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FAA Commercial Glider License Questions



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 29th 08, 05:00 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
borntoglide
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default FAA Commercial Glider License Questions

Does anyone know if an FAA Commercial Glider License is an ICAO
recognized license?
If so does anyone know where this is written down. I have searched the
ICAO website but cannot find a list of recognized licenses from each
country.

On another note if I wanted to do an FAA CPL Glider, coming from the
UK, would I need to get TSA approval (as for all other flight
training)?
What is invloved i.e what training/etc? I have around 180 hours and a
silver C.
Does anyone know any schools which they would recommend?
How long is it likely to take? would it be possible during a 2 week
holiday

Thanks

Ads
  #2  
Old July 29th 08, 05:43 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
sisu1a
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Posts: 544
Default FAA Commercial Glider License Questions

On Jul 29, 9:00 am, borntoglide wrote:
Does anyone know if an FAA Commercial Glider License is an ICAO
recognized license?


Not sure about the ICAO status of US licenses, but with an FAA glider
rating, a membership in the SSA makes that a valid an FAI sporting
license. I am interested on how that plays out on a commercial level
as well, but do not have the answer to that either. Post finding here.

On another note if I wanted to do an FAA CPL Glider, coming from the
UK, would I need to get TSA approval (as for all other flight
training)?


Not entirely sure about the TSA thing, but I don't think you need
their approval since gliders were exempted from the threat list early
on (thank you SSA!).

What is invloved i.e what training/etc? I have around 180 hours and a
silver C.


Since you are already licensed in the UK (I assume with 180 hrs and a
Silver C...) you will most likely be made to learn the bookwork part
to get you up to legal speed (assuming your instructor is happy with
your logs and evaluation flights) for the private rating, along with
teaching you the finer points on differences between UK ans US flying.
Once ready for your PRIVATE rating (a necessary first step) you need
to pass a written test and a practical test (an oral exam based on the
weak points of your written and a minimum of 3 flights with an FAA
examiner). Once you have a private rating in your hands, you will
pretty much repeat the process over again for your commercial but to
higher standards/tighter tolerances and another round of written/
practical tests.

Does anyone know any schools which they would recommend?
How long is it likely to take? would it be possible during a 2 week
holiday


Not knowing what part of the country you will be visiting makes
suggestions a little broad. We don't have many large "schools" here in
USA. Turf Soaring in AZ http://www.turfsoaring.com/ , Great Western in
Ca http://www.greatwesternsoaring.com/ , Bermuda High in SC http://www.glider.org/
, Elmira Soaring School http://www.wingsofeagles.com/soaringschool.cfm
(formerly Schweizer Soaring School) are a few that come to mind.

On the whole, glider ops in USA don't usually use the word "school" in
their titles, as any club/commercial operation already serves this
purpose. If you post your US destination, a detailed list of glider
training options in your area can be compiled. In the meantime, your
specific questions regarding training can be answered over the phone
by operators at the sites already linked (and I'm sure you will get
many more answers here-both right and wrong...)

Is 2 weeks enough to knock this out? Hmmmm, very subjective since it
will be based on your skill/motivation coupled with availability of
equipment/instructors/examiners, however it sounds pretty marginal
even under the best of circumstances. Hoe this helps!

-Paul

  #3  
Old July 30th 08, 12:18 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 351
Default FAA Commercial Glider License Questions

Thankfully TSA had the sense to exempt glider and balloon training
from its ridiculous Alien Flight Training rule, so fear not and take
advantage of the weak dollar to get that glider rating.
  #4  
Old July 30th 08, 12:26 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Burt Compton - Marfa
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Posts: 221
Default FAA Commercial Glider License Questions

Hello from Texas.

I can tell you from my recent experience as a CFI and FAA Designated
Pilot Examiner that Germany recognizes the FAA pilot certificate under
ICAO, but I do not know where this is written, so you should inquire
with your country's aviation authorities as to how they interpret the
ICAO agreements.

In the US, the FAA does require a US FAA pilot certificate to fly as
PIC a US registered aircraft (N numbered) in the US (see FAR 61.3)
Get a copy of the current regs -- I use the ASA brand publication
called "FAR/AIM 2008". (You can fly a German "D" registered glider
with a FAA pilot certificate under the German interpretation of the
ICAO agreements, but that's off-topic.)

