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Announcing THE book on airshow flying



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 7th 04, 03:33 PM
Dudley Henriques
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Announcing THE book on airshow flying

For those of you interested in air shows, both military and civilian, , and
whose interest goes WAY beyond the norm and into the very guts of the
subject; I'd like to announce that the consummate book on this subject "Zero
Error Margin; Airshow Display Flying Analyzed " has just been released and
is now available. You will find the name and address of the publisher below
my remarks.
The book has been written by Col. Des Barker, ex member of the South African
Jet Aerobatic Team "Silver Falcons"; fixed wing test pilot, and previous
Commanding Officer of the South African Flight Test Center. Col. Barker is
also a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots, and the Royal
Aeronautical Society.
Just to give you some idea of the range of Col Barker's book, it contains
entire sections written as a textbook for those performing and thinking of
performing air show display flying; a vast and comprehensive data base of
air show accidents covering years od data , their causes, the investigative
results; and the remarks of experienced air show pilots on these accidents.
This section alone should become a legal volume suitable for use in a court
of law on the subject of air show safety.
Col. Barker enlisted the help of a team of internationally known air show
demonstration pilots both military and civilian and asked each to contribute
something of their individual expertise to the book. This section is
literally a textbook on low altitude air show demonstration flying and is
probably unique in the world in this respect.
Much effort went into this work, and I consider it the best book ever
written on these issues. So vast is the scope of Col Barker's work, that it
should be a must have for demonstration pilots both military and civilian;
every airshow enthusiast in the world; every historian even remotely
interested in airshow flying and safety; and every lawyer interested in
flight safety research connected with the air show environment.
For those interested, the book is in it's first run in South Africa and the
UK, and is being considered for a second printing.
The publisher's Information is below;
Freeworld Publications
POBox 6260
Nelspruit, 1200
South Africa

cell phone; 072 610 400
fax; 013 752 2709
e-mail

Dudley Henriques
International Fighter Pilots Fellowship
Commercial Pilot/ CFI Retired
For personal email, please replace
the z's with e's.
dhenriquesATzarthlinkDOTnzt


Ads
  #2  
Old January 8th 04, 07:08 PM
Snowbird
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message thlink.net...
For those of you interested in air shows, both military and civilian, , and
whose interest goes WAY beyond the norm and into the very guts of the
subject; I'd like to announce that the consummate book on this subject "Zero
Error Margin; Airshow Display Flying Analyzed " has just been released and
is now available. ...


Wow, this is saying a lot, coming from you. Is it anything the
'lay pilot' could appreciate, or do you think one has to be
an aerobatic pilot or an airshow performer to appreciate it?

Cheers,
Sydney
  #3  
Old January 8th 04, 09:01 PM
Dudley Henriques
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Snowbird" wrote in message
om...
"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message

thlink.net...
For those of you interested in air shows, both military and civilian, ,

and
whose interest goes WAY beyond the norm and into the very guts of the
subject; I'd like to announce that the consummate book on this subject

"Zero
Error Margin; Airshow Display Flying Analyzed " has just been released

and
is now available. ...


Wow, this is saying a lot, coming from you. Is it anything the
'lay pilot' could appreciate, or do you think one has to be
an aerobatic pilot or an airshow performer to appreciate it?

Cheers,
Sydney


The book will probably end up being the finest piece ever done on this
subject. In fact, considering it's scope, it should stand alone now as
unique. It will easily qualify as legally acceptable reference material when
expert opinion has to be verified concerning the issues dealt with in the
book.
I will have the finished book in my hands next week. As of now, I only have
the material that I've been working on with Col Barker over the past two
years, and individual chapters sent to me to be proofed, but from what I've
seen so far, for anyone having any interest at all in the safety issues that
surround the air show venue, this book will be a must have! The collected
group gathered together to do this work are in my opinion, the best
available in the world today. Just in my own small group contributing, the
book involved several Thunderbird alumni, including an ex team lead.
I really can't say what the interest will be for the average private pilot
as it relates to flying. Naturally, the collective professional talent
gathered to do this project concentrated heavily on the low level aerobatic
demonstration aspect of handling an airplane; and many makes and types used
for this purpose are covered in textbook form. But if there's an interest in
learning how extremely high performance airplanes are handled professionally
by people who are the best in the world at doing this; I would say there's a
lot that can be learned and applied to making everyday flying safer.
On the historical end, the accident data base on air shows included in the
book is second to none. It lists every major air show related accident of
consequence over several decades. Researchers will have a field day reading
what the official reports said, then being privy to what the best pilots in
the world involved with the same kind of flying had to say for the book that
ADD's to those reports.
For the enthusiast, the book should be a gold mine of first hand reporting
and research on their subject of interest.
To answer your question honestly Snow, it all depends on the interest area
of the hypothetical "lay pilot" you describe. My recommendation would be to
purchase this book if you have any interest at all in airshows, or how high
performance airplanes are flown by people who know high performance
airplanes. You'll get a real inside look at how these pilots think and act
under all kinds of conditions. I would say that by the time he/she finishes
reading this book, the average "lay pilot" should come away with at least a
few things they might want to change in the way they approach what they do
in the air :-)
Dudley Henriques
International Fighter Pilots Fellowship
Commercial Pilot/ CFI Retired
For personal email, please replace
the z's with e's.
dhenriquesATzarthlinkDOTnzt



