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  #1  
Old July 2nd 03, 12:19 PM
The Raven
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Default Restoring bubbles...

"Dick" wrote in message
m...
Would you have a brand name or source for that polishing compound. I agree
Micromesh is too expensive.


Tamiya "Compound" comes in a small tube and is ideal for polishing the paint
and clear plastic windows of model aircraft/cars etc. For a 1:1 helicopter
it may be expensive (lots of tubes) but you may find it's good for the final
polishing.

Another alternative is 3M glaze (a liquid polish). When a car is painted
(non- 2pak paints) it is often used as a mild rubbing compound to smooth out
the final finish. Applied by hand it would have just enough "grit" to
remove the buildup on your canopy without chewing into the perspex.

Of course, check it's compatible with perspex first (I believe it is)!

I suspect a number of various quality car polishes would sort out your
problem. Meguiars also comes to mind and it comes in a a huge variety of
"fineness/grits".

Regards

--
The Raven
http://www.80scartoons.co.uk/batfinkquote.mp3
** President of the ozemail.* and uunet.* NG's
** since August 15th 2000.


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  #2  
Old July 2nd 03, 06:39 PM
Orval Fairbairn
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Default

In article ,
"The Raven" wrote:

"Dick" wrote in message
m...
Would you have a brand name or source for that polishing compound. I agree
Micromesh is too expensive.


Tamiya "Compound" comes in a small tube and is ideal for polishing the paint
and clear plastic windows of model aircraft/cars etc. For a 1:1 helicopter
it may be expensive (lots of tubes) but you may find it's good for the final
polishing.

Another alternative is 3M glaze (a liquid polish). When a car is painted
(non- 2pak paints) it is often used as a mild rubbing compound to smooth out
the final finish. Applied by hand it would have just enough "grit" to
remove the buildup on your canopy without chewing into the perspex.

Of course, check it's compatible with perspex first (I believe it is)!

I suspect a number of various quality car polishes would sort out your
problem. Meguiars also comes to mind and it comes in a a huge variety of
"fineness/grits".

Regards


3M Finesse It and Prefect It are generally used with a buffer and work
very well. I have also used plain old DuPont rubbing and polishing
compounds. They are all compatible with plastic and will polish out the
scratches. Basically, they are just a fine-grit (pumice) in a mineral
spirits-based suspension.

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  #3  
Old July 6th 03, 03:28 PM
Wright1902Glider
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What type of helicopter are you restoring?

Just wondering,
Harry
  #4  
Old July 7th 03, 03:15 AM
Wright1902Glider
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Thank God its not gonna fly!

To hear my Dad tell it (was a mech. on 500-C's in the early 70's), the thing
was hell to work on. I don't remember his entire story, but it involved
repeatedly cursing the exhaust stack, and the anti-vibrational rubber mounted
extra-long screws everywhere. Good luck gettin' your plexi clean.

Harry
  #5  
Old July 7th 03, 06:07 PM
Richard Lamb
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So far, that's what I've been doing...
AND one small spot is almost completely clear.

It's going to take some time and elbow grease.

Thanks all

Richard

The Raven wrote:

"Dick" wrote in message
m...
Would you have a brand name or source for that polishing compound. I agree
Micromesh is too expensive.


Tamiya "Compound" comes in a small tube and is ideal for polishing the paint
and clear plastic windows of model aircraft/cars etc. For a 1:1 helicopter
it may be expensive (lots of tubes) but you may find it's good for the final
polishing.

Another alternative is 3M glaze (a liquid polish). When a car is painted
(non- 2pak paints) it is often used as a mild rubbing compound to smooth out
the final finish. Applied by hand it would have just enough "grit" to
remove the buildup on your canopy without chewing into the perspex.

Of course, check it's compatible with perspex first (I believe it is)!

I suspect a number of various quality car polishes would sort out your
problem. Meguiars also comes to mind and it comes in a a huge variety of
"fineness/grits".

Regards

--
The Raven
http://www.80scartoons.co.uk/batfinkquote.mp3
** President of the ozemail.* and uunet.* NG's
** since August 15th 2000.

 




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