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Question on airplane's IFR capability



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 11th 03, 01:31 PM
Slav Inger
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Default Question on airplane's IFR capability

I'm planning on transitioning from a PA-28-181 to Diamond models (DA20C1
and then to DA40). I'd like to use the DA40 for longer trips and DA20
for putzing around the airport practicing IFR approaches, possibly in
IMC. There isn't a question as to DA40's IFR capability, but I'm
running into a bit of an issue with the DA20. The smaller DA20's
equipment is top of the line and meets the minimum IFR equipment list
per FAR 91.205. Here's the rub: I'm being told that it isn't IFR
capable because it doesn't have the static wicks on the trailing edges
of the wings. I have never ever heard of wicks being a requirement for
IFR flight. So what's the deal here, does the claim "airplane isn't IFR
legal even though it meets the minimum IFR equipment list" have any
validity? Curious,

- Slav Inger
- PP ASEL IA @ YIP
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  #2  
Old July 11th 03, 02:26 PM
Ben Jackson
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Default

In article ,
Slav Inger wrote:
Here's the rub: I'm being told that it isn't IFR
capable because it doesn't have the static wicks on the trailing edges
of the wings.


All electronic instruments in a plastic (ie nonconductive) airframe.
Doesn't sound like a good recipe to me!

Can you get a DA20 IFR certified at all? I didn't even think it was
an option.

--
Ben Jackson

http://www.ben.com/
  #3  
Old July 11th 03, 03:11 PM
Robert Moore
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Default

Slav Inger wrote
So what's the deal here, does the claim "airplane
isn't IFR legal even though it meets the minimum
IFR equipment list" have any validity? Curious,


The Airplane Flight Manual will list the approved
operations, Day, Night, IFR, etc.

Bob Moore
  #4  
Old July 11th 03, 03:19 PM
David Megginson
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Default

Slav Inger writes:

I'm planning on transitioning from a PA-28-181 to Diamond models (DA20C1
and then to DA40). I'd like to use the DA40 for longer trips and DA20
for putzing around the airport practicing IFR approaches, possibly in
IMC. There isn't a question as to DA40's IFR capability, but I'm
running into a bit of an issue with the DA20. The smaller DA20's
equipment is top of the line and meets the minimum IFR equipment list
per FAR 91.205. Here's the rub: I'm being told that it isn't IFR
capable because it doesn't have the static wicks on the trailing edges
of the wings. I have never ever heard of wicks being a requirement for
IFR flight. So what's the deal here, does the claim "airplane isn't IFR
legal even though it meets the minimum IFR equipment list" have any
validity? Curious,


Composite aircraft need some kind of a metal mesh built into the
airframe so that they can handle a lightning strike without completely
delaminating. The Katana will never usable for IFR because it has no
such mesh. The Star, I think, has that mesh, as do other IFR
composites like the SR20/22.


All the best,


David

--
David Megginson, , http://www.megginson.com/
  #5  
Old July 11th 03, 04:23 PM
Ron Natalie
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Default


"Robert Moore" wrote in message . 8...
Slav Inger wrote
So what's the deal here, does the claim "airplane
isn't IFR legal even though it meets the minimum
IFR equipment list" have any validity? Curious,


The Airplane Flight Manual will list the approved
operations, Day, Night, IFR, etc.

For later model planes it will. Older aircraft weren't required to
be certificated specifically for these operations (nor have AFM's).
In that case, as long as you meet the equipment and inspection
requirements, you're legal (same for homebuilts).


  #6  
Old July 11th 03, 05:14 PM
John T
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"Slav Inger" wrote in message

I'm planning on transitioning from a PA-28-181 to Diamond models
(DA20C1 and then to DA40). I'd like to use the DA40 for longer trips
and DA20 for putzing around the airport practicing IFR approaches,
possibly in IMC.


It's my understanding that the -20 is VFR only. You could always use it to
practice approaches in VMC...

--
John T
http://tknowlogy.com/tknoFlyer
__________



  #7  
Old July 11th 03, 05:46 PM
Slav Inger
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Default

John T wrote:

It's my understanding that the -20 is VFR only. You could always use it to
practice approaches in VMC...


That's true, but I prefer to practice in more or less realistic
conditions, like low VFR or "high" IFR. I was hoping I'd be able to do
this in the DA20 which is much less money than the DA40...

- Slav Inger
- PP ASEL IA @ YIP
  #8  
Old July 11th 03, 08:32 PM
John T
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Default

"Slav Inger" wrote in message


That's true, but I prefer to practice in more or less realistic
conditions, like low VFR or "high" IFR. I was hoping I'd be able to
do
this in the DA20 which is much less money than the DA40...


I know the feeling - even though I look for solid IMC.

However, when I'm expecting IMC, I'd much rather spend the extra money for a
late model plane with the right equipment than skimp for a less-than-ideal
plane (say, a '99 C172S vs an '86 C172P). In your situation, I wouldn't
even consider taking the -20 into IMC.

Besides, that plane can be real...fun in turbulence.

--
John T
http://tknowlogy.com/tknoFlyer
__________



  #9  
Old July 11th 03, 09:35 PM
Slav Inger
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Default

John T wrote:

However, when I'm expecting IMC, I'd much rather spend the extra money for a
late model plane with the right equipment than skimp for a less-than-ideal
plane (say, a '99 C172S vs an '86 C172P). In your situation, I wouldn't
even consider taking the -20 into IMC.


I'm definitely not interested in breaking any regs or jeopardizing
safety, so if it won't do IFR, it won't do IFR - I'll have to look for
other ways to do what I want to do.

- Slav Inger
- PP ASEL IA @ YIP
  #10  
Old July 12th 03, 12:50 AM
Paul Baechler
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Default

In article ,
"Ron Natalie" wrote:

"Robert Moore" wrote in message
.8...
The Airplane Flight Manual will list the approved
operations, Day, Night, IFR, etc.

For later model planes it will. Older aircraft weren't required to
be certificated specifically for these operations (nor have AFM's).
In that case, as long as you meet the equipment and inspection
requirements, you're legal (same for homebuilts).


Not necessarily. There are older aircraft that are prohibited from IFR
operations. Two that come to mind are the Culver Cadet and the Bell 47.

--
Paul Baechler


 




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