  #4  
Old January 8th 04, 09:28 PM
EDR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Here is the reply I received to my inquiry about pricing:

----- Original Message -----
From: Eric Rood
To:
Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2004 4:52 PM
Subject: Book ordering information


Please send information on how to order the book "Zero Error Margin;
Airshow Display Flying Analyzed ".
I am located in the United States.


From: "WInston Brent"
To: "Eric Rood"
Subject: Book ordering information
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 22:24:49 -0000
X-Priority: 3

Dear Eric
Thankyou for your mail. (I am in South Africa)
Yes, it may be ordered from myself, the Publisher. ALL 328 pages on
gloss paper in A4 size.
Weighs in @ 1,7kg for HARD Cover and 1,3kg for SOFT Cover.
HARD cover copy (USD$45) or SOFT cover copy (USD$35) to choose from.
This EXCLUDES cost of postage of your choice.
Payment method also to be arranged.
regards
Winston Brent
  #5  
Old January 9th 04, 12:23 AM
ShawnD2112
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks for the heads up on this one, Dudley.

Oddly enough, am going on vacation to Capetown on Sat for two weeks. Have
asked about two copies being sent to my hotel, one for me, one for my flying
partner. We're just starting out on some basic station keeping formation
and hope to be able to put together a small show routine for Summer 05 or
so. Lots of work and lots to learn in the meantime, but we've had a blast
doing what little we've done so far.

Shawn
Pitts S-1D G-BKVP
"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message
news

"Snowbird" wrote in message
om...
"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message

thlink.net...
For those of you interested in air shows, both military and civilian,

,
and
whose interest goes WAY beyond the norm and into the very guts of the
subject; I'd like to announce that the consummate book on this subject

"Zero
Error Margin; Airshow Display Flying Analyzed " has just been released

and
is now available. ...


Wow, this is saying a lot, coming from you. Is it anything the
'lay pilot' could appreciate, or do you think one has to be
an aerobatic pilot or an airshow performer to appreciate it?

Cheers,
Sydney


The book will probably end up being the finest piece ever done on this
subject. In fact, considering it's scope, it should stand alone now as
unique. It will easily qualify as legally acceptable reference material

when
expert opinion has to be verified concerning the issues dealt with in the
book.
I will have the finished book in my hands next week. As of now, I only

have
the material that I've been working on with Col Barker over the past two
years, and individual chapters sent to me to be proofed, but from what

I've
seen so far, for anyone having any interest at all in the safety issues

that
surround the air show venue, this book will be a must have! The collected
group gathered together to do this work are in my opinion, the best
available in the world today. Just in my own small group contributing, the
book involved several Thunderbird alumni, including an ex team lead.
I really can't say what the interest will be for the average private pilot
as it relates to flying. Naturally, the collective professional talent
gathered to do this project concentrated heavily on the low level

aerobatic
demonstration aspect of handling an airplane; and many makes and types

used
for this purpose are covered in textbook form. But if there's an interest

in
learning how extremely high performance airplanes are handled

professionally
by people who are the best in the world at doing this; I would say there's

a
lot that can be learned and applied to making everyday flying safer.
On the historical end, the accident data base on air shows included in the
book is second to none. It lists every major air show related accident of
consequence over several decades. Researchers will have a field day

reading
what the official reports said, then being privy to what the best pilots

in
the world involved with the same kind of flying had to say for the book

that
ADD's to those reports.
For the enthusiast, the book should be a gold mine of first hand reporting
and research on their subject of interest.
To answer your question honestly Snow, it all depends on the interest area
of the hypothetical "lay pilot" you describe. My recommendation would be

to
purchase this book if you have any interest at all in airshows, or how

high
performance airplanes are flown by people who know high performance
airplanes. You'll get a real inside look at how these pilots think and act
under all kinds of conditions. I would say that by the time he/she

finishes
reading this book, the average "lay pilot" should come away with at least

a
few things they might want to change in the way they approach what they do
in the air :-)
Dudley Henriques
International Fighter Pilots Fellowship
Commercial Pilot/ CFI Retired
For personal email, please replace
the z's with e's.
dhenriquesATzarthlinkDOTnzt