The TSA exemption for glider pilots / instructors (glider only CFI;s)
is he http://dmses.dot.gov/docimages/pdf90/302470_web.pdf

There is also a wealth of good info on the TSA requirements and this
exemption at www.aopa.org

As an FAA Designated Pilot Examiner I have given 38 Practical Tests
("checkrides") to foreign glider pilots in the last 14 months. Paul
is correct, the flying part is fun but learning the US regulations,
procedures is the book work you will need to accomplish on your own.
There are many good texts to acquire the information.

If you do not hold an "unrestricted" FAA pilot certificate (such as
airplane) or are not adding the rating to a "Restricted" FAA
certificate then you WILL need to take the appropriate glider pilot /
Airman Knowledge Test (formerly called "the written") even though you
hold a foreign license.

Those foreign pilots with "Restricted" FAA certificates wanting to add
glider to that certificate will need to go through the FAA (not TSA)
process called "Verification of Foreign License". After a couple of
rejected applications FAA clarified this in their recent Notice N
8000.364.
This is found at http://www.faa.gov/library/manuals/e...spectors/8000/

Before 9/11, it was very easy for a foreign licensed pilot to quickly
obtain the FAA "Restricted" Certificate at a FAA FSDO just by filling
out a FAA Form 8710-1 Application, but now you must go through the FAA
(not TSA) License verification process first, which takes several
weeks as they contact your country's aviation authorities, to verify
that your foreign license AND MEDICAL (if required in your country) is
valid.

That's how I've worked it out with the FAA, at least with my FSDO
Inspectors, who are very cooperative.

I am located near the Davis Mountains in far west Texas, between
Carlsbad Caverns and Big Bend National Parks and I fly year-round.
Nearest airline service is to El Paso (ELP) and Midland (MAF) if you
wish to train with me at Marfa. If you are looking for the "piece of
cake / crash course", I'm not the guy you want to fly with. I am
friendly, fun and very thorough. Just ask the Germans!

Send inquries for glider training, texts to study and more to:
[email protected],com

Best regards,

Burt Compton, Master CFIG / FAA Designated Pilot Examiner
Marfa Gliders, west Texas
www.flygliders.com
  #5  
Old July 30th 08, 12:39 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Burt Compton - Marfa
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 221
Default FAA Commercial Glider License Questions

What training/etc?

All FAA Pilot Training MINIMUM requirements are listed in CFR (FAR)
Part 61.
Commercial Pilots -- read FAR 61.121 through 61.133.

The FAA website www.faa.gov is a starting point to see the actual
regulations.

Boring, but essential to know.

The FAR's in Part 61 list how you obtain your FAA pilot
certificates.
The FAR's in Part 91 list how they might take it away from you!

Burt
Marfa, Texas
USA
  #6  
Old July 30th 08, 01:10 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Neil MacLean[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default FAA Commercial Glider License Questions

I think there are two answers to this question, depending on what you want
to do.
I lived in the US and flew at several operations for a few years and
unless things have changed, my experience is that with your UK gliding
qualifications it is not necessary to go through any of the steps listed
to get an FAA gliding licence, even a commercial one. I visited the local
FAA FSDO and showed them my (BGA) log books and FAI certificate, and
walked out with an FAA Commercial Pilot's Licence (gliders). They wanted
to see in my log books that I had completed appropriate training (so take
all your log book since ab initio) and had completed the necessary number
of hours. And my FAI certificate (I had gold but silver is fine) was
accepted as evidence of qualification. I don't remember how many hours
are necessary for a Commercial licence but it's a lot less than 180.

So getting the licence is simple. However before you can fly you will have
to complete a biennial flight review and get that signed off in your log.
This doesn't need an FAA examiner but can be with any certified
instructor at any club or commercial operation. Conduct of the BFR is up
to the instructor but this is the time when the instructor may check that
you are familiar with US regulations, and will need to do at least three
short flights or fewer longer soaring flights to satisfy him or herself
that your skills are up to standard. But very little teaching is involved
- my first three flights in the US completed my BFR on my first day at a
gliding site. If you are only there for a limited period a commercial
operation would suit you better than a club as you can book a session with
an instructor and 'pay as you go' rather than joining a club and taking
your turn.

