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JAG and Petty Officers



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 17th 04, 01:27 AM
Jack & Bev Biagini
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Default JAG and Petty Officers

In watching JAG over the last few years, these lawyer types address Petty
Officers as Petty Officer "So and So". I had a "Crow" on my sleeve for 2
years and was never addressed as Petty Officer, nor did I ever hear anyone
else called a Petty Officer.
Of course this was back in the late 50's when female sailors were "Waves".
Is this the new and improved Navy or is it just the blackshoes?


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  #3  
Old October 17th 04, 03:55 AM
Larry
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"Jack & Bev Biagini" wrote in message
...
In watching JAG over the last few years, these lawyer types address Petty
Officers as Petty Officer "So and So". I had a "Crow" on my sleeve for 2
years and was never addressed as Petty Officer, nor did I ever hear anyone
else called a Petty Officer.
Of course this was back in the late 50's when female sailors were "Waves".
Is this the new and improved Navy or is it just the blackshoes?


They incorrectly address folks as "Petty Officer". The correct way to
address folks is "Petty Officer Jones", "Chief Nelson", Commander Rab", etc.
Junior Enlisted deserve to be addressed correctly too!


Larry
Senior Chief
USN Retired


  #4  
Old October 17th 04, 04:13 AM
Yofuri
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I don't recall any published instructions or edicts, but I recall it
becoming the accepted form in the Navy between 1970 and 1975. Before, E-6
and below were addressed by last name, CPO's as Chief, Senior Chief or
Master Chief, and officers up to LCDR were Mister.

The fastest way for a sailor to ruin his day was to address a Marine, Army
or Air Force officer as "Mister", though.

Rick

"Jack & Bev Biagini" wrote in message
...
In watching JAG over the last few years, these lawyer types address Petty
Officers as Petty Officer "So and So". I had a "Crow" on my sleeve for 2
years and was never addressed as Petty Officer, nor did I ever hear anyone
else called a Petty Officer.
Of course this was back in the late 50's when female sailors were "Waves".
Is this the new and improved Navy or is it just the blackshoes?



  #5  
Old October 17th 04, 04:47 AM
Dave in San diego
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Default

"Yofuri" wrote in
:

I don't recall any published instructions or edicts, but I recall it
becoming the accepted form in the Navy between 1970 and 1975. Before,
E-6 and below were addressed by last name, CPO's as Chief, Senior
Chief or Master Chief, and officers up to LCDR were Mister.

The fastest way for a sailor to ruin his day was to address a Marine,
Army or Air Force officer as "Mister", though.

Rick

"Jack & Bev Biagini" wrote in message
...
In watching JAG over the last few years, these lawyer types address
Petty Officers as Petty Officer "So and So". I had a "Crow" on my
sleeve for 2 years and was never addressed as Petty Officer, nor did
I ever hear anyone else called a Petty Officer.
Of course this was back in the late 50's when female sailors were
"Waves". Is this the new and improved Navy or is it just the
blackshoes?


By the time I retired in '89, last name only was out. Petty Officer by
itself, or Petty Officer [Schmuckatelli] were the "approved" forms of
address. The Marines at the gates at Miramar address everyone who comes
through by their rank - when I go through, it's "Good
morning/afternoon/evening Petty Officer", cuz they read it right off my
retired ID card. It was a little odd at first, but now I just say thank
you.

Dave in San Diego
  #6  
Old October 17th 04, 03:43 PM
T Bird
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As a 20 Yr Navy Guy . 60 to 81 . Being addressed as Petty Officer is
nothing new. But the term may have increased more during and certainly
after the Zumwalt era .

  #7  
Old October 18th 04, 02:38 AM
vincent p. norris
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The fastest way for a sailor to ruin his day was to address a Marine, Army
or Air Force officer as "Mister", though.


When I was in the marines, late 40s to mid-50s, lieutenants were
commonly addressed as "Mister." But only with the surname added,
never just plain "Mister."

IIRC, Midshipmen and perhaps Navcads in flight training were sometimes
addressed as "Mister" without a surname added.

However, it would have been a mistake to address a marine captain or
major as "Mister," even though the naval equivalents, lieutenant and
lieutenant commander, are (or were) Misters.

