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Do you always have oxygen?



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 13th 06, 07:45 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Mxsmanic
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Default Do you always have oxygen?

I am curious to know how many GA pilots always have oxygen on board,
even if they don't normally fly at high altitudes. It seems like it
would be good to have around, but I don't know how much it costs. Do
oxygen systems have to be frequently topped off or inspected or
measured? Do they just consist of masks for passengers and pilots to
wear?

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  #2  
Old November 13th 06, 08:21 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Steve Foley
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Default Do you always have oxygen?

"Mxsmanic" wrote in message
...
I am curious to know how many GA pilots always have oxygen on board,


It would be pretty hard to breathe if there was no oxygen on board.


  #3  
Old November 13th 06, 08:40 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Jose[_1_]
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Default Do you always have oxygen?

I am curious to know how many GA pilots always have oxygen on board,

I don't, and suspect that most span canners don't. Oxygen starts to be
required above 12,500 in some cases, and is always required above 14,000
(unless it's a pressurized airplane). Most spam canners probably fly a
few thousand to ten thousand feet MSL.

It's been reported that for some, especially at night, altitudes above
5000 feet cause noticable impairment. Nonin makes a fingertip device
(pulse oxymeter) to measure blood oxygen saturation. I'm curious myself
as to what my readings would be. However, it's a $300 device, and I
don't often fly that high anyway.

Jose
--
"Never trust anything that can think for itself, if you can't see where
it keeps its brain." (chapter 10 of book 3 - Harry Potter).
for Email, make the obvious change in the address.
  #4  
Old November 13th 06, 08:59 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Steve Foley
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Posts: 563
Default Do you always have oxygen?

"Jose" wrote in message
et...
I am curious to know how many GA pilots always have oxygen on board,


I don't, and suspect that most span canners don't.


How do you remove the oxygen from the air in your cabin?


  #5  
Old November 13th 06, 09:15 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Sylvain
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Posts: 400
Default Do you always have oxygen?

Jose wrote:

It's been reported that for some, especially at night, altitudes above
5000 feet cause noticable impairment.


I didn't really believe it either until I bought a portable system and
experimented at night; the difference is indeed noticeable (and I am not a
smoker); even when not flying high, it also makes a noticeable difference
I noticed on long cross country flights (you arrived much less tired at
the end)

I bought the system after coming back from a high altitude
training at Beale AFB and I would recommend this training to any pilot:

http://www.faa.gov/pilots/training/a...ce_physiology/

Nonin makes a fingertip device

(pulse oxymeter) to measure blood oxygen saturation. I'm curious myself
as to what my readings would be. However, it's a $300 device, and I
don't often fly that high anyway.


You now find devices -- different brand called Check Mate -- for half
that price. Refilling costs varies considerably from one location to
another one;

--Sylvain
  #6  
Old November 13th 06, 09:26 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Stefan
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Posts: 578
Default Do you always have oxygen?

Sylvain schrieb:

You now find devices -- different brand called Check Mate -- for half
that price.


This one?
http://www.spytechs.com/equipment_other/checkmate.htm
  #7  
Old November 13th 06, 09:28 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Blanche
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Posts: 346
Default Do you always have oxygen?

Mxsmanic wrote:
I am curious to know how many GA pilots always have oxygen on board,
even if they don't normally fly at high altitudes. It seems like it
would be good to have around, but I don't know how much it costs. Do
oxygen systems have to be frequently topped off or inspected or
measured? Do they just consist of masks for passengers and pilots to
wear?


Per FAA and other rules, O2 containers must be checked and certified
every 5 years. Refilling the tank varies depending on the FBO doing
the refill.

Oddly enough, I am unable to have the tank refilled at a medical
supply shop because I don't have a prescription for O2.

www.mhoxygen.com
www.aerox.com
www.c-f-c.com/supportdocs/abo1.htm
www.aviationoxygen.com

for details.

  #8  
Old November 13th 06, 09:29 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Sylvain
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Posts: 400
Default Do you always have oxygen?

Stefan wrote:

Sylvain schrieb:

You now find devices -- different brand called Check Mate -- for half
that price.


This one?
http://www.spytechs.com/equipment_other/checkmate.htm


:-) the importance of picking the right name for a product :-)

--Sylvain
  #9  
Old November 13th 06, 09:34 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Robert M. Gary
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Posts: 2,767
Default Do you always have oxygen?


Mxsmanic wrote:
I am curious to know how many GA pilots always have oxygen on board,
even if they don't normally fly at high altitudes. It seems like it
would be good to have around, but I don't know how much it costs. Do
oxygen systems have to be frequently topped off or inspected or
measured? Do they just consist of masks for passengers and pilots to
wear?


I usually do. Many of the rental planes keep a bottle in the back too.
I have a large bottle I bring for the family 4 place, but also a
smaller, more manageble bottle with just one port for myself in the
Mooney. Any cross country requires O2 durnig the day and most any
flight outside the pattern at night requires O2. One of the planning
items to consider when traveling is the cost of O2 refill. I've paid as
little as $20 and as much at $130 (quantity doesn't make any
difference, they're charging you labor to pour it). Typically the Jet
Centers in the SW have the best prices.

-Robert

  #10  
Old November 13th 06, 09:36 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Jose[_1_]
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Posts: 1,632
Default Do you always have oxygen?

How do you remove the oxygen from the air in your cabin?

By breathing.

Jose
--
"Never trust anything that can think for itself, if you can't see where
it keeps its brain." (chapter 10 of book 3 - Harry Potter).
for Email, make the obvious change in the address.
 




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