And finally (a sting in the tail) my commercial licence gained on the
basis of foreign qualifications was marked 'RESTRICTED' and the
restriction is that the holder is not allowed to fly for hire or reward.
I'm not sure what is the purpose of such a licence is but I found it
useful when visiting new gliding sites as it shows that you have a much
greater level of experience than a 'PRIVATE' licence which only requires
about 7 hours (or something pretty low). And at the sites I flew at I was
often asked to do flights with passengers (without payment) since people
like to know that the pilot has a commercial rating. But if you want to
fly professionally or for any payment you will need to get this
restriction lifted, for which you need to go through the US system, and
complete written and flight exams as described.

I understand that an FAA pilot's licence is a valid ICAO licence,
provided it it is kept valid with a biennial flight review, which is
necessary for any US pilot. (SSA membership is not relevant.) But I can't
comment on the TSA matter as that was introduced after I got my licence.

Neil

At 16:43 29 July 2008, sisu1a wrote:
On Jul 29, 9:00 am, borntoglide wrote:
Does anyone know if an FAA Commercial Glider License is an ICAO
recognized license?


Not sure about the ICAO status of US licenses, but with an FAA glider
rating, a membership in the SSA makes that a valid an FAI sporting
license. I am interested on how that plays out on a commercial level
as well, but do not have the answer to that either. Post finding here.

On another note if I wanted to do an FAA CPL Glider, coming from the
UK, would I need to get TSA approval (as for all other flight
training)?


Not entirely sure about the TSA thing, but I don't think you need
their approval since gliders were exempted from the threat list early
on (thank you SSA!).

What is invloved i.e what training/etc? I have around 180 hours and a
silver C.


Since you are already licensed in the UK (I assume with 180 hrs and a
Silver C...) you will most likely be made to learn the bookwork part
to get you up to legal speed (assuming your instructor is happy with
your logs and evaluation flights) for the private rating, along with
teaching you the finer points on differences between UK ans US flying.
Once ready for your PRIVATE rating (a necessary first step) you need
to pass a written test and a practical test (an oral exam based on the
weak points of your written and a minimum of 3 flights with an FAA
examiner). Once you have a private rating in your hands, you will
pretty much repeat the process over again for your commercial but to
higher standards/tighter tolerances and another round of written/
practical tests.

Does anyone know any schools which they would recommend?
How long is it likely to take? would it be possible during a 2 week
holiday


Not knowing what part of the country you will be visiting makes
suggestions a little broad. We don't have many large "schools" here

in
USA. Turf Soaring in AZ http://www.turfsoaring.com/ , Great Western in
Ca http://www.greatwesternsoaring.com/ , Bermuda High in SC
http://www.glider.org/
, Elmira Soaring School http://www.wingsofeagles.com/soaringschool.cfm
(formerly Schweizer Soaring School) are a few that come to mind.

On the whole, glider ops in USA don't usually use the word "school"

in
their titles, as any club/commercial operation already serves this
purpose. If you post your US destination, a detailed list of glider
training options in your area can be compiled. In the meantime, your
specific questions regarding training can be answered over the phone
by operators at the sites already linked (and I'm sure you will get
many more answers here-both right and wrong...)

Is 2 weeks enough to knock this out? Hmmmm, very subjective since it
will be based on your skill/motivation coupled with availability of
equipment/instructors/examiners, however it sounds pretty marginal
even under the best of circumstances. Hoe this helps!

-Paul


  #7  
Old July 30th 08, 02:31 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 141
Default FAA Commercial Glider License Questions

Borntoglide:

You have pretty good answers already, so all I'll add is that you can
get a commercial rating in the world's best soaring site, AND get in
some fantastic soaring, at SoaringNV -- a new soaring operation in
Minden, Nevada. We're in a very scenic location and you can fly to
Reno (40 miles north of us) from just about anywhere in the world.

