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The end of the manned fighter?



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 17th 04, 06:58 PM
Cub Driver
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default The end of the manned fighter?


From today's Aero-News email newsletter:

The End Of Manned Fighters?
F-35 Will Be Last Of Traditional Aircraft

The top gun of the
future will be a robot - not your hormone-pumping human aviator.
Unmanned aircraft will be the key to the modern battlefield as the
traditional fighter aircraft is phased out, say industry analysts.
In fact, some believe the F-35 may well be the end of the line for
American fighters. This was the most obvious change at last month's
Asian Aerospace 2004 fair in Singapore. By presenting analyses and
demonstration charts, industry analysts described the decline of
the traditional fighter jet. All agreed this would mark the end of
one era and the beginning of a new one -- when the unmanned
aircraft will lead the way into the modern battlefield.

This prediction is undoubtedly sending anxiety chills down the
spines of air industry executives who fear they are behind time in
entering the new emerging market. They realize existing
21st-century fighter jets and bombers will remain in service,
though more on the basis of continuous upgrading, especially in the
area of avionics and electronic devices. Their rationale supporting
the determination unmanned aircraft, will in the very near future,
take a leading role, is connected to rapid developments of
sophisticated warfare techniques. Accelerated technological
advancements are expected to prevent the growing danger to pilots
and crews in traditionally manned planes. Many of them are already
overwhelmed with high-tech tasks or with learning and coping with
new, almost sci-fi equipment being installed in their cockpits.

The most celebrated exhibit was the one representing Israel's
aircraft industry. The success story around Israeli electronic
developments and other technological advances goes back to times
when other, much stronger nations, refused to recognize the value
of unmanned aircraft. Israel demonstrated and proved the
battlefield value of medium or even small-unmanned aircraft already
in the early '70s.

Shlomo Tzakh, leading
project planner in the engineering division at the Israel aircraft
industry company, who also directs and oversees the development of
unmanned aircraft, told journalists, "The area of unmanned vehicles
leads today in the development of aircraft for military purposes.
The assumption among members of military aeronautics is indeed that
the U.S. F-35 is going to be the last manned aircraft to be
developed."

Tzakh and other experts who met at the Singapore event, say this
is the primary reason for the rapid growth in the development and
manufacturing of unmanned aircraft. According to Tzakh and Israeli
aircraft industry calculations, investments in these and in similar
products, is going to grow seven times within one decade. Tzakh is
famous for being cautious, always holding on to prudence rather
than being hasty. It is, therefore, quite safe to expect these
changes at a significantly faster rate.

While most developers wrestle with problems already solved by
the Israeli aircraft industry in the last few years, the planning
division, as well as planners in Rafael, Israel's Research and
Development Defense Institute, and some companies operating in the
free market and teaming with the U.S. aeronautic industry, are now
moving toward the development of unmanned cargo planes, capable
also of being used as a platform for a variety of intelligence and
weapon systems.

One of the participants
in the Singapore exhibition said the U.S. industry is examining
ways to turn regular military transporters into unmanned vehicles,
while the Israeli preferred method is to plan an unmanned plane
right from the beginning. A cargo aircraft capable of carrying 10
tons of goods, or equipment, stored in containers hooked to its
belly, is now in the early drafting stages. This Israeli model will
have a wing span of 25 meters, it will be driven by two engines and
weigh 30 tons on take off. Some analysts have speculated the model,
although dubbed "cargo plane," will have almost infinite military
uses, including becoming another link in a missile defense
project.

A Chinese observer who was familiar with the project said it
would definitely be capable of carrying into a hostile environment
a large amount of missiles aimed at intercepting enemy missiles. He
also added it could be used as an anti-submarine patrol aircraft,
capable of detecting and destroying under water targets. The
Israeli concept states that developing an unmanned aircraft robot,
acting in an automatic way, is much more feasible than spending
time and efforts on re-configuring existing transporters. Tzakh
refused to reveal any information about the production date of the
Israeli system but said that in the U.S. and Europe many believe
such a platform will be a reality in the 2020s.

An Israeli Internet newspaper quoted Tzakh saying the Israeli
aircraft industry is regarded as a world leader in the development
of unmanned aircraft. Two Israeli models are in active service with
the U.S. Army and Navy, while in Europe the Israeli aircraft
industry is leading a classified research with 40 different
organizations from all corners of the European Union.

The Israeli air force is proud to note that historically it was
the first to use unmanned aircraft in its tactical and strategic
operations. Unmanned aircraft of the Searcher family, used during
the 1982 Lebanon war, was instrumental in discovering and
pinpointing Syrian anti-aircraft batteries, which were then
destroyed. Based on the Searcher's achievements, the U.S. Navy
cooperated with the Israeli aircraft industry in the development of
the Pioneer, which proved a success in the first Gulf War of 1991.
The magazine article also revealed that during the '90s the U.S.
Army commissioned a much more sophisticated unmanned aircraft, the
Hunter, which was built by Israel and the American TRW Company.
Military analysts agree the Hunter was a complete success during
the operations in Kosovo and last year's war in Iraq. TRW was
purchased by Northrop-Grumman who is now trying to provide the
Hunter with attack capabilities by carrying an array of
missiles.