  #6  
Old January 9th 04, 01:12 AM
Dudley Henriques
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Best of luck down there and have a great time. Hope all goes well with what
you're planning for 05.
One thing though Shawn; don't get too close to those Cape Buffs down there.
I understand that if they get mad at you for some reason or other, they can
take do great harm to a Pitts!!! :-))
Have fun and let me know how you make out with your show will you?
All the best as always,
Dudley


"ShawnD2112" wrote in message
...
Thanks for the heads up on this one, Dudley.

Oddly enough, am going on vacation to Capetown on Sat for two weeks. Have
asked about two copies being sent to my hotel, one for me, one for my

flying
partner. We're just starting out on some basic station keeping formation
and hope to be able to put together a small show routine for Summer 05 or
so. Lots of work and lots to learn in the meantime, but we've had a blast
doing what little we've done so far.

Shawn
Pitts S-1D G-BKVP
"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message
news

"Snowbird" wrote in message
om...
"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message

thlink.net...
For those of you interested in air shows, both military and

civilian,
,
and
whose interest goes WAY beyond the norm and into the very guts of

the
subject; I'd like to announce that the consummate book on this

subject
"Zero
Error Margin; Airshow Display Flying Analyzed " has just been

released
and
is now available. ...

Wow, this is saying a lot, coming from you. Is it anything the
'lay pilot' could appreciate, or do you think one has to be
an aerobatic pilot or an airshow performer to appreciate it?

Cheers,
Sydney


The book will probably end up being the finest piece ever done on this
subject. In fact, considering it's scope, it should stand alone now as
unique. It will easily qualify as legally acceptable reference material

when
expert opinion has to be verified concerning the issues dealt with in

the
book.
I will have the finished book in my hands next week. As of now, I only

have
the material that I've been working on with Col Barker over the past two
years, and individual chapters sent to me to be proofed, but from what

I've
seen so far, for anyone having any interest at all in the safety issues

that
surround the air show venue, this book will be a must have! The

collected
group gathered together to do this work are in my opinion, the best
available in the world today. Just in my own small group contributing,

the
book involved several Thunderbird alumni, including an ex team lead.
I really can't say what the interest will be for the average private

pilot
as it relates to flying. Naturally, the collective professional talent
gathered to do this project concentrated heavily on the low level

aerobatic
demonstration aspect of handling an airplane; and many makes and types

used
for this purpose are covered in textbook form. But if there's an

interest
in
learning how extremely high performance airplanes are handled

professionally
by people who are the best in the world at doing this; I would say

there's
a
lot that can be learned and applied to making everyday flying safer.
On the historical end, the accident data base on air shows included in

the
book is second to none. It lists every major air show related accident

of
consequence over several decades. Researchers will have a field day

reading
what the official reports said, then being privy to what the best pilots

in
the world involved with the same kind of flying had to say for the book

that
ADD's to those reports.
For the enthusiast, the book should be a gold mine of first hand

reporting
and research on their subject of interest.
To answer your question honestly Snow, it all depends on the interest

area
of the hypothetical "lay pilot" you describe. My recommendation would be

to
purchase this book if you have any interest at all in airshows, or how

high
performance airplanes are flown by people who know high performance
airplanes. You'll get a real inside look at how these pilots think and

act
under all kinds of conditions. I would say that by the time he/she

finishes
reading this book, the average "lay pilot" should come away with at

least
a
few things they might want to change in the way they approach what they

do
in the air :-)
Dudley Henriques
International Fighter Pilots Fellowship
Commercial Pilot/ CFI Retired
For personal email, please replace
the z's with e's.
dhenriquesATzarthlinkDOTnzt







  #7  
Old January 9th 04, 06:48 AM
ShawnD2112
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

You bet, Dudley, on both counts.