See our website at www.soaringnv.com We are competitively priced
for a commercial operation. Two weeks should do it,

Fred LaSor
775 790-4314
Minden, NV
  #8  
Old July 30th 08, 11:35 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
borntoglide
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default FAA Commercial Glider License Questions

All,
Thanks for all the useful information. I atually already have a
"restricted " FAA Private Power (SEP) and Glider license on the basis
of my UK gliding experience and my JAA PPL. I had never considered
that you might be able to upgrade to a commercial this way based just
on previous experience. I wonder if its possible to "upgrade" from
Private to commercial based on experience even though I already have
Private on my license?
As for training - thanks for all the suggestions. I will check the
websites and post back when I decide which part of the US to go.
Thanks again for all the info

  #9  
Old July 30th 08, 03:48 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Burt Compton - Marfa
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 221
Default FAA Commercial Glider License Questions

Regarding poster Neil's interesting account but now out-of-date
information of how he obtained a "Restricted" FAA Pilot Certificate
based upon his foreign pilot license / experience, here is the latest
from the FAA website at www.faa.gov

Note: Verification of your Foreign License should be accomplished at
least 90 days before visiting your FAA FSDO. Since 9/11/2001, you
willl need to call the FSDO to make an appointment with the FAA
Inspector who manages pilot certification.


From the FAA Website: Airmen Certification: Verify the Authenticity
of a Foreign License, Rating, or Medical Certification

Foreign License
If you are applying for a certificate issued on the basis of a foreign
license under the provisions of:

14 CFR Part 61, Section 61.75
special purpose pilot authorizations under Section 61.77
using a pilot certificate issued under Section 61.75 to apply for a
commercial pilot certificate under Section 61.123 (h)
applying for an airline transport pilot certificate issued under
Section 61.153 (d) (3)
applying for a certificate issued on the basis of a foreign license
under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 63, Sections 63.23 and 63.42
Then you must have the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) that issued
those certificates verify the validity and currency of the foreign
license and medical certificate or endorsement before you apply for an
FAA certificate or authorization.

Send Us Your Information
You can provide the required information using the optional
Verification of Authenticity of Foreign License, Rating, and Medical
Certification (PDF) form.

You can send us the form and the preferred documents two ways:

By Mail
Federal Aviation Administration
Airmen Certification Branch, AFS-760
P.O. Box 25082
Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0082
By Fax
(405) 954-9922

NOTE: If your application and documentation for foreign verification
is received with missing and/or illegible information, you will be
notified and required to resend your application and all required
documentation by mail.

You can't send the pre-application documents electronically.

Rating or Medical Certificate
A person who is applying for a U.S. rating or medical certificate on
the basis of a foreign license must apply for that certificate at
least 90 days before arriving at the designated FAA FSDO where the
applicant intends to receive the U.S. certificate. This initial
application step is the responsibility of the applicant.

The information you submit to the Airmen Certification Branch must
include your:

name and date of birth

address where you wish to have the verification of the authenticity
letter mailed

certificate number and ratings on the foreign license

country of issuance of your foreign license

location of the FAA Flight Standards District Office where you intend
to apply for your U.S. certificate

statement that your foreign license is not under an order of
suspension or revocation

Note: The Airmen Certification Branch would prefer to have a copy of
the foreign license and medical certificate or endorsement included
with all requests for verification of authenticity of the foreign
license.

When we receive verification from the CAA, you will receive written
notification that we forwarded a copy to the Flight Standards District
Office (FSDO) you designated in your request. The verification is
valid for 6 calendar months. You may apply for a U.S. certificate at
the designated FSDO during that period.

You can mail the information to:

Federal Aviation Administration
Airmen Certification Branch, AFS-760
P.O. Box 25082
Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0082


Additional Requirements for United Kingdom and Australia Applicants:

In addition to the procedures stated under Verification of
Authenticity of Foreign license, Rating and Medical Certification
above, airmen from the United Kingdom or Australia must contact their
respective CAA to complete additional forms that are required PRIOR to
providing the requested information to the Airmen Certification
Branch. We have provided a link to each CAA for your convenience: UK
CAA website, Australia CAA website.

Note
You must send the Verification of Authenticity of Foreign license,
Rating and Medical Certification form directly to FAA's Airmen
Certification Branch, not to the UK or Australia CAA.
You must send the information required by the UK or Australia CAA
directly to the UK or Australia CAA and not to FAA's Airmen
Certification Branch.




 




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