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Visual approach clearance



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 15th 03, 07:33 PM
ZikZak
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Default Visual approach clearance

On 10/10/03 11:38 AM, in article
, "Robert M. Gary"
wrote:

"BTIZ" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

2) you "can fly VFR" above FL-180, and be in VMC (Visual Meteorological
Conditions) at the time... you have an "IFR clearance" to do so.. gliders
are cleared above FL-180 all the time.. "remain clear of clouds"..


I'm not sure what you mean by "fly VFR above FL-180". Yes, you can be
VMC and yes you can be navigating visually, yes you can be maintaining
visual separation from called traffic, but you are still operating
under IFR.


There are a (very) few places in the U.S. where class A does not extend down
to FL180.

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  #2  
Old October 15th 03, 07:50 PM
David Megginson
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ZikZak writes:

There are a (very) few places in the U.S. where class A does not extend down
to FL180.


.... and more elsewhere in North America. Class A starts at FL230 in
the Canadian Northern Control Area (roughly north of 60 deg latitude,
but with a lot of variation) and at FL270 in the Canadian Arctic
Control Area (roughly north of 75 deg latitude). I think it's
probably a matter of the limits of radar coverage.


All the best,


David

  #3  
Old October 15th 03, 08:18 PM
Ron Natalie
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"ZikZak" wrote in message ...

There are a (very) few places in the U.S. where class A does not extend down
to FL180.


Hawaii, Parts of the Florida Keys (south of 25:04), Santa Barbara Island and Farallon Island (California),
and parts of Alaska.


  #4  
Old October 15th 03, 09:30 PM
John Harper
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How do you know this? I don't mean that as a challenge, just, how is it
charted/depicted/whatever? I didn't know that and, yes, I'm annoyed at
failing a trivia test...

John

"Ron Natalie" wrote in message
. ..

"ZikZak" wrote in message

...

There are a (very) few places in the U.S. where class A does not extend

down
to FL180.


Hawaii, Parts of the Florida Keys (south of 25:04), Santa Barbara Island

and Farallon Island (California),
and parts of Alaska.




  #5  
Old October 15th 03, 11:59 PM
Debe
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Operating under a clearance, yes.
But how does the lack of an Instrument rating enter the picture? Do the
IFR rules say you have to have an instrument rating? Obviously there
are exceptions, because it is fairly common to get a legal clearance
above 18K even though the glider has no gyros and the pilot has no
instrument rating. Wave windows are the most common usage, but
I believe there have been examples of pop up clearances.




In article , ZikZak wrote:
On 10/10/03 11:38 AM, in article
, "Robert M. Gary"
wrote:

"BTIZ" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

2) you "can fly VFR" above FL-180, and be in VMC (Visual Meteorological
Conditions) at the time... you have an "IFR clearance" to do so.. gliders
are cleared above FL-180 all the time.. "remain clear of clouds"..


I'm not sure what you mean by "fly VFR above FL-180". Yes, you can be
VMC and yes you can be navigating visually, yes you can be maintaining
visual separation from called traffic, but you are still operating
under IFR.


There are a (very) few places in the U.S. where class A does not extend down
to FL180.

  #6  
Old October 16th 03, 01:10 AM
Ron Natalie
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"John Harper" wrote in message news:[email protected]
How do you know this? I don't mean that as a challenge, just, how is it
charted/depicted/whatever? I didn't know that and, yes, I'm annoyed at
failing a trivia test...

It's in the FAR's 71.33


  #7  
Old October 16th 03, 09:48 PM
CASK829
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We have gotten WAY off topic here. Lets get back to the origonal question.
Can a visual approach clearance be given at or above FL180. The controllers
supervisors say no, but cannot back up their assertion.
  #8  
Old October 16th 03, 11:15 PM
Peter Duniho
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"CASK829" wrote in message
...
We have gotten WAY off topic here. Lets get back to the origonal

question.
Can a visual approach clearance be given at or above FL180. The

controllers
supervisors say no


The original question was answered. The answer is "yes", and the
supervisors to whom you refer are mistaken.


  #9  
Old October 17th 03, 03:54 AM
Steven P. McNicoll
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"CASK829" wrote in message
...

We have gotten WAY off topic here. Lets get back to the origonal

question.
Can a visual approach clearance be given at or above FL180.


Yes it can.



The controllers supervisors say no, but cannot back up their assertion.


Of course they can't. There's no altitude restriction on the issuance of a
visual approach clearance.


 




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