To date all we've really done is trade lead and wing, mostly echelon right,
practicing straight and level station-keeping, gentle turns left/right,
gentle climbs and decents. It's still hard enough keeping in some kind of
reasonable position that anything more challenging is still for the future.
We still fall out of turns once in a while, as you'd imagine.

Just out of curiousity, do you have any formation time in Pitts Specials?
If so, what do you use as visual references in echelon to keep your
position? We've gotten some conflicting advice about the best position.

Shawn
"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message
hlink.net...
Best of luck down there and have a great time. Hope all goes well with

what
you're planning for 05.
One thing though Shawn; don't get too close to those Cape Buffs down

there.
I understand that if they get mad at you for some reason or other, they

can
take do great harm to a Pitts!!! :-))
Have fun and let me know how you make out with your show will you?
All the best as always,
Dudley


"ShawnD2112" wrote in message
...
Thanks for the heads up on this one, Dudley.

Oddly enough, am going on vacation to Capetown on Sat for two weeks.

Have
asked about two copies being sent to my hotel, one for me, one for my

flying
partner. We're just starting out on some basic station keeping

formation
and hope to be able to put together a small show routine for Summer 05

or
so. Lots of work and lots to learn in the meantime, but we've had a

blast
doing what little we've done so far.

Shawn
Pitts S-1D G-BKVP
"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message
news

"Snowbird" wrote in message
om...
"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message
thlink.net...
For those of you interested in air shows, both military and

civilian,
,
and
whose interest goes WAY beyond the norm and into the very guts of

the
subject; I'd like to announce that the consummate book on this

subject
"Zero
Error Margin; Airshow Display Flying Analyzed " has just been

released
and
is now available. ...

Wow, this is saying a lot, coming from you. Is it anything the
'lay pilot' could appreciate, or do you think one has to be
an aerobatic pilot or an airshow performer to appreciate it?

Cheers,
Sydney

The book will probably end up being the finest piece ever done on this
subject. In fact, considering it's scope, it should stand alone now as
unique. It will easily qualify as legally acceptable reference

material
when
expert opinion has to be verified concerning the issues dealt with in

the
book.
I will have the finished book in my hands next week. As of now, I only

have
the material that I've been working on with Col Barker over the past

two
years, and individual chapters sent to me to be proofed, but from what

I've
seen so far, for anyone having any interest at all in the safety

issues
that
surround the air show venue, this book will be a must have! The

collected
group gathered together to do this work are in my opinion, the best
available in the world today. Just in my own small group contributing,

the
book involved several Thunderbird alumni, including an ex team lead.
I really can't say what the interest will be for the average private

pilot
as it relates to flying. Naturally, the collective professional talent
gathered to do this project concentrated heavily on the low level

aerobatic
demonstration aspect of handling an airplane; and many makes and types

used
for this purpose are covered in textbook form. But if there's an

interest
in
learning how extremely high performance airplanes are handled

professionally
by people who are the best in the world at doing this; I would say

there's
a
lot that can be learned and applied to making everyday flying safer.
On the historical end, the accident data base on air shows included in

the
book is second to none. It lists every major air show related accident

of
consequence over several decades. Researchers will have a field day

reading
what the official reports said, then being privy to what the best

pilots
in
the world involved with the same kind of flying had to say for the

book
that
ADD's to those reports.
For the enthusiast, the book should be a gold mine of first hand

reporting
and research on their subject of interest.
To answer your question honestly Snow, it all depends on the interest

area
of the hypothetical "lay pilot" you describe. My recommendation would

be
to
purchase this book if you have any interest at all in airshows, or how

high
performance airplanes are flown by people who know high performance
airplanes. You'll get a real inside look at how these pilots think and

act
under all kinds of conditions. I would say that by the time he/she

finishes
reading this book, the average "lay pilot" should come away with at

least
a
few things they might want to change in the way they approach what

they
do
in the air :-)
Dudley Henriques
International Fighter Pilots Fellowship
Commercial Pilot/ CFI Retired
For personal email, please replace
the z's with e's.
dhenriquesATzarthlinkDOTnzt









  #8  
Old January 9th 04, 02:27 PM
EDR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Just out of curiousity, do you have any formation time in Pitts Specials?
If so, what do you use as visual references in echelon to keep your
position? We've gotten some conflicting advice about the best position.


Hi Shawn, when flying formation, it is important to keepy your eyes
moving to detect relative motion. Stare at any one point and and you
may get sucked in to your leader.