Among others it was
also learned the Israeli aircraft industry is operating a
futuristic unit now focusing on two separate, yet parallel efforts:
the design of heavy unmanned aircraft and that of light naval
platforms. Launching tests of a 300-gram drone designed for
battlefield control by small units were successfully conducted in
Israel and proven as an intelligence asset during operations in the
West Bank and Gaza. This specific model, now being manufactured for
unspecified clients, is called Micro. It weighs 300 grams, carries
a 20-gram camera with a 35-minute durability, and has a flight
ceiling of 300 meters. The latest development of the Micro is
specifically to be used by ground forces involved in urban counter
insurgency activity.

Some of the conclusions to be drawn from the Singapore
exhibition point to the fact the military should shift a lot more
attention to the endless possibilities of unmanned aircraft and
submarines, as well as to other robotic military vehicles and
equipment. These new inventions will undoubtedly change the face of
the modern battlefield in a dramatic way that on the long run will
prove as decisive as the arrival of the first flying machines over
the battlefields of the First World War.
FMI:
http://www.iaf.org.il/iaf/doa_iis.dl...glish/1.3.html

For the WHOLE story, go to
http://www.aero-news.net/news/milita...c-6e7b909c58cd
all the best -- Dan Ford
email: (requires authentication)

see the Warbird's Forum at
www.warbirdforum.com
and the Piper Cub Forum at www.pipercubforum.com
Ads
  #2  
Old March 17th 04, 07:07 PM
Tarver Engineering
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Cub Driver" wrote in message
...

From today's Aero-News email newsletter:

The End Of Manned Fighters?
F-35 Will Be Last Of Traditional Aircraft


Some of the conclusions to be drawn from the Singapore
exhibition point to the fact the military should shift a lot more
attention to the endless possibilities of unmanned aircraft and
submarines, as well as to other robotic military vehicles and
equipment. These new inventions will undoubtedly change the face of
the modern battlefield in a dramatic way that on the long run will
prove as decisive as the arrival of the first flying machines over
the battlefields of the First World War.


Imagine that.

FMI:
http://www.iaf.org.il/iaf/doa_iis.dl...glish/1.3.html

For the WHOLE story, go to

http://www.aero-news.net/news/milita...c-6e7b909c58cd


  #3  
Old March 17th 04, 07:42 PM
W. D. Allen Sr.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Just like the 1960s when the air-to-air missile was to make made machine
guns unnecessary. That lasted only until the fur balls started over North
Vietnam!

DUUUUH!!!

From an old missile engineer.

WDA

end

"Cub Driver" wrote in message
...

From today's Aero-News email newsletter:

The End Of Manned Fighters?
F-35 Will Be Last Of Traditional Aircraft

The top gun of the
future will be a robot - not your hormone-pumping human aviator.
Unmanned aircraft will be the key to the modern battlefield as the
traditional fighter aircraft is phased out, say industry analysts.
In fact, some believe the F-35 may well be the end of the line for
American fighters. This was the most obvious change at last month's
Asian Aerospace 2004 fair in Singapore. By presenting analyses and
demonstration charts, industry analysts described the decline of
the traditional fighter jet. All agreed this would mark the end of
one era and the beginning of a new one -- when the unmanned
aircraft will lead the way into the modern battlefield.

This prediction is undoubtedly sending anxiety chills down the
spines of air industry executives who fear they are behind time in
entering the new emerging market. They realize existing
21st-century fighter jets and bombers will remain in service,
though more on the basis of continuous upgrading, especially in the
area of avionics and electronic devices. Their rationale supporting
the determination unmanned aircraft, will in the very near future,
take a leading role, is connected to rapid developments of
sophisticated warfare techniques. Accelerated technological
advancements are expected to prevent the growing danger to pilots
and crews in traditionally manned planes. Many of them are already
overwhelmed with high-tech tasks or with learning and coping with
new, almost sci-fi equipment being installed in their cockpits.

The most celebrated exhibit was the one representing Israel's
aircraft industry. The success story around Israeli electronic
developments and other technological advances goes back to times
when other, much stronger nations, refused to recognize the value
of unmanned aircraft. Israel demonstrated and proved the
battlefield value of medium or even small-unmanned aircraft already
in the early '70s.

