A aviation & planes forum. AviationBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » AviationBanter forum » rec.aviation newsgroups » Rotorcraft
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Gyro question



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old December 20th 04, 05:27 PM
news.starpower.net
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Gyro question

I have a question:
(and the answer may be pretty basic)
We all know that you can't land a gyrocopter in a crab angle because you
might tip over. Why, then, don't they use castor type wheels, or some other
wheel setup where all wheels can swivel in any direction? I think that this
would allow the craft to roll in the direction of the momentum preventing
tipping over, but would it completely eliminate handling on the ground?
Could the rudder alone be enough to steer on the ground?

-Just wondering


Ads
  #2  
Old December 21st 04, 03:15 AM
Peter Wendell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

news.starpower.net wrote:
I have a question:
(and the answer may be pretty basic)
We all know that you can't land a gyrocopter in a crab angle because you
might tip over. Why, then, don't they use castor type wheels, or some other
wheel setup where all wheels can swivel in any direction? I think that this
would allow the craft to roll in the direction of the momentum preventing
tipping over, but would it completely eliminate handling on the ground?
Could the rudder alone be enough to steer on the ground?

-Just wondering



Some gyroplanes do have a castering, or semi-castering front wheel, of
course the mains don't castor, but why would you need them to? A x-wind
landing in a gyro is not much different from one in an airplane. You
apply cyclic into the wind to eliminate drift, and use rudder to align
the nose with the runway. If the x-wind component excedes your limits,
you can land on a taxiway, if permitted, or line up on a diagonal
approach to the runway, or choose an alternate airport. Experienced gyro
pilots can land accross most runways, if necessary. It is always a good
idea to carry a bit more power when making a landing in a significant
x-wind. It makes a go-around easier, and provides you with a little more
time to get straightened out if caught by a gust.
  #3  
Old December 21st 04, 04:01 AM
news.starpower.net
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Yeah, I know, it's kind of a silly question.

"Peter Wendell" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
news.starpower.net wrote:
I have a question:
(and the answer may be pretty basic)
We all know that you can't land a gyrocopter in a crab angle because you
might tip over. Why, then, don't they use castor type wheels, or some
other wheel setup where all wheels can swivel in any direction? I think
that this would allow the craft to roll in the direction of the momentum
preventing tipping over, but would it completely eliminate handling on
the ground? Could the rudder alone be enough to steer on the ground?

-Just wondering


Some gyroplanes do have a castering, or semi-castering front wheel, of
course the mains don't castor, but why would you need them to? A x-wind
landing in a gyro is not much different from one in an airplane. You apply
cyclic into the wind to eliminate drift, and use rudder to align the nose
with the runway. If the x-wind component excedes your limits, you can land
on a taxiway, if permitted, or line up on a diagonal approach to the
runway, or choose an alternate airport. Experienced gyro pilots can land
accross most runways, if necessary. It is always a good idea to carry a
bit more power when making a landing in a significant x-wind. It makes a
go-around easier, and provides you with a little more time to get
straightened out if caught by a gust.



  #4  
Old December 21st 04, 04:47 AM
Peter Wendell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

news.starpower.net wrote:
Yeah, I know, it's kind of a silly question.

"Peter Wendell" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

news.starpower.net wrote:

I have a question:
(and the answer may be pretty basic)
We all know that you can't land a gyrocopter in a crab angle because you
might tip over. Why, then, don't they use castor type wheels, or some
other wheel setup where all wheels can swivel in any direction? I think
that this would allow the craft to roll in the direction of the momentum
preventing tipping over, but would it completely eliminate handling on
the ground? Could the rudder alone be enough to steer on the ground?

-Just wondering


Some gyroplanes do have a castering, or semi-castering front wheel, of
course the mains don't castor, but why would you need them to? A x-wind
landing in a gyro is not much different from one in an airplane. You apply
cyclic into the wind to eliminate drift, and use rudder to align the nose
with the runway. If the x-wind component excedes your limits, you can land
on a taxiway, if permitted, or line up on a diagonal approach to the
runway, or choose an alternate airport. Experienced gyro pilots can land
accross most runways, if necessary. It is always a good idea to carry a
bit more power when making a landing in a significant x-wind. It makes a
go-around easier, and provides you with a little more time to get
straightened out if caught by a gust.





There aren't any silly questions I'm happy to answer any questions
about gyroplane flight operations. Many people are confused about how
they are actually flown and there really aren't many gyro pilots out there.
  #5  
Old December 21st 04, 10:29 PM
Dikkie Dik
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Many gyros have a prerotator. That is a link between the engine and the
rotor so the rotor can be sped up before you start the take-off run. For
this prerotator you want wheels with brakes and no swivel to take the
resulting moment (there's no tail rotor to take it). Other gyro designs
might not have a prerotator, but have the undercarriage layout anyway so
a prerotator can be installed later on.

The rotor brake actually gives you similar problems if you have
swivelling wheels.

news.starpower.net wrote:

I have a question:
(and the answer may be pretty basic)
We all know that you can't land a gyrocopter in a crab angle because you
might tip over. Why, then, don't they use castor type wheels, or some other
wheel setup where all wheels can swivel in any direction? I think that this
would allow the craft to roll in the direction of the momentum preventing
tipping over, but would it completely eliminate handling on the ground?
Could the rudder alone be enough to steer on the ground?

-Just wondering


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Vacuum Gyro Question Jim Carriere Home Built 15 January 22nd 05 03:04 AM
VOR/DME Approach Question Chip Jones Instrument Flight Rules 47 August 29th 04 05:03 AM
Newbie Question - Vacuum vs Electric Bill Denton Aerobatics 1 April 15th 04 11:30 PM
Legal question - Pilot liability and possible involvement with a crime John Piloting 5 November 20th 03 09:40 PM
Question about Question 4488 [email protected] Instrument Flight Rules 3 October 27th 03 01:26 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:06 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 AviationBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.