It was also a custom, at that time, to address officers in the third
person. The first time an enlisted man said to me, "Would the
lieutenant like a cup of coffee?" it took me a few seconds to realize
he meant ME!

vince norris
  #8  
Old October 18th 04, 04:55 AM
Yofuri
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Now that brings back fond memories!

I got into the third-person habit while an E5, and the only Navy assistant
to a Marine Captain O-in-C. When I went back to squid duty, Navy officers
looked at me like I had two heads when I did it.

I also kept a "high and tight" haircut until the fabled J. R. (Jumping Jim)
Foster chewed me out for looking like a Prussian or something. Since I had
a sincere desire to make PO1 at the time, I humored him and let it grow out.
It worked.

A later foulup (as a W1), was addressing a message to a Commander who was
O-in-C of a beachdet. That's when I learned the difference between SNA and
SENAV.

Rick

'57-'85, E1 to O4

"vincent p. norris" wrote in message
...
The fastest way for a sailor to ruin his day was to address a Marine,
Army
or Air Force officer as "Mister", though.


When I was in the marines, late 40s to mid-50s, lieutenants were
commonly addressed as "Mister." But only with the surname added,
never just plain "Mister."

IIRC, Midshipmen and perhaps Navcads in flight training were sometimes
addressed as "Mister" without a surname added.

However, it would have been a mistake to address a marine captain or
major as "Mister," even though the naval equivalents, lieutenant and
lieutenant commander, are (or were) Misters.

It was also a custom, at that time, to address officers in the third
person. The first time an enlisted man said to me, "Would the
lieutenant like a cup of coffee?" it took me a few seconds to realize
he meant ME!

vince norris



  #9  
Old October 18th 04, 06:58 PM
Mike Kanze
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Default

I don't recall seeing what Rick saw during the 1970 - 1975 period, but that
may not mean much.

In the places I was stationed, anyone below Chief was addressed simply by
their last name. Chiefs were always "Chief." "Mister" as a form of address
for Navy officers below O-5 was used increasingly infrequently, although it
was ALWAYS used for Midshipmen and officer candidates. The trend toward
addressing a superior by his / her role was becoming more pronounced ("Hey,
OPS!"). The Skipper and XO were always AT LEAST that, if not "Sir" /
"Ma'am."

One thing to remember: Donald P. Bellisario, JAG's producer, is a former
Marine. I've often suspected that much of the titular formality one
observes on JAG (and which I rarely observed during my active duty time)
comes from Bellisario's experiences in the USMC of the 1950s. Again, just
my suspicion.

--
Mike Kanze

"Sometimes I think war is God's way of teaching us geography."

- Paul Rodriguez


"Yofuri" wrote in message
...
I don't recall any published instructions or edicts, but I recall it
becoming the accepted form in the Navy between 1970 and 1975. Before, E-6
and below were addressed by last name, CPO's as Chief, Senior Chief or
Master Chief, and officers up to LCDR were Mister.

The fastest way for a sailor to ruin his day was to address a Marine, Army
or Air Force officer as "Mister", though.

Rick

"Jack & Bev Biagini" wrote in message
...
In watching JAG over the last few years, these lawyer types address Petty
Officers as Petty Officer "So and So". I had a "Crow" on my sleeve for 2
years and was never addressed as Petty Officer, nor did I ever hear
anyone else called a Petty Officer.
Of course this was back in the late 50's when female sailors were
"Waves".
Is this the new and improved Navy or is it just the blackshoes?






  #10  
Old October 24th 04, 03:41 PM
Pechs1
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Default

Jack- In watching JAG over the last few years, these lawyer types address
Petty
Officers as Petty Officer "So and So". I had a "Crow" on my sleeve for 2
years and was never addressed as Petty Officer, nor did I ever hear anyone
else called a Petty Officer. BRBR

Yep, it was 'Petty Officer Smith', not Smith...the new PC Navy. I neevr thought
I was being sligjhted when somebody called me "Mister' instead of 'Lieutenant'
or 'LIeutenant Commander'..

When I was in my first squadron(VF-33-1975), troops(E-1 thru 6) went by their
last name...not so in my last squadron(VF-126 1990-2).
P. C. Chisholm
CDR, USN(ret.)
Old Phart Phormer Phantom, Turkey, Viper, Scooter and Combat Buckeye Phlyer
 




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