Try this:
- wingtip on your side
- bottom rear corner of the canopy on your side
- tailwheel

Keep your eyes moving to these three points in order.
If the position of the object changes, you have relative motion and
must correct to put the object back in its original poition.
  #9  
Old January 9th 04, 03:38 PM
Dudley Henriques
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I never did formation acro in the Pitts, but I talked about it many times
with Art Scholl. I have however flown formation acro in both similar and
dissimilar aircraft using P51's and a P51/F8F pair.
Art considered formation acro in the Pitts as a common problem for all
bipes, that being a high potential for loss of sight in close.
It's dicey in tight, and that's basically where you want to be for acro, as
the lag time between lead and wing can be a real killer.
There's no substitute for working in as a team when it comes to this issue,
and if you're taking it in slowly together; that's the way to do it.
Right off the bat I'll tell you several things. Radio communication is
PARAMOUNT. The instant you lose it, you need a preplanned exit. The
Thunderbirds have a "go exploded" preplan on call by the lead; or a wing if
lead is the cause; also if no transmission from lead for a briefed time
period during a maneuver. Radio is CRITICAL to flight safety in formation
acro.
On position; the best unfortunately for acro is in fairly tight, as there
can be absolutely NO lag between lead's stick and wings'. If you are waiting
for lead to move, it's too late. ANY lag will throw you outside. Another
thing. Normal echelon acro in a low wing fighter would normally be back
about 55 degrees stepped down, and in position where the tail numbers could
be read easily. This is very similar to the old fighting wing. The Pitts
will have to be held in flatter due to the upper wing panel. You'll have to
experiment with this.
I would suggest you fly ALL maneuvers that involve roll (turn) AWAY from the
wing; in other words (turn away rather than turn into the wing) Turns into
involve some power and positioning problems that could get hairy in a Pitts.
On positioning; I've found the Thunderbird/Blue Angels approach to this
issue to be the best. They develop what is called a "paint" for each
maneuver. It naturally varies between wings and slot, but in your case, you
only have a wing "paint" to develop. What you do is establish a sight line
from your normal seated position from some spot on your airplane (I used my
canopy bow a lot for this)
directly to some chosen spot on the lead's airplane, and you KEEP IT IN THAT
EXACT POSITION come hell or high water.
This means that in effect, if you're flying the wing position, you are
literally flying the lead's airplane. When he moves, you move. You keep the
line between the paint and the spot on your airplane at all times. This is
called relative positioning. This also requires lead giving wing a specific
cadence on the radio that NEVER CHANGES on both the preparation call for the
maneuver, AND the execution call. For example; lead will call "
Ready.......going barrel roll left............now........" What's indicative
here is the SPACING between the words "left" and "now". By knowing the
spacing, wing can execute WITH the lead and not after lead's hands and feet
have moved. This is critical for acro formation integrity.
I could go on for an hour on this stuff but you'll discover it on your own
I'm sure.
Just remember; lead's job is SMOOTHNESS and GROUND PROXIMITY . Lead has to
leave wing with a little extra g and a little extra power. This also is
critical.
If lead maxes his airplane, wing doesn't have what he needs to hang in
there. Lead MUST give wing enough extra to maintain position.
Oh well, you'll get it I'm sure. If there's anything at all I can help you
with, don't hesitate to ask.

One thing Shawn; I'm fairly certain that you'll find that in the Pitts, you
are going to be flying a flatter echelon and a bit wider out than I would be
doing with a low wing fighter. This will mean an even tighter execution
window between wing and lead. The radio procedure you two develop between
you that establishes the cadence I'm talking about will be VERY important to
you with a wing out that far and being flat like that. Work on these radio
calls till they are so second nature you both could be blindfolded; make a
prep, hesitate and execute call and bang your hands down on a table at
exactly the same time together. When you two can do that twenty times with
no difference in sound when your hands hit the table; you're ready to BEGIN
practicing formation acro as a demonstration team!
Dudley
"ShawnD2112" wrote in message
...
You bet, Dudley, on both counts.

To date all we've really done is trade lead and wing, mostly echelon

right,
practicing straight and level station-keeping, gentle turns left/right,
gentle climbs and decents. It's still hard enough keeping in some kind of
reasonable position that anything more challenging is still for the

future.
We still fall out of turns once in a while, as you'd imagine.

Just out of curiousity, do you have any formation time in Pitts Specials?
If so, what do you use as visual references in echelon to keep your
position? We've gotten some conflicting advice about the best position.

