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Competition I.D.



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 15th 03, 01:06 AM
Ray Lovinggood
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Default Competition I.D.

Does anyone know the story of Competition Identification
numbers and/or letters?

Who decided they were necessary?
When?
Why?

etc...

(It's cold, gray, wet, and winter and I was just wondering
about the history of competition I.D.'s.)

Ray Lovinggood
Carrboro, North Carolina, USA
LS-1d, 'W8' as in 'WAIT' for me!!!



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  #2  
Old December 15th 03, 02:47 PM
Andy Durbin
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Default

Ray Lovinggood wrote in message ...
Does anyone know the story of Competition Identification
numbers and/or letters?

Who decided they were necessary?
When?
Why?



I imagine they were required when turn point verification was done by
ground observers. Before my time though. I started with the high tech
cartridge cameras but now I can't even remember what the film type
was.


Andy (GY)
  #3  
Old December 15th 03, 03:50 PM
John H. Campbell
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They started as numbers, possibly assigned as rankings as of some date as
the more prominent pilots of the 1950s had the low numbers, or maybe they
were just first in line, I forget. Dick Schreder was "1", A.J. Smith "2"...
Then 2 alpha characters, George Moffat "XX"..., 2 alpha-numeric, John
Seaborn "A8"..., 3 characters came in about a dozen years ago as the 2
character supply ran out, Tom Knauff "JOY"...


  #4  
Old December 15th 03, 10:39 PM
Sam Fly
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Default



Andy Durbin wrote:
Ray Lovinggood wrote in message ...

Does anyone know the story of Competition Identification
numbers and/or letters?

Who decided they were necessary?
When?
Why?




I imagine they were required when turn point verification was done by
ground observers. Before my time though. I started with the high tech
cartridge cameras but now I can't even remember what the film type
was.


Andy (GY)


Andy, it was 1-26 camera and film...I still have two 1-26 instamatic
camera in a mount and 10 rolls of film in the freezer...Any one
interested in a deal ?

Sam Fly (7F)

  #5  
Old December 15th 03, 11:11 PM
Doug Hoffman
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Default

So much for history. Isn't the real question now: "Why do we still use
them?"?

-Doug

From: (Andy Durbin)
Organization:
http://groups.google.com
Newsgroups: rec.aviation.soaring
Date: 15 Dec 2003 05:47:30 -0800
Subject: Competition I.D.

Ray Lovinggood wrote in message
...
Does anyone know the story of Competition Identification
numbers and/or letters?

Who decided they were necessary?
When?
Why?



I imagine they were required when turn point verification was done by
ground observers. Before my time though. I started with the high tech
cartridge cameras but now I can't even remember what the film type
was.


Andy (GY)


  #6  
Old December 15th 03, 11:27 PM
John Shelton
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Default

That's easy. And I think that George Moffatt made reference to that in his
book when he commented that Hugh Bickel was particularly thoughtful for
painting the nose of his glider red.

When I am out there on course having not seen any of the nearby gliders for
an eternity and catch a glimpse of someone rolling into a climb, there is
nothing more encouraging than to look up and see R1 painted under the wing
instead of the number of a fellow doofus.

(In the case of R1, it would mean that I am way out in front, lost and in
deep kimchi, or under one of Roy Cundiff's old gliders)

"Doug Hoffman" wrote in message
...
So much for history. Isn't the real question now: "Why do we still use
them?"?

-Doug

From: (Andy Durbin)
Organization:
http://groups.google.com
Newsgroups: rec.aviation.soaring
Date: 15 Dec 2003 05:47:30 -0800
Subject: Competition I.D.

Ray Lovinggood wrote in message
...
Does anyone know the story of Competition Identification
numbers and/or letters?

Who decided they were necessary?
When?
Why?



I imagine they were required when turn point verification was done by
ground observers. Before my time though. I started with the high tech
cartridge cameras but now I can't even remember what the film type
was.


Andy (GY)




  #7  
Old December 15th 03, 11:28 PM
Marc Ramsey
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Default


"Doug Hoffman" wrote...
So much for history. Isn't the real question now: "Why do we still use
them?"?


Uh, would you prefer "Glider with red trim at latitude 39 degrees 17.05
minutes, 119 degrees 23.22 minutes, 11,500 feet, WATCH OUT I'M RIGHT BELOW
YOU!!!!"

Marc


  #8  
Old December 16th 03, 02:12 AM
Sam Fly
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Default

Doug,

I think it is a safety item to be able to identify a glider near you and
you wish to communicate with him/her. You sure cannot read the N number
as they are too small.

Sam Fly

Doug Hoffman wrote:
So much for history. Isn't the real question now: "Why do we still use
them?"?

-Doug


From: (Andy Durbin)
Organization:
http://groups.google.com
Newsgroups: rec.aviation.soaring
Date: 15 Dec 2003 05:47:30 -0800
Subject: Competition I.D.

Ray Lovinggood wrote in message
...

Does anyone know the story of Competition Identification
numbers and/or letters?

Who decided they were necessary?
When?
Why?



I imagine they were required when turn point verification was done by
ground observers. Before my time though. I started with the high tech
cartridge cameras but now I can't even remember what the film type
was.


Andy (GY)




  #9  
Old December 16th 03, 07:00 AM
Fantsu
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Doug Hoffman" wrote in message
...
So much for history. Isn't the real question now: "Why do we still use
them?"?


Faster to say and easier to remember, bigger to see, more reasons needed?
Plus set the pilot in the competition feeling

h


  #10  
Old December 16th 03, 08:27 AM
CH
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Default

how do you know the right frequency mate?
In comps you see the sign on the tail normally first.
In gaggles I try to be in a position, where I do not
see the comp sign under the wings close.
CH


"Marc Ramsey" wrote in message
...

"Doug Hoffman" wrote...
So much for history. Isn't the real question now: "Why do we still use
them?"?


Uh, would you prefer "Glider with red trim at latitude 39 degrees 17.05
minutes, 119 degrees 23.22 minutes, 11,500 feet, WATCH OUT I'M RIGHT BELOW
YOU!!!!"

Marc




 




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