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First 2 1/2 hours PPL(H) today!



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 7th 05, 05:50 PM
Simon Robbins
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Default First 2 1/2 hours PPL(H) today!

Today I started an intensive PPL(H) course. (I'm going to fly three times a
week, two hours a day.)

I did an hours trial lesson last year in an R22 which I enjoyed immensely
and cemented my determination to learn to fly these bizarre contraptions.

Finally, nearly a year later I've got the finances sorted out and I'm going
for it. (I'm actually supposed to be in the US doing a full CPL course, but
I couldn't sell my house in time so had to drop the place.) So I'm doing
the JAA PPL(H) in the UK as a first step before deciding on my next course
of action.

My nearest school flies Schweizer 300CBs, so I'm doing my PPL(H) on them. I
know everybody's got their views on the pro and cons of this compared to the
R22 but in the end for me it came down to local convenience.

So, it's a fine Oxfordshire autumn morning and I turn up for the first
lesson, hoping to get a second in today if there's an aircraft's available.
The sun's out, wind is 5 kts, and barring a bit of low haze it looks like
it's going to be a nice day.

The instructor does the initial pre-flight, startup and climb-out to the
west as I shadow him on the checklists and controls. We rise through a
turbulent layer (could be a small temperature inversion as the haze is
suddenly clear), and it's over to me for control familiarisation. Cyclic is
instantly familiar, and I do some turns while trying to keep the airspeed
constant by adjusting the nose attitude. Not too bad, but the instructor
knows I've a lot of r/c heli, a few hours of fixed-wing, and a lot of sim
time.

Next I'm given the collective and make the power adjustments as the
instructor demos climbs and descents. Easy enough. Then I've got the
pedals and things are a little more complicated. As the instructor changes
the power I'm having to compensate on the anti-torque, at this point
over-correcting and occasionally getting into a bit of a yawing oscillation,
but I get it under control. I try a bit of control co-ordination. I can see
it's going to be a challenge mastering them all at once, throughout the
flight envelope.

We land, grab a sarnie and de-brief. He's happy, says I did really well. I
didn't find any of it too taxing, and I've still got a grin on my face 20
minutes later.

The 300's free until late afternoon, so we head out again. This time I do
the checklists and startup, and do the pick-up to where we're light on the
skids. The instructor hover-taxies us out across the active to the heli
practice area on the field, and from there takes us west again away from the
airport. This is where it got interesting! I did turns again, this time
handling the collective, pedals and throttle on my own. Happy with that we
then did climbs and descents, again with me do al the attitude, power, trim
inputs, overspeeding the engine a few times! I'm not having trouble with
knowing what inputs I need to make, the difficulty is knowing how much I
need to do and learning the "feel" for the machine. A couple of times I had
to think twice about which way the throttle works, and it caught me out at
least once when I lowered the collective, and the throttle and the engine
rpm increased, and I reacted by twisting the wrong way. No hassle though,
only slightly above the red, and I corrected once I'm mentally kiced myself.

Climbs and descents went well, so on to climbing and descending turns. This
was 2 hours into the days flying and I was starting to feel a bit full.
Still as enthusiastic as hell, but I began to realise the values of breaks
to let it all sink in. Still, I got the hang of them, and got to the point
where I don't need to think attitude, power, trim, and just do it, otherwise
I too busy thinking about the order in which to do things rather than
watching what's actually happening.

Anyway, back to base for a coffee and debrief again. The instructor thinks
I did really well and reckons if I do 4 to 5 hours a week I should breeze
through it. Not sure how much of that is genuine, and how much is
encouragement to a newbie, but I came away pleased with myself.
Unfortunately, I can't go up again until next Wednesday due to other
commitments, and I can't wait!!

Si


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  #2  
Old September 8th 05, 02:40 AM
boB
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Default

Simon Robbins wrote:

Today I started an intensive PPL(H) course. (I'm going to fly three times a
week, two hours a day.)

I did an hours trial lesson last year in an R22 which I enjoyed immensely
and cemented my determination to learn to fly these bizarre contraptions.

