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A GA pilot in the White House



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 28th 04, 01:36 PM
Roger Long
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Default A GA pilot in the White House

Would they let him fly or would the TFR's keep him grounded?

--
Roger Long


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  #2  
Old January 28th 04, 01:59 PM
Roger Tracy
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Well .. since the Presidential TFR follows him .. he'd always be right in
the center of it and unable to fly.


"Roger Long" om wrote in
message ...
Would they let him fly or would the TFR's keep him grounded?

--
Roger Long




  #3  
Old January 28th 04, 04:32 PM
H. Adam Stevens
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I percieve a new Zen koan here.

"Roger Tracy" wrote in message
...
Well .. since the Presidential TFR follows him .. he'd always be right in
the center of it and unable to fly.


"Roger Long" om wrote

in
message ...
Would they let him fly or would the TFR's keep him grounded?

--
Roger Long






  #4  
Old January 28th 04, 05:04 PM
C J Campbell
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"Roger Long" om wrote in
message ...
| Would they let him fly or would the TFR's keep him grounded?
|

I doubt very much the Secret Service would allow him to fly himself.


  #5  
Old January 28th 04, 05:10 PM
Neil Gould
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Recently, C J Campbell posted:

"Roger Long" om
wrote in message ...
Would they let him fly or would the TFR's keep him grounded?


I doubt very much the Secret Service would allow him to fly himself.

That would wreak havoc on his currency. Perhaps that will give him cause
for pause? 8-)

Who here would give up flying for 4 years to be president?

Neil (putting hand down sharply)


  #6  
Old January 28th 04, 06:01 PM
Peter Duniho
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"Neil Gould" wrote in message
.net...
That would wreak havoc on his currency. Perhaps that will give him cause
for pause? 8-)

Who here would give up flying for 4 years to be president?


Who here would put up with any of the crap required in order to get into the
White House just to be President?

One problem (among many) in politics is that the most qualified people for
the job are usually the least interested in it. The people who succeed do
so for all the wrong reasons, in all the wrong ways, regardless of political
party.

I doubt anyone who's gotten as far in the Presidential race as Kerry has
would think twice about giving up flying for a term (or two) in the White
House. It's a no-brainer for someone like that, just as it's a no-brainer
for most of us to stick to flying.

Pete


  #7  
Old January 28th 04, 07:23 PM
C J Campbell
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"Roger Long" om wrote in
message ...
| Would they let him fly or would the TFR's keep him grounded?

Aside from whether the Secret Service would let him fly, the TFRs are
usually worded in such a way as to allow the President and various other
individuals to fly. The President frequently takes off from the White House
lawn, which is prohibited airspace, even more restrictive than a TFR.

The TFRs allow movement by law enforcement and military aircraft. Arguably
the Commander in Chief and head law enforcement official of the United
States has permission to fly through any TFR.


  #8  
Old January 28th 04, 07:27 PM
Paul Tomblin
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In a previous article, "Roger Long" om said:
Would they let him fly or would the TFR's keep him grounded?


Who would bust him if he violated his own TFR?

More importantly, what would they call the flight? "Civil One"?


--
Paul Tomblin http://xcski.com/blogs/pt/
"Towards thee I roll, thou all-destroying but unconquering ******; to the
last I grapple with thee; from hell's heart I killfile thee; for hate's
sake I spit my last post at thee! All your base are belong to us!"
  #9  
Old January 28th 04, 07:49 PM
C J Campbell
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"Paul Tomblin" wrote in message
...
| In a previous article, "Roger Long"
om said:
| Would they let him fly or would the TFR's keep him grounded?
|
| Who would bust him if he violated his own TFR?
|
| More importantly, what would they call the flight? "Civil One"?

It might not be technically proper, but they probably would call it "Air
Force One" out of habit.

That points up the reason the Secret Service would not let him fly. Besides
being an unnecessary risk, the call sign "Air Force One" was adopted after a
near miss involving the Presidential airplane. Before that they used
ordinary call signs. The idea behind "Air Force One" was to encourage
controllers to be more careful. Putting a President up in an civil general
aviation aircraft would expose him to all kinds of dangers the Secret
Service would find unacceptable. The airplane would be more vulnerable to
ground fire, it is more susceptible to mid-air collisions, low level
maneuvering would be regarded as dangerous, etc. Imagine trying to cram the
Secret Service detail, "the football," and everything else that goes with
President aboard a typical GA plane. It is tough enough if the President
just wants to go fishing for an afternoon.

The President's political opponents would "Tilt," too. "How can he risk the
fate of the free world so irresponsibly?"

No, once you become President, you can forget about doing a lot of things
that most people take for granted. You are almost as much a prisoner as the
Emperor of China was in the Forbidden City.


  #10  
Old January 28th 04, 08:06 PM
Orval Fairbairn
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In article ,
(Paul Tomblin) wrote:

In a previous article, "Roger Long"
om said:
Would they let him fly or would the TFR's keep him grounded?


Who would bust him if he violated his own TFR?

More importantly, what would they call the flight? "Civil One"?



"Executive One."
 




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