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Groen Bros. DARPA Award



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 7th 05, 08:58 PM
John A. Landry
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Default Groen Bros. DARPA Award

GROEN BROTHERS AVIATION SELECTED BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY (DARPA) TO DESIGN NEXT GENERATION ROTORCRAFT
FOR COMBAT SEARCH AND RESCUE

Salt Lake City, Utah - November 7, 2005 - Groen Brothers Aviation, Inc.

(GBA) (OTC: BB GNBA) announced today that the US Defense Advanced Research
Projects Agency (DARPA) has selected a GBA-led team to design a proof of
concept high speed, long range, vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft
designed for use in Combat Search and Rescue roles. Phase one of this
potentially multi-year $40 million four phase program, begins with a fifteen
month $6.4 million award to develop the preliminary design and perform key
technology demonstrations. This modern rotorcraft, named by DARPA as the
"Heliplane" is designed to exploit GBA's gyrodyne technology, offering the
VTOL capability of a helicopter, the fast forward flight of an airplane, and
the safety, simplicity and reliability of a GBA gyroplane. This aircraft type
could be the next generation rotor wing aircraft, meeting economy and
performance goals not considered achievable by any other type of VTOL
aircraft.

DARPA is the central research and development organization for the US
Department of Defense (DoD). It manages and directs select basic and applied
research for DoD, emphasizing technology development projects where payoff is
high and where success may provide dramatic advances in the capabilities of
our combat forces.

"DARPA is a vastly diverse and capable organization charged with developing
the world's most advanced science in military technologies of every kind,"
said David Groen, President and CEO of Groen Brothers Aviation. "The DARPA
team is an amazing collection of scientists, engineers, and management and
administrative cadre, the likes of which have no equal. We are most impressed
with their dedication and are delighted with having been selected." "Our
Team," said Jay Groen, GBA's Chairman of the Board, "includes The Georgia
Institute of Technology, Adam Aircraft Industries, Williams International, and
a highly renowned team of aerospace consultants." Georgia Tech is a top U.S.
graduate engineering research university, with premier aerospace engineering
programs and its world famous rotary wing technology program. Adam Aircraft is
highly respected for its innovative use of modern composite materials,
engineering quality, and rapid prototyping processes that has allowed Adam to
bring to market two new high-performance aircraft: the six passenger
"center-line-twin" A500 and the A700 personal jet. Williams International has
developed more than 40 different small gas turbine engine systems for both
military and commercial air vehicles, including the Adam A700 and many other
modern "biz-jets."

The GBA contract with DARPA is based upon the "gyrodyne" concept long espoused
by Groen Brothers Aviation and extensively researched by Georgia Tech. A
gyrodyne is similar in appearance to a winged helicopter, and like a
helicopter is capable of hovering and vertical takeoff and landing. Unlike a
helicopter, however, a gyrodyne's rotor is driven by rotor blade reaction
drives and are powered only during hover, takeoff and landing. During forward
flight, like a gyroplane, the rotor is not powered, with forward thrust being
provided by engines typical of an airplane. This use of reaction drives for
rotor power and main engines for forward thrust eliminates the need for much
of the cost, weight, and complexity found in helicopters, while permitting
much higher forward speeds.

About Groen Brothers Aviation, Inc.

Developing gyroplane technology since 1986, GBA is recognized as the world's
leading authority on autorotative flight. The company has developed the
Rolls-Royce gas turbine engine powered Hawk 4, the world's first commercially
viable modern gyroplane - the first "autogiro" to utilize a jet engine. The
Hawk 4 Gyroplane was used extensively for security aerial patrol missions
during the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City. The gyroplane's inherently
simple design offers a safe and affordable alternative to helicopters and
airplanes for many applications, including aerial observation roles in both
government and private applications, agricultural aerial application, tour
guide flights, and cargo/passenger transport. Through its American Autogyro
division, the company has also developed and is currently selling a smaller
kit gyroplane, the two seat "SparrowHawk," and developing a production two
seat gyroplane for the Light Sport Aircraft market. These designs also provide
a safe, extremely economical Airborne Patrol Vehicle (APV) for law enforcement
and other government applications. The Company continues to develop a
nationwide dealership network for the sale of these products. Further
information about the Company, its products, and individual members of the GBA
Team is available on the Company's web site at: www.gbagyros.com.

Safe Harbor Statement/Forward Looking Information Disclaimer

Certain statements in this news release by Groen Brothers Aviation are
forward-looking within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of
1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as
amended. Forward looking information is subject to risk and uncertainty.
Certain statements in this Press Release may contain forward looking
information that involves risk and uncertainty, including but not limited to,
the Company's ability to fund ongoing operations and to complete its
obligations under the government contract and its other ongoing commitments.
Future results and trends depend on a variety of factors, including the
Company's successful execution of internal performance plans; product
development and performance; risks associated with regulatory certifications
of the Company's commercial aircraft by U.S. and foreign governments;
government bid uncertainty; other regulatory uncertainties; performance issues
with key suppliers and subcontractors; governmental export and import
policies; and the ability to adequately finance operations including meeting
its debt obligations, fund manufacturing and delivery of products.
Ads
  #2  
Old November 9th 05, 12:19 AM
Flyingmonk
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Default Groen Bros. DARPA Award

I'd pick the R44 over this anyday of the week.

  #3  
Old November 10th 05, 01:40 AM
boB
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Default Groen Bros. DARPA Award

Flyingmonk wrote:

I'd pick the R44 over this anyday of the week.


Just asking. Why?

--

boB,
SAG 70

U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)
  #4  
Old November 10th 05, 11:42 PM
George Vranek
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Default Groen Bros. DARPA Award

Because it is able to hower. The ability to hower is the only reason why
people buy helicopters which are more complex, more expesive and slower than
fixed wing aircrafts.