My nearest school flies Schweizer 300CBs, so I'm doing my PPL(H) on them. I
know everybody's got their views on the pro and cons of this compared to the
R22 but in the end for me it came down to local convenience.



The 300 is the aircraft I began in. Love it.

Happy with that we
then did climbs and descents, again with me do al the attitude, power, trim
inputs, overspeeding the engine a few times! I'm not having trouble with
knowing what inputs I need to make, the difficulty is knowing how much I
need to do and learning the "feel" for the machine.


Thank goodness for the overspeed governor. There were some that did the
same on their first solo. Picking the 300 up and accidentally adding
too much throttle. When the overspeed gov kicks the rpm back down the
student easily got confused and rolled the throttle the wrong way so the
aircraft was kicking around all over the sky. But somehow the ones we
watched were able to get the 300 back on the ground, where the
instructor climbed back in for some more hover work.

A couple of times I had
to think twice about which way the throttle works, and it caught me out at
least once when I lowered the collective, and the throttle and the engine
rpm increased, and I reacted by twisting the wrong way.


Many that drive motorcycles had a hard time getting used to the 300's
throttle direction.

The instructor thinks
I did really well and reckons if I do 4 to 5 hours a week I should breeze
through it. Not sure how much of that is genuine, and how much is
encouragement to a newbie, but I came away pleased with myself.
Unfortunately, I can't go up again until next Wednesday due to other
commitments, and I can't wait!!

Si



Usually an instructor will give some positive feedback to the student
but they would never say that you should "breeze through it" unless they
meant it. So it sounds very good for you.... AAkkk, today is Wednesday,
how did it go??????

--

boB,
SAG 70

U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)
  #3  
Old September 8th 05, 02:53 AM
Steve R
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I know that it give me fits at first, in the little bit of instruction I've
received in helicopters. Adding throttle is opposite of what it is on a
motorcycle. It's also the wrong hand which I think, actually helped me a
bit. Since I'm not used to operating the throttle with my left hand, the
fact that the throttle's movement was also backwards didn't seem to be as
big a deal as it might have been if I'd had the collective in my right hand.

FWIW! :-)
Fly Safe,
Steve R.


"boB" wrote in message
.. .

Many that drive motorcycles had a hard time getting used to the 300's
throttle direction.


boB,
SAG 70

U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)



  #4  
Old September 8th 05, 06:49 PM
Simon Robbins
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"Steve R" wrote in message
...
I know that it give me fits at first, in the little bit of instruction

I've
received in helicopters. Adding throttle is opposite of what it is on a
motorcycle. It's also the wrong hand which I think, actually helped me a
bit. Since I'm not used to operating the throttle with my left hand, the
fact that the throttle's movement was also backwards didn't seem to be as
big a deal as it might have been if I'd had the collective in my right

hand.

Actually, I don't have to think about which way to turn the throttle until
some other effect does the opposite to what I'm expecting with the engine
RPM. It's bloody awkward trying to turn it the wrong way when raising the
collective, so despite my motorcycle history, I'm hoping it wont give me too
much trouble!

Si


  #5  
Old September 8th 05, 06:50 PM
Simon Robbins
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"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net wrote in
message ...
So, can we count on a blow-by-blow of your progress like I did with my
PPH?? That would be very cool to read another's experiences as he
trains.


Well, I'd like to think I could do that, but to be honest I doubt I'll
remember my lessons in quite as much detail as you did, (i.e. how many
sugars Q has in his coffee, etc!) But I'll try. It was funny when I was
writing that report, I struggled to remember the exact exercises I'd done in
the morning and what in the afternoon. It just all kind of blended
together.

Si


  #6  
Old September 8th 05, 07:18 PM
Simon Robbins
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Default

"boB" wrote in message
.. .
Usually an instructor will give some positive feedback to the student
but they would never say that you should "breeze through it" unless they
meant it. So it sounds very good for you....


Well, I'm keeping my fingers crossed, but I know there'll be times when
something just doesn't come together and I struggle. I'm doing this for the
challenge, so to be honest, that's what I want!

