
calibrated.
Andy
Phoenix


  #8  
Old June 29th 09, 11:12 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Dan[_12_]
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Posts: 451
Default Torque Wrench Calibration

Jerry Wass wrote:
Bill wrote:
Make it so that you can pull the torsion bar wrench with the snap on--
against each other. They should read the same.

How could the torsion wrench be off if it zeros properly and nothing
in the ponter binds?

Bill Hale Loveland CO


You are correct for a bending rod type wrench--but some torque wrenches
have a spring loaded(adjustable)hollow handle that allows a piece to pop
out of a Vee notch making an audible click that is also felt in the
handle--(very handy for torquing where you can't see the dial or
pointer. Jerry


In the Air Farce we were supposed to click the break type torque
wrench three times at the lowest setting before using it. This was
supposed to spread the lubrication inside.

I like the idea of taking the wrench to a shop to check calibration.
Having said that, in my first shop in the USAF we calibrated torque
wrenches so I may be a tad biased. The machine we used was huge and
probably weighed close to a ton. Torque wrenches in the USAF are
periodically calibrated, I forget the cycle, and taken in for
calibration if dropped or abused.

I wonder if the electronic torque wrenches are worth the money. Has
anyone in RAH tried them?

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
  #9  
Old June 30th 09, 02:44 AM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Peter Dohm
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Posts: 1,754
Default Torque Wrench Calibration

"Dan" wrote in message
...
Jerry Wass wrote:
Bill wrote:
Make it so that you can pull the torsion bar wrench with the snap on--
against each other. They should read the same.

How could the torsion wrench be off if it zeros properly and nothing
in the ponter binds?

Bill Hale Loveland CO


You are correct for a bending rod type wrench--but some torque wrenches
have a spring loaded(adjustable)hollow handle that allows a piece to pop
out of a Vee notch making an audible click that is also felt in the
handle--(very handy for torquing where you can't see the dial or pointer.
Jerry


In the Air Farce we were supposed to click the break type torque wrench
three times at the lowest setting before using it. This was supposed to
spread the lubrication inside.

I like the idea of taking the wrench to a shop to check calibration.
Having said that, in my first shop in the USAF we calibrated torque
wrenches so I may be a tad biased. The machine we used was huge and
probably weighed close to a ton. Torque wrenches in the USAF are
periodically calibrated, I forget the cycle, and taken in for calibration
if dropped or abused.

I wonder if the electronic torque wrenches are worth the money. Has
anyone in RAH tried them?

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired


I have not tried the electronic variety; but my recollection is that the
click type torque wrenches were supposed to be calibrated annualy--so long
as no incident occured, such as dropping or other abuse.

Peter



  #10  
Old June 30th 09, 04:53 AM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
coffelt2
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Posts: 204
Default Torque Wrench Calibration

snip
In the Air Farce we were supposed to click the break type torque wrench
three times at the lowest setting before using it. This was supposed to
spread the lubrication inside.

I like the idea of taking the wrench to a shop to check calibration.
Having said that, in my first shop in the USAF we calibrated torque
wrenches so I may be a tad biased. The machine we used was huge and
probably weighed close to a ton. Torque wrenches in the USAF are
periodically calibrated, I forget the cycle, and taken in for calibration
if dropped or abused.

snip
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired


Heck, Dan, in the Air Force there was an alternate torque measuring
system that didn't even require a torque wrench. (PMEL calibrated, of
course)
Simply "strip" it and back off one half turn. Farm boys from Georgia taught
me that.

Old Chief Lynn

 




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