Shlomo Tzakh, leading
project planner in the engineering division at the Israel aircraft
industry company, who also directs and oversees the development of
unmanned aircraft, told journalists, "The area of unmanned vehicles
leads today in the development of aircraft for military purposes.
The assumption among members of military aeronautics is indeed that
the U.S. F-35 is going to be the last manned aircraft to be
developed."

Tzakh and other experts who met at the Singapore event, say this
is the primary reason for the rapid growth in the development and
manufacturing of unmanned aircraft. According to Tzakh and Israeli
aircraft industry calculations, investments in these and in similar
products, is going to grow seven times within one decade. Tzakh is
famous for being cautious, always holding on to prudence rather
than being hasty. It is, therefore, quite safe to expect these
changes at a significantly faster rate.

While most developers wrestle with problems already solved by
the Israeli aircraft industry in the last few years, the planning
division, as well as planners in Rafael, Israel's Research and
Development Defense Institute, and some companies operating in the
free market and teaming with the U.S. aeronautic industry, are now
moving toward the development of unmanned cargo planes, capable
also of being used as a platform for a variety of intelligence and
weapon systems.

One of the participants
in the Singapore exhibition said the U.S. industry is examining
ways to turn regular military transporters into unmanned vehicles,
while the Israeli preferred method is to plan an unmanned plane
right from the beginning. A cargo aircraft capable of carrying 10
tons of goods, or equipment, stored in containers hooked to its
belly, is now in the early drafting stages. This Israeli model will
have a wing span of 25 meters, it will be driven by two engines and
weigh 30 tons on take off. Some analysts have speculated the model,
although dubbed "cargo plane," will have almost infinite military
uses, including becoming another link in a missile defense
project.

A Chinese observer who was familiar with the project said it
would definitely be capable of carrying into a hostile environment
a large amount of missiles aimed at intercepting enemy missiles. He
also added it could be used as an anti-submarine patrol aircraft,
capable of detecting and destroying under water targets. The
Israeli concept states that developing an unmanned aircraft robot,
acting in an automatic way, is much more feasible than spending
time and efforts on re-configuring existing transporters. Tzakh
refused to reveal any information about the production date of the
Israeli system but said that in the U.S. and Europe many believe
such a platform will be a reality in the 2020s.

An Israeli Internet newspaper quoted Tzakh saying the Israeli
aircraft industry is regarded as a world leader in the development
of unmanned aircraft. Two Israeli models are in active service with
the U.S. Army and Navy, while in Europe the Israeli aircraft
industry is leading a classified research with 40 different
organizations from all corners of the European Union.

The Israeli air force is proud to note that historically it was
the first to use unmanned aircraft in its tactical and strategic
operations. Unmanned aircraft of the Searcher family, used during
the 1982 Lebanon war, was instrumental in discovering and
pinpointing Syrian anti-aircraft batteries, which were then
destroyed. Based on the Searcher's achievements, the U.S. Navy
cooperated with the Israeli aircraft industry in the development of
the Pioneer, which proved a success in the first Gulf War of 1991.
The magazine article also revealed that during the '90s the U.S.
Army commissioned a much more sophisticated unmanned aircraft, the
Hunter, which was built by Israel and the American TRW Company.
Military analysts agree the Hunter was a complete success during
the operations in Kosovo and last year's war in Iraq. TRW was
purchased by Northrop-Grumman who is now trying to provide the
Hunter with attack capabilities by carrying an array of
missiles.

Among others it was
also learned the Israeli aircraft industry is operating a
futuristic unit now focusing on two separate, yet parallel efforts:
the design of heavy unmanned aircraft and that of light naval
platforms. Launching tests of a 300-gram drone designed for
battlefield control by small units were successfully conducted in
Israel and proven as an intelligence asset during operations in the
West Bank and Gaza. This specific model, now being manufactured for
unspecified clients, is called Micro. It weighs 300 grams, carries
a 20-gram camera with a 35-minute durability, and has a flight
ceiling of 300 meters. The latest development of the Micro is
specifically to be used by ground forces involved in urban counter
insurgency activity.

Some of the conclusions to be drawn from the Singapore
exhibition point to the fact the military should shift a lot more
attention to the endless possibilities of unmanned aircraft and
submarines, as well as to other robotic military vehicles and
equipment. These new inventions will undoubtedly change the face of
the modern battlefield in a dramatic way that on the long run will
prove as decisive as the arrival of the first flying machines over
the battlefields of the First World War.
FMI:
http://www.iaf.org.il/iaf/doa_iis.dl...glish/1.3.html

For the WHOLE story, go to

http://www.aero-news.net/news/milita...c-6e7b909c58cd
all the best -- Dan Ford
email: (requires authentication)

see the Warbird's Forum at
www.warbirdforum.com
and the Piper Cub Forum at www.pipercubforum.com



  #4  
Old March 18th 04, 12:34 AM
Vaughn
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Cub Driver" wrote in message
...

