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Sheepskin seat covers save life.



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 25th 03, 02:59 AM
Kevin
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Default Sheepskin seat covers save life.

On March 2 1991 a Piper Aztec , N6546Y slammed into the top of Justice
mountain located in North Georgia. Both wings were sheared off by 100
foot high pine trees which took much of the impact force. The fuselage
remained mostly intact from the panel aft. The pilot was trapped in the
cockpit with broken bones. He was able to wrap up in the sheepskin seat
covers in the plane to stay warm. Night time temperatures in the
mountains that time of year are in the low 30ís. Had it not been for the
seat covers he probably would have died from exposure. He was also lucky
because the wreckage lay right across the Appalachian trial, where he
was discovered by hikers before sun up who heard moaning as they walked
the trail and went to investigate. One stayed with him as the others
went forhelp. The pilot did survive the crash.

Many planes have crashed into the North Georgia mountians, this is the
only one I can recall that lived through it.

Keep those seat covers.

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  #2  
Old November 25th 03, 03:03 AM
Jay Honeck
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Default

Keep those seat covers.

Actually, we keep cold-weather survival gear in the plane all winter.

With temps already in the low-teens, it's a necessity.
--
Jay Honeck
Iowa City, IA
Pathfinder N56993
www.AlexisParkInn.com
"Your Aviation Destination"


  #3  
Old November 25th 03, 03:18 AM
BTIZ
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Default

depending on how injured you are.. you may not be able to reach your
survival gear..

BT

"Jay Honeck" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s01...
Keep those seat covers.


Actually, we keep cold-weather survival gear in the plane all winter.

With temps already in the low-teens, it's a necessity.
--
Jay Honeck
Iowa City, IA
Pathfinder N56993
www.AlexisParkInn.com
"Your Aviation Destination"




  #4  
Old November 25th 03, 05:29 AM
Carl Ellis
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Default

I know an Alaskan bush pilot who said "what you have in your pockets and on
your back are your survival kit, anything else is extra".

- Carl -

"BTIZ" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
depending on how injured you are.. you may not be able to reach your
survival gear..

BT

"Jay Honeck" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s01...
Keep those seat covers.


Actually, we keep cold-weather survival gear in the plane all winter.

With temps already in the low-teens, it's a necessity.
--
Jay Honeck
Iowa City, IA
Pathfinder N56993
www.AlexisParkInn.com
"Your Aviation Destination"






---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.543 / Virus Database: 337 - Release Date: 11/21/2003


  #5  
Old November 25th 03, 01:32 PM
Steve Robertson
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Default

Seems to me that flying at the proper altitude would be a better survival
tactic than installing sheepskin seat covers.

Best regards,

Steve Robertson
N4732J 1967 Beechcraft A23-24

Kevin wrote:

On March 2 1991 a Piper Aztec , N6546Y slammed into the top of Justice
mountain located in North Georgia. Both wings were sheared off by 100
foot high pine trees which took much of the impact force. The fuselage
remained mostly intact from the panel aft. The pilot was trapped in the
cockpit with broken bones. He was able to wrap up in the sheepskin seat
covers in the plane to stay warm. Night time temperatures in the
mountains that time of year are in the low 30ís. Had it not been for the
seat covers he probably would have died from exposure. He was also lucky
because the wreckage lay right across the Appalachian trial, where he
was discovered by hikers before sun up who heard moaning as they walked
the trail and went to investigate. One stayed with him as the others
went forhelp. The pilot did survive the crash.

Many planes have crashed into the North Georgia mountians, this is the
only one I can recall that lived through it.

Keep those seat covers.


  #6  
Old November 25th 03, 01:46 PM
Kevin
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Default

Steve Robertson wrote:
Seems to me that flying at the proper altitude would be a better survival
tactic than installing sheepskin seat covers.

Best regards,

Steve Robertson
N4732J 1967 Beechcraft A23-24

Kevin wrote:

Amen .