Shawn
"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message
hlink.net...
Best of luck down there and have a great time. Hope all goes well with

what
you're planning for 05.
One thing though Shawn; don't get too close to those Cape Buffs down

there.
I understand that if they get mad at you for some reason or other, they

can
take do great harm to a Pitts!!! :-))
Have fun and let me know how you make out with your show will you?
All the best as always,
Dudley


"ShawnD2112" wrote in message
...
Thanks for the heads up on this one, Dudley.

Oddly enough, am going on vacation to Capetown on Sat for two weeks.

Have
asked about two copies being sent to my hotel, one for me, one for my

flying
partner. We're just starting out on some basic station keeping

formation
and hope to be able to put together a small show routine for Summer 05

or
so. Lots of work and lots to learn in the meantime, but we've had a

blast
doing what little we've done so far.

Shawn
Pitts S-1D G-BKVP
"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message
news
"Snowbird" wrote in message
om...
"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message
thlink.net...
For those of you interested in air shows, both military and

civilian,
,
and
whose interest goes WAY beyond the norm and into the very guts

of
the
subject; I'd like to announce that the consummate book on this

subject
"Zero
Error Margin; Airshow Display Flying Analyzed " has just been

released
and
is now available. ...

Wow, this is saying a lot, coming from you. Is it anything the
'lay pilot' could appreciate, or do you think one has to be
an aerobatic pilot or an airshow performer to appreciate it?

Cheers,
Sydney

The book will probably end up being the finest piece ever done on

this
subject. In fact, considering it's scope, it should stand alone now

as
unique. It will easily qualify as legally acceptable reference

material
when
expert opinion has to be verified concerning the issues dealt with

in
the
book.
I will have the finished book in my hands next week. As of now, I

only
have
the material that I've been working on with Col Barker over the past

two
years, and individual chapters sent to me to be proofed, but from

what
I've
seen so far, for anyone having any interest at all in the safety

issues
that
surround the air show venue, this book will be a must have! The

collected
group gathered together to do this work are in my opinion, the best
available in the world today. Just in my own small group

contributing,
the
book involved several Thunderbird alumni, including an ex team lead.
I really can't say what the interest will be for the average private

pilot
as it relates to flying. Naturally, the collective professional

talent
gathered to do this project concentrated heavily on the low level
aerobatic
demonstration aspect of handling an airplane; and many makes and

types
used
for this purpose are covered in textbook form. But if there's an

interest
in
learning how extremely high performance airplanes are handled
professionally
by people who are the best in the world at doing this; I would say

there's
a
lot that can be learned and applied to making everyday flying safer.
On the historical end, the accident data base on air shows included

in
the
book is second to none. It lists every major air show related

accident
of
consequence over several decades. Researchers will have a field day
reading
what the official reports said, then being privy to what the best

pilots
in
the world involved with the same kind of flying had to say for the

book
that
ADD's to those reports.
For the enthusiast, the book should be a gold mine of first hand

reporting
and research on their subject of interest.
To answer your question honestly Snow, it all depends on the

interest
area
of the hypothetical "lay pilot" you describe. My recommendation

would
be
to
purchase this book if you have any interest at all in airshows, or

how
high
performance airplanes are flown by people who know high performance
airplanes. You'll get a real inside look at how these pilots think

and
act
under all kinds of conditions. I would say that by the time he/she
finishes
reading this book, the average "lay pilot" should come away with at

least
a
few things they might want to change in the way they approach what

they
do
in the air :-)
Dudley Henriques
International Fighter Pilots Fellowship
Commercial Pilot/ CFI Retired
For personal email, please replace
the z's with e's.
dhenriquesATzarthlinkDOTnzt











  #10  
Old January 9th 04, 05:49 PM
ShawnD2112
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Dudley,
Great tips! Thanks loads. I like the idea of the synchro radio calls and
the table.

With power and g, we've kept everything pretty much one g so far and we both
recognize we're a long way from pulling any. As for power, when leading, we
each throttle back to give us about 120 mph. My plane is faster than Al's
(better prop) so he needs a lot more power margin when he's on my wing than
I do on his. 120 mph (against a cruise of 145 and full speed of 180) seems
a bit slow but is fast enough to still have good control response and plenty
of surplus power. It gives me about 2100 RPM against a 2700 red line, 2400
cruise.