The hardest part for me is probably going to be doing all the study that JAA
insists on. I'm not good at studying anymore. My day job is all sitting
down, thinking and concentrating hard, so I don't have a lot of mental
energy left at the end of the day. And I hope sooner or later that the
gibberish I hear over the headphones begins to sound legible, cos it doesn't
at the moment!

Si


  #7  
Old September 9th 05, 04:34 PM
Beav
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"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net wrote in
message ...
On Thu, 8 Sep 2005 18:50:54 +0100, "Simon Robbins"
wrote:

"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net wrote in
message ...
So, can we count on a blow-by-blow of your progress like I did with my
PPH?? That would be very cool to read another's experiences as he
trains.


Well, I'd like to think I could do that, but to be honest I doubt I'll
remember my lessons in quite as much detail as you did, (i.e. how many
sugars Q has in his coffee, etc!) But I'll try. It was funny when I was
writing that report, I struggled to remember the exact exercises I'd done
in
the morning and what in the afternoon. It just all kind of blended
together.


hehe, I'd forgotten about Q's coffee. Dunno where he is anymore.
Rumor has it he up and quit a few weeks ago.


Probably got an earful off a student that didn't take to him:-))

Don't know for sure 'cuz
I haven't been at that school since April.


So, you're a "Love 'em and leave 'em" type of guy eh? Get what you can, then
cast 'em aside like so much flotsam. :-))


--
Beav

Reply to "beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com" (with the obvious
changes)





  #8  
Old September 9th 05, 07:14 PM
Jim Carriere
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The OTHER Kevin in San Diego wrote:
I forgot to mention this when I posted my responses last night. Flash
Cards. They helped me tremendously. I picked up about a thousand 3x5
cards (Dunno what the metric equivalent is. grin) and started
writing questions on one side and the answers on the back.

I'd have my kids quiz me in the car, at dinner, wherever we were. My
10 year old learned almost as much as I did. heheh

I'm well into my 2nd stack of a thousand cards as I do my instrument
and commercial work...


This is a great way to memorize a lot of facts in a little bit of time.

A dry-erase board complements flash cards as a study tool.
Especially if you need to draw diagrams from memory, practice them on
the dry erase, compare to your text book and see what you got right
and wrong, and repeat as necessary.
  #9  
Old September 10th 05, 12:44 PM
Simon Robbins
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"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net wrote in
message ...
Wow! Only need 200 here in the states... I might have to get hold of
the 2005 regs for your part of the planet and see how they compare to
ours..


The regs on licences and priveledges are abbreviated he
www.caa.co.uk/docs/33/LASORS.PDF
Lasors is the bible for UK pilots.

Si


  #10  
Old September 11th 05, 01:14 AM
Beav
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"The OTHER Kevin in San Diego" skiddz "AT" adelphia "DOT" net wrote in
message ...
On Fri, 9 Sep 2005 16:34:57 +0100, "Beav"
wrote:


hehe, I'd forgotten about Q's coffee. Dunno where he is anymore.
Rumor has it he up and quit a few weeks ago.


Probably got an earful off a student that didn't take to him:-))


Dunno the whole story and the bits and pieces of what I am hearing
seem to indicate there was a falling out with management. (Not
surprising since that's exactly why I left that school)


I remember you mentioning the odd prob.

Don't know for sure 'cuz
I haven't been at that school since April.


So, you're a "Love 'em and leave 'em" type of guy eh? Get what you can,
then
cast 'em aside like so much flotsam. :-))


Never "loved" that school and thought it was a good thing, but having
been out of there for 5 months and training elsewhere, I can say for
certain the move was a very good choice. (Not to mention the new
school is a 3 mile drive from work or home and the old as 43 miles
each way.


That's always a good thing. You can even see the weather from your bed :-)

- plus the chief pilot has something like 20,000 hours in
helicopters)


He must've used up all his luck by now


--
Beav

Reply to "beavis dot original at ntlworld dot com" (with the obvious
changes)





 




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