From today's Aero-News email newsletter:

The End Of Manned Fighters?
F-35 Will Be Last Of Traditional Aircraft

I believe unmanned fighters are here to stay and there will be an
increasing role for them, but that does not mean that the manned variety are
in any danger of extinction. Actually, we have had unmanned fighters for
decades, we just used to call them missiles.

Remember a few decades ago when they said that guns were obsolete on
fighters?

Vaughn


  #5  
Old March 18th 04, 01:20 AM
Ed Majden
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Cub Driver"
The End Of Manned Fighters?
F-35 Will Be Last Of Traditional Aircraft

You mean to tell me that they are bringing back the Bomarc? No arrogant
pilot trying to tell you that he wasn't up-side-down when he fired his
missile and no pesky radar operator telling you his radar was broken just
because he screwed up and couldn't achieve a lock-on!

A ground crew debriefers heaven! ;-)

Ed

Retired AST (Radar Systems Tech) RCAF/CAF



  #6  
Old March 18th 04, 01:25 AM
John Carrier
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The End Of Manned Fighters?

No doubt the UCAV will compliment the manned aircraft. Whether as the
majority of the force, or merely a significant supplemental to the manned
jets, remains to be seen. I think they'll arrive in number later rather
than sooner.

R / John


  #7  
Old March 18th 04, 04:01 AM
monkey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Tarver Engineering" wrote in message
...
"Cub Driver" wrote in message
...

From today's Aero-News email newsletter:

The End Of Manned Fighters?
F-35 Will Be Last Of Traditional Aircraft


Some of the conclusions to be drawn from the Singapore
exhibition point to the fact the military should shift a lot more
attention to the endless possibilities of unmanned aircraft and
submarines, as well as to other robotic military vehicles and
equipment. These new inventions will undoubtedly change the face of
the modern battlefield in a dramatic way that on the long run will
prove as decisive as the arrival of the first flying machines over
the battlefields of the First World War.


Imagine that.

FMI:
http://www.iaf.org.il/iaf/doa_iis.dl...glish/1.3.html

For the WHOLE story, go to

http://www.aero-news.net/news/milita...c-6e7b909c58cd


UAVs are not a panacea - they can't do anything. Besides, pilots run
the world's air forces anyhow- we won't give up our cockpits that
easily
  #8  
Old March 18th 04, 04:02 AM
monkey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Tarver Engineering" wrote in message ...
"Cub Driver" wrote in message
...

From today's Aero-News email newsletter:

The End Of Manned Fighters?
F-35 Will Be Last Of Traditional Aircraft


Some of the conclusions to be drawn from the Singapore
exhibition point to the fact the military should shift a lot more
attention to the endless possibilities of unmanned aircraft and
submarines, as well as to other robotic military vehicles and
equipment. These new inventions will undoubtedly change the face of
the modern battlefield in a dramatic way that on the long run will
prove as decisive as the arrival of the first flying machines over
the battlefields of the First World War.


Imagine that.

FMI:
http://www.iaf.org.il/iaf/doa_iis.dl...glish/1.3.html

For the WHOLE story, go to

http://www.aero-news.net/news/milita...c-6e7b909c58cd



Oops I did't mean to type "they can't do anything", I meant
"everything." Maybe they should replace us pilots. Sheeit.
  #9  
Old March 18th 04, 04:56 AM
Tarver Engineering
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"monkey" wrote in message
om...
"Tarver Engineering" wrote in message
...
"Cub Driver" wrote in message
...

From today's Aero-News email newsletter:

The End Of Manned Fighters?
F-35 Will Be Last Of Traditional Aircraft


Some of the conclusions to be drawn from the Singapore
exhibition point to the fact the military should shift a lot more
attention to the endless possibilities of unmanned aircraft and
submarines, as well as to other robotic military vehicles and
equipment. These new inventions will undoubtedly change the face of
the modern battlefield in a dramatic way that on the long run will
prove as decisive as the arrival of the first flying machines over
the battlefields of the First World War.


Imagine that.

FMI:
http://www.iaf.org.il/iaf/doa_iis.dl...glish/1.3.html

For the WHOLE story, go to


http://www.aero-news.net/news/milita...c-6e7b909c58cd

UAVs are not a panacea - they can't do anything. Besides, pilots run
the world's air forces anyhow- we won't give up our cockpits that
easily


I fifty years perhaps.


  #10  
Old March 18th 04, 11:51 AM
Cub Driver
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 17 Mar 2004 23:34:19 GMT, "Vaughn"
wrote:

I believe unmanned fighters are here to stay


Well, sure, but in the way that intercontinental bombers are here to
stay. It's just that we aren't building them any longer.

all the best -- Dan Ford
email: (requires authentication)

see the Warbird's Forum at
www.warbirdforum.com
and the Piper Cub Forum at www.pipercubforum.com
 




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