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Epidemic of cracked windshields in KDEN, explanation unknown



 
 
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  #21  
Old February 18th 07, 11:17 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air
Crash Lander[_1_]
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Posts: 233
Default Epidemic of cracked windshields in KDEN, explanation unknown

"CRaSH" wrote in message
...
Metal screens in front of your windshield (windscreen) and headlights were
a common sight............


You never (rarely) see them now days, since the introduction of the
laminated windscreen. The weather is doing silly things though. The last 2
days, we had 38 degrees Celsius, and yet today, we're having 23 degrees
Celsius, and it's raining!
Oz/Crash Lander


Ads
  #22  
Old February 19th 07, 03:27 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air
[email protected]
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Default Epidemic of cracked windshields in KDEN, explanation unknown

On Feb 17, 5:07 pm, Blanche wrote:
Winds on Thursday & Friday reached over 100 mph in the foothills.
We don't use salt, as a rule, on the roads. Ice slicer and a
combination of fine rocks. Add to this the everyday, run-of-the-mill
rocks and gravel kicked up on the roads, and it's normal to replace
the windshields every 2-4 years (I'm due this year. Last change
was in 2004). Get these winds, a few hefty rocks, and
a new windshield sooner than expected.

KDEN is surrounded by empty fields (for the most part), which means
lots of "stuff" in the area that is kicked up by the winds.


Boulder is a town just north of Denver, right at the foothills, which
are steep and abrupt.
Sometime in the late 80s or early 90s, a windstorm from the west blew
out nearly all of the front and back auto windshields in a parking
lot. IIRC it wasn't debris, but the wind itself. It gets to howling
there some times.

Probably nothing to do with the current situation, though. I'd have
to think that a wind that strong would also bend the airplanes up a
bit.

  #23  
Old February 19th 07, 04:57 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air
Mike Hunt
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Default Epidemic of cracked windshields in KDEN, explanation unknown

Jim Macklin wrote:

How cold did it get in Denver? Aluminum and plastic have
different contraction rates with cold. Plastic also gets
brittle with cold. Wind flexes wing, which also flexes
fuselages, erg---cracks.


Wow. Really? Isn't it cold at 40000 feet?

  #24  
Old February 19th 07, 04:59 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air
Noktomezo
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Default Epidemic of cracked windshields in KDEN, explanation unknown

On Feb 18, 10:57 pm, Mike Hunt [email protected] wrote:
Jim Macklin wrote:
How cold did it get in Denver? Aluminum and plastic have
different contraction rates with cold. Plastic also gets
brittle with cold. Wind flexes wing, which also flexes
fuselages, erg---cracks.


Wow. Really? Isn't it cold at 40000 feet?


Usually -50.

  #25  
Old February 19th 07, 01:19 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air
Blueskies
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Default Epidemic of cracked windshields in KDEN, explanation unknown


"Noktomezo" wrote in message oups.com...
: On Feb 18, 10:57 pm, Mike Hunt [email protected] wrote:
: Jim Macklin wrote:
: How cold did it get in Denver? Aluminum and plastic have
: different contraction rates with cold. Plastic also gets
: brittle with cold. Wind flexes wing, which also flexes
: fuselages, erg---cracks.
:
: Wow. Really? Isn't it cold at 40000 feet?
:
: Usually -50.
:

Does anyone know the type aircraft they are talking about here?


  #26  
Old February 19th 07, 10:04 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air
Mxsmanic
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Default Epidemic of cracked windshields in KDEN, explanation unknown

Blueskies writes:

Does anyone know the type aircraft they are talking about here?


Some Brazilian commuter aircraft were mentioned; possibly a few others.

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Transpose mxsmanic and gmail to reach me by e-mail.
  #27  
Old February 19th 07, 11:56 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air
Nobody
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Posts: 9
Default Epidemic of cracked windshields in KDEN, explanation unknown

Is it possible that in very cold weather, using some de-icing fluid that is
too hot would cause windshields to crack ?
  #28  
Old February 21st 07, 10:42 AM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air
Kenny McCormack
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Default Epidemic of cracked windshields in KDEN, explanation unknown

In article ,
Mxsmanic wrote:
Blanche writes:

High winds. Low temps (-15F and up) == very cold wind chill factor.


Wind chill applies only to people, not things.


Not just people. Any warm blooded animal.

For that matter, any heat-generating source (object).

  #29  
Old February 21st 07, 03:33 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air
Jose
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Default Epidemic of cracked windshields in KDEN, explanation unknown

For that matter, any heat-generating source (object).

Are you sure about that? I thought water evaporation had a lot to do
with it.

Jose
--
Humans are pack animals. Above all things, they have a deep need to
follow something, be it a leader, a creed, or a mob. Whosoever fully
understands this holds the world in his hands.
for Email, make the obvious change in the address.
  #30  
Old February 21st 07, 06:34 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting,rec.travel.air
Tony
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Posts: 312
Default Epidemic of cracked windshields in KDEN, explanation unknown

Wind chill has everything to do with how fast heat is lost from
someone at body temperature. It's widely held that the old data,
that's 'wind chill', is not a very accurate measure of the effect of
wind on flesh and there's some work going on for a better measure. The
statement the poster made about any heat-generating object is not
quite complete, I'm sure he meant to remind us that it's related to
the surface temperature of the object, or at least the surface
temperatture in no wind conditions.

Fans in your computer are there to move air mass against hot objects
to carry the heat away, they are trying to create 'wind chill' inside
the computer. You can google 'convective heat loss' or 'forced air
cooling' if you want to explore the subject in more depth.





s Itr has ewverything to do On Feb 21, 9:33 am, Jose
wrote:
For that matter, any heat-generating source (object).


Are you sure about that? I thought water evaporation had a lot to do
with it.

Jose
--
Humans are pack animals. Above all things, they have a deep need to
follow something, be it a leader, a creed, or a mob. Whosoever fully
understands this holds the world in his hands.
for Email, make the obvious change in the address.



 




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