On March 2 1991 a Piper Aztec , N6546Y slammed into the top of Justice
mountain located in North Georgia. Both wings were sheared off by 100
foot high pine trees which took much of the impact force. The fuselage
remained mostly intact from the panel aft. The pilot was trapped in the
cockpit with broken bones. He was able to wrap up in the sheepskin seat
covers in the plane to stay warm. Night time temperatures in the
mountains that time of year are in the low 30ís. Had it not been for the
seat covers he probably would have died from exposure. He was also lucky
because the wreckage lay right across the Appalachian trial, where he
was discovered by hikers before sun up who heard moaning as they walked
the trail and went to investigate. One stayed with him as the others
went forhelp. The pilot did survive the crash.

Many planes have crashed into the North Georgia mountians, this is the
only one I can recall that lived through it.

Keep those seat covers.


NTSB Identification: ATL91LA062 . The docket is stored on NTSB microfiche number 44372.

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, March 01, 1991 in SUCHES, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 3/31/93
Aircraft: PIPER PA-23-250, registration: N6546Y
Injuries: 1 Serious.

THE PRIVATE PILOT WAS IN IMC AT 7,000 FEET MSL AND ABOUT 30 MINUTES INTO HIS
FLIGHT WHEN HE REPORTED A COMPLETE ELECTRICAL FAILURE.
HE BEGAN TO ACCOMPLISH LOST COMM PROCEDURES AND ATTEMPTED TO MAINTAIN
HIS LAST ASSIGNED
HEADING, AIRSPEED, AND ALTITUDE. HE REPORTED NO PROBLEMS WITH HIS ENGINES,
PITOT STATIC SYSTEM OR VACUUM POWERED FLIGHT INSTRUMENTS. HE
REMEMBERED THE
AIRPLANE STRIKING TREE LIMBS, BUT COULD REMEMBER NOTHING AFTER THAT
UNTIL THE AIRPLANE HAD CRASHED ONTO THE TERRAIN. THE ELEVATION AT THE
CRASH SITE WAS ABOUT 3,100 FEET MSL. THE PILOT COULD NOT EXPLAIN WHY HE
LOST 3,900 FEET OF ALTITUDE PRIOR TO THE CRASH. HE DID NOT REPORT A
LIGHTNING STRIKE,
AND HE WAS IN IMC UNTIL IMPACT. THE REASON FOR THE LOSS OFF ELECTRICAL
POWER
WAS NOT DETERMINED.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s)
of this accident as follows: THE PILOT'S FAILURE TO MAINTAIN ALTITUDE
DURING
CRUISE FLIGHT AFTER LOSS OF ELECTRICAL

  #7  
Old November 25th 03, 09:51 PM
EDR
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Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Carl Ellis
wrote:

I know an Alaskan bush pilot who said "what you have in your pockets and on
your back are your survival kit, anything else is extra".


Similarly, I have read much of the Vietnam era books by
fast-/slow-mover and helo drivers. Their saying was, "if it isn't on
you, it won't get out of the aircraft with you. I have started wearing
a fishing vest with the basics stashed in the pockets.
  #8  
Old November 26th 03, 01:47 AM
Tom S.
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Default


"Steve Robertson" wrote in message
...
Seems to me that flying at the proper altitude would be a better survival
tactic than installing sheepskin seat covers.


Nothing gets past you.


  #9  
Old November 26th 03, 01:49 AM
Tom S.
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Kevin" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s03...
CRASH SITE WAS ABOUT 3,100 FEET MSL. THE PILOT COULD NOT EXPLAIN WHY HE
LOST 3,900 FEET OF ALTITUDE PRIOR TO THE CRASH. HE DID NOT REPORT A
LIGHTNING STRIKE,
AND HE WAS IN IMC UNTIL IMPACT. THE REASON FOR THE LOSS OFF ELECTRICAL
POWER
WAS NOT DETERMINED.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s)
of this accident as follows: THE PILOT'S FAILURE TO MAINTAIN ALTITUDE
DURING
CRUISE FLIGHT AFTER LOSS OF ELECTRICAL


I always get a kick out of the FAA determinations: the pilots failure to
keep maintain flight after wing fell off...


  #10  
Old November 26th 03, 03:22 PM
Tony Cox
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Default


"Tom S." wrote in message
...


I always get a kick out of the FAA determinations: the pilots failure to
keep maintain flight after wing fell off...



I've noticed that too. About 10 years back they were very anti-pilot,
but now they are a bit more realistic. Did some old crust retire?


--
Dr. Tony Cox
Citrus Controls Inc.
e-mail:
http://CitrusControls.com/


 




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