George

"boB" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
...
Flyingmonk wrote:

I'd pick the R44 over this anyday of the week.


Just asking. Why?

--

boB,
SAG 70

U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)



  #5  
Old November 11th 05, 08:18 PM
John A. Landry
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Default Groen Bros. DARPA Award

On Fri, 11 Nov 2005 00:42:34 +0100, in rec.aviation.rotorcraft, George Vranek
said:

Because it is able to hower. The ability to hower is the only reason why
people buy helicopters which are more complex, more expesive and slower than
fixed wing aircrafts.


George,

You're right in that if there's a need to hover, for all practical purposes a
helicopter would be the aircraft of choice.

On the other hand, I think you're missing the point about the DARPA project as
described in the press release...

They aren't talking about a helicopter application. The press release said:
"...high speed, long range, vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft..."
which doesn't sound like too many helicopters I've heard of.

But the "gyrodyne"... a hybrid aircraft arguably combining some of the best
aspects of a gyroplane, a helicopter, and possibly even a fixed wing
aircraft... could possibly fit the requirements. A gyrodyne has the ability
to takeoff and land vertically (though not likely hover accurately for
extended periods) and cruise at higher speeds using lower power than a
helicopter can.

If you think about it, maybe there are applications better suited to something
like a gyrodyne verses a helicopter or even a STOL fixed wing... like when
there's a need for both high cruising airspeeds and the ability to takeoff or
land from very small unimproved landing areas (ones with no runway).

I'm sure back when the automobile was first explored, some folks said: "I'll
take a horse any day."

Ya gotta keep an open mind. Just a thought!

Respectfully,

John L.
(Former Army helicopter pilot, and currently a gyroplane pilot.)
  #6  
Old November 11th 05, 09:36 PM
boB
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Default Groen Bros. DARPA Award


Ya gotta keep an open mind. Just a thought!

Respectfully,

John L.
(Former Army helicopter pilot, and currently a gyroplane pilot.)


Hey John..... I don't recall the name but I was flying Army from 1970 -
1995. Even if we haven't met I'm sure our paths have crossed somewhere
along the line.

My dream was to build a RAF2000 Gyro, mostly because of the enclosed
cockpit and the standard type seating. I had even contacted an IP in
Pensacola about the training. I learned my lesson about thinking I
needed no new instruction after buying my Sprint II. that little guy
was a handful until I settled down. It flys so slow I felt like I
was hovering over the fields.

The RAF2000 would be as good as some small fixed wings with the only
drawback of lack of storage space with 2 people inside. That dream is
on hold now but what do you fly? I would like to hear your experiences.

http://flightsims.vze.com/raf2000

Take Care,

--

boB,
SAG 70

U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)
  #7  
Old November 11th 05, 09:49 PM
Jim Carriere
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Default Groen Bros. DARPA Award

boB wrote:
My dream was to build a RAF2000 Gyro, mostly because of the enclosed
cockpit and the standard type seating. I had even contacted an IP in
Pensacola about the training. I learned my lesson about thinking I


Bob (bOB? , in the Pensacola neck of the woods there are about half a
dozen gyroplanes at the Brewton muni airport (about 50 miles north of PNS).

I come by this knowledge from passing within a few miles of Brewton last
year and talking with a gyroplane there on unicom. Since the gyro
community is a fairly small and tight, you may have already heard about
them.
  #8  
Old November 11th 05, 10:06 PM
boB
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Default Gyro's was Groen Bros. DARPA Award

Jim Carriere wrote:

boB wrote:

My dream was to build a RAF2000 Gyro, mostly because of the enclosed
cockpit and the standard type seating. I had even contacted an IP in
Pensacola about the training. I learned my lesson about thinking I



Bob (bOB? , in the Pensacola neck of the woods there are about half a
dozen gyroplanes at the Brewton muni airport (about 50 miles north of PNS).

I come by this knowledge from passing within a few miles of Brewton last
year and talking with a gyroplane there on unicom. Since the gyro
community is a fairly small and tight, you may have already heard about
them.


boB... there are so many Bob's that I spell my name backwards. I
didn't know about Brewton. The IP I called was something like "dolph"
something. I wold have to go back through my folder on the gyro. I hope
some day to be flying again. Right now the pain medication I take is so
strong I don't even drive a car any more. My wife, bless her heart, did
not let me get in my ultralight even though I protested that flying it
was so easy I couldn't possibly get hurt. I sold it. But I can always
keep hoping.

My Toy
http://img247.imageshack.us/img247/3...rastrip8lz.jpg
--

boB,
SAG 70

U.S. Army Aviation (retired)
Central Texas - 5NM West of Gray Army Airfield (KGRK)
  #9  
Old November 11th 05, 11:51 PM
B4RT
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Default Groen Bros. DARPA Award


"George Vranek" wrote in message
...
Because it is able to hower. The ability to hower is the only reason why
people buy helicopters which are more complex, more expesive and slower
than
fixed wing aircrafts.

George



The quote above means you have no understanding of why a helicopter is
useful.
I own two planes and a helicopter. The airplanes only take me to airports.
The
Jet Ranger can take me where I'm actually going.

I rarely have any need to hover.

Bart


  #10  
Old November 11th 05, 11:51 PM
B4RT
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Default Groen Bros. DARPA Award


"George Vranek" wrote in message
...
Because it is able to hower. The ability to hower is the only reason why
people buy helicopters which are more complex, more expesive and slower
than
fixed wing aircrafts.

George



The quote above means you have no understanding of why a helicopter is
useful.
I own two planes and a helicopter. The airplanes only take me to airports.
The
Jet Ranger can take me where I'm actually going.

I rarely have any need to hover.

Bart


 




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