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Is an LDA w/GS a "Precision" approach?



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 29th 14, 09:48 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
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Posts: 1
Default Is an LDA w/GS a "Precision" approach?

On Sunday, September 5, 1999 3:00:00 AM UTC-4, David Stocker wrote:
I'm based in ROA and last flew the LDA 6 approach a couple of days ago. It's a
very interesting example (see plate at
http://rev.net/~stockerd/images/Aviation/ROA_LDA_6.pdf). The straight-in
LDA 6 has the lowest minimums of any approach at ROA, including the
straight-in ILS 33! (364 vs. 500 AGL) All approaches at ROA have higher than
normal minimums due to terrain restrictions for the missed approach. LDA 6 is
offset from the runway heading by about 13 deg. due to a mountain approx. 2800
AGL on the runway heading.

I was in the tower one night watching the airliners break out near minimums
and make the honker turn required to land. Impressive! Not too long ago I
was on a US 737 which missed on this approach during rain showers -- made it
on the second try. I would think that that relatively low minimum, required
turn and runway length (6800) make this one of the toughest approaches
routinely flown by the airlines on the East Coast.

For me, this approach settles the "can I descend on the GS before I'm
established on the localizer" debate. Do that on this approach and you'll
likely hit a granite cloud -- note that ridges on both sides as shown on the
plate (3375 MSL on the left, 4011 on the right).

My answer to the interview question would be "If straight-in it's a precision
approach, otherwise it's not."

Dave Stocker

PP-ASEL-IA, PA28-181, N8331C

Garner Miller wrote:

OK, I'm in need of some 100% trivial information. I have a friend
going for an airline interview next week, and rumor has it they're
going to whip out an approach plate with an "LDA with Glideslope"
approach.

Nothing really unusual about such a beast... it's basically just an ILS
offset from the runway by more than a couple degrees, and [other than
turning before you land] is flown the same way, complete with a
Decision Altitude (DA) vs. an MDA. In this case, I think it'll
probably be the one to Runway 6 in Roanoke, VA (ROA).

The tricky part: I hear the question will be, "Is this a precision
approach?"

[...snip...]


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  #2  
Old May 30th 14, 01:51 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Sam Spade
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Posts: 1,324
Default Is an LDA w/GS a "Precision" approach?

On 5/29/2014 1:48 PM, wrote:
On Sunday, September 5, 1999 3:00:00 AM UTC-4, David Stocker wrote:
I'm based in ROA and last flew the LDA 6 approach a couple of days ago. It's a
very interesting example (see plate at
http://rev.net/~stockerd/images/Aviation/ROA_LDA_6.pdf). The straight-in
LDA 6 has the lowest minimums of any approach at ROA, including the
straight-in ILS 33! (364 vs. 500 AGL) All approaches at ROA have higher than
normal minimums due to terrain restrictions for the missed approach. LDA 6 is
offset from the runway heading by about 13 deg. due to a mountain approx. 2800
AGL on the runway heading.

I was in the tower one night watching the airliners break out near minimums
and make the honker turn required to land. Impressive! Not too long ago I
was on a US 737 which missed on this approach during rain showers -- made it
on the second try. I would think that that relatively low minimum, required
turn and runway length (6800) make this one of the toughest approaches
routinely flown by the airlines on the East Coast.

For me, this approach settles the "can I descend on the GS before I'm
established on the localizer" debate. Do that on this approach and you'll
likely hit a granite cloud -- note that ridges on both sides as shown on the
plate (3375 MSL on the left, 4011 on the right).

My answer to the interview question would be "If straight-in it's a precision
approach, otherwise it's not."

Dave Stocker

PP-ASEL-IA, PA28-181, N8331C

Garner Miller wrote:

OK, I'm in need of some 100% trivial information. I have a friend
going for an airline interview next week, and rumor has it they're
going to whip out an approach plate with an "LDA with Glideslope"
approach.

Nothing really unusual about such a beast... it's basically just an ILS
offset from the runway by more than a couple degrees, and [other than
turning before you land] is flown the same way, complete with a
Decision Altitude (DA) vs. an MDA. In this case, I think it'll
probably be the one to Runway 6 in Roanoke, VA (ROA).

The tricky part: I hear the question will be, "Is this a precision
approach?"

[...snip...]


Wow! 1999. The site is once again alive!
 




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