For positioning, we've been maintaining about what you describe; something
that feels like 45 degrees but is probably a little bit more, and nearly
level. When I'm looking at him, I try to bisect his upper wing through it's
own trailing edge. That puts me a couple of inches higher but reduces the
risk of masking with my own upper wing. (If anyone has anything to add to
that, please let me know). It's also good because it's exact and very
apparent when you're just a little bit above or below. Also rate of
vertical relative movement is very evident. As for horizontal keeping, I
haven't yet figured out the sight picture that I need. I'm trying to use
the technique you describe (lock a point on my plane onto his), but I've
gotten conflicting advice on best position and haven't been able to stay in
one place long enough to get a point; it's more like a zone. At the moment,
as long as his airplane is within the upper triangle of my wires, that's
about as good as I can get and it seems to be about the right angle.

We're keeping it relatively short, too. Five minutes of keeping on
someone's wing is bloody hard work! I have to remind my self to relax. How
soon before I stop leaning forward in the cockpit? :-)

Anyway, will be off the net after tomorrow for a couple of weeks but plan to
fly again in mid-Feb. I'll let you know how I get on with the book and our
next sortie.

Cheers for the help!

Shawn
"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message
. net...
I never did formation acro in the Pitts, but I talked about it many times
with Art Scholl. I have however flown formation acro in both similar and
dissimilar aircraft using P51's and a P51/F8F pair.
Art considered formation acro in the Pitts as a common problem for all
bipes, that being a high potential for loss of sight in close.
It's dicey in tight, and that's basically where you want to be for acro,

as
the lag time between lead and wing can be a real killer.
There's no substitute for working in as a team when it comes to this

issue,
and if you're taking it in slowly together; that's the way to do it.
Right off the bat I'll tell you several things. Radio communication is
PARAMOUNT. The instant you lose it, you need a preplanned exit. The
Thunderbirds have a "go exploded" preplan on call by the lead; or a wing

if
lead is the cause; also if no transmission from lead for a briefed time
period during a maneuver. Radio is CRITICAL to flight safety in formation
acro.
On position; the best unfortunately for acro is in fairly tight, as there
can be absolutely NO lag between lead's stick and wings'. If you are

waiting
for lead to move, it's too late. ANY lag will throw you outside. Another
thing. Normal echelon acro in a low wing fighter would normally be back
about 55 degrees stepped down, and in position where the tail numbers

could
be read easily. This is very similar to the old fighting wing. The Pitts
will have to be held in flatter due to the upper wing panel. You'll have

to
experiment with this.
I would suggest you fly ALL maneuvers that involve roll (turn) AWAY from

the
wing; in other words (turn away rather than turn into the wing) Turns into
involve some power and positioning problems that could get hairy in a

Pitts.
On positioning; I've found the Thunderbird/Blue Angels approach to this
issue to be the best. They develop what is called a "paint" for each
maneuver. It naturally varies between wings and slot, but in your case,

you
only have a wing "paint" to develop. What you do is establish a sight line
from your normal seated position from some spot on your airplane (I used

my
canopy bow a lot for this)
directly to some chosen spot on the lead's airplane, and you KEEP IT IN

THAT
EXACT POSITION come hell or high water.
This means that in effect, if you're flying the wing position, you are
literally flying the lead's airplane. When he moves, you move. You keep

the
line between the paint and the spot on your airplane at all times. This is
called relative positioning. This also requires lead giving wing a

specific
cadence on the radio that NEVER CHANGES on both the preparation call for

the
maneuver, AND the execution call. For example; lead will call "
Ready.......going barrel roll left............now........" What's

indicative
here is the SPACING between the words "left" and "now". By knowing the
spacing, wing can execute WITH the lead and not after lead's hands and

feet
have moved. This is critical for acro formation integrity.
I could go on for an hour on this stuff but you'll discover it on your own
I'm sure.
Just remember; lead's job is SMOOTHNESS and GROUND PROXIMITY . Lead has to
leave wing with a little extra g and a little extra power. This also is
critical.
If lead maxes his airplane, wing doesn't have what he needs to hang in
there. Lead MUST give wing enough extra to maintain position.
Oh well, you'll get it I'm sure. If there's anything at all I can help you
with, don't hesitate to ask.

One thing Shawn; I'm fairly certain that you'll find that in the Pitts,

you
are going to be flying a flatter echelon and a bit wider out than I would

be
doing with a low wing fighter. This will mean an even tighter execution
window between wing and lead. The radio procedure you two develop between
you that establishes the cadence I'm talking about will be VERY important

to
you with a wing out that far and being flat like that. Work on these radio
calls till they are so second nature you both could be blindfolded; make a
prep, hesitate and execute call and bang your hands down on a table at
exactly the same time together. When you two can do that twenty times with
no difference in sound when your hands hit the table; you're ready to

BEGIN
practicing formation acro as a demonstration team!
Dudley
"ShawnD2112" wrote in message
...
You bet, Dudley, on both counts.

To date all we've really done is trade lead and wing, mostly echelon

right,
practicing straight and level station-keeping, gentle turns left/right,
gentle climbs and decents. It's still hard enough keeping in some kind

of
reasonable position that anything more challenging is still for the

future.
We still fall out of turns once in a while, as you'd imagine.

Just out of curiousity, do you have any formation time in Pitts

Specials?
If so, what do you use as visual references in echelon to keep your
position? We've gotten some conflicting advice about the best position.

Shawn
"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message
hlink.net...
Best of luck down there and have a great time. Hope all goes well with

what
you're planning for 05.
One thing though Shawn; don't get too close to those Cape Buffs down

there.
I understand that if they get mad at you for some reason or other,

they
can
take do great harm to a Pitts!!! :-))
Have fun and let me know how you make out with your show will you?
All the best as always,
Dudley


"ShawnD2112" wrote in message
...
Thanks for the heads up on this one, Dudley.

Oddly enough, am going on vacation to Capetown on Sat for two weeks.

Have
asked about two copies being sent to my hotel, one for me, one for

my
flying
partner. We're just starting out on some basic station keeping

formation
and hope to be able to put together a small show routine for Summer

05
or
so. Lots of work and lots to learn in the meantime, but we've had a

blast
doing what little we've done so far.

Shawn
Pitts S-1D G-BKVP
"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message
news
"Snowbird" wrote in message
om...
"Dudley Henriques" wrote in message
thlink.net...
For those of you interested in air shows, both military and
civilian,
,
and
whose interest goes WAY beyond the norm and into the very guts

of
the
subject; I'd like to announce that the consummate book on this
subject
"Zero
Error Margin; Airshow Display Flying Analyzed " has just been
released
and
is now available. ...

Wow, this is saying a lot, coming from you. Is it anything the
'lay pilot' could appreciate, or do you think one has to be
an aerobatic pilot or an airshow performer to appreciate it?

Cheers,
Sydney

The book will probably end up being the finest piece ever done on

this
subject. In fact, considering it's scope, it should stand alone

now
as
unique. It will easily qualify as legally acceptable reference

material
when
expert opinion has to be verified concerning the issues dealt with

in
the
book.
I will have the finished book in my hands next week. As of now, I

only
have
the material that I've been working on with Col Barker over the

past
two
years, and individual chapters sent to me to be proofed, but from

what
I've
seen so far, for anyone having any interest at all in the safety

issues
that
surround the air show venue, this book will be a must have! The
collected
group gathered together to do this work are in my opinion, the

best
available in the world today. Just in my own small group

contributing,
the
book involved several Thunderbird alumni, including an ex team

lead.
I really can't say what the interest will be for the average

private
pilot
as it relates to flying. Naturally, the collective professional

talent
gathered to do this project concentrated heavily on the low level
aerobatic
demonstration aspect of handling an airplane; and many makes and

types
used
for this purpose are covered in textbook form. But if there's an
interest
in
learning how extremely high performance airplanes are handled
professionally
by people who are the best in the world at doing this; I would say
there's
a
lot that can be learned and applied to making everyday flying

safer.
On the historical end, the accident data base on air shows

included
in
the
book is second to none. It lists every major air show related

accident
of
consequence over several decades. Researchers will have a field

day
reading
what the official reports said, then being privy to what the best

pilots
in
the world involved with the same kind of flying had to say for the

book
that
ADD's to those reports.
For the enthusiast, the book should be a gold mine of first hand
reporting
and research on their subject of interest.
To answer your question honestly Snow, it all depends on the

interest
area
of the hypothetical "lay pilot" you describe. My recommendation

would
be
to
purchase this book if you have any interest at all in airshows, or

how
high
performance airplanes are flown by people who know high

performance
airplanes. You'll get a real inside look at how these pilots think

and
act
under all kinds of conditions. I would say that by the time he/she
finishes
reading this book, the average "lay pilot" should come away with

at
least
a
few things they might want to change in the way they approach what

they
do
in the air :-)
Dudley Henriques
International Fighter Pilots Fellowship
Commercial Pilot/ CFI Retired
For personal email, please replace
the z's with e's.
dhenriquesATzarthlinkDOTnzt













 




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