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Wiggly amps



 
 
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  #11  
Old April 30th 04, 11:48 PM
Don Johnstone
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If you don't put a stop condition in your recursive
loops your stack will collide with your heap and you
will crash :-)

At 22:24 30 April 2004, Bob Kuykendall wrote:
Earlier, 'Phil Jeffery' wrote:

Why ask such a stupid question when you know very
well?


In order to understand recursion, first you must understand
recursion.



Bob K.




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  #12  
Old May 1st 04, 01:18 AM
Nyal Williams
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At 23:00 30 April 2004, Don Johnstone wrote:
If you don't put a stop condition in your recursive
loops your stack will collide with your heap and you
will crash :-)



It would seem that as glider pilots we aspire to the
condition of being NASA engineers who view the world
via cathode ray tubes. (Please note that I did not
use a non-restrictive comma.)



  #13  
Old May 2nd 04, 07:39 AM
Robin Birch
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In message , Nyal Williams
writes
At 23:00 30 April 2004, Don Johnstone wrote:
If you don't put a stop condition in your recursive
loops your stack will collide with your heap and you
will crash :-)



It would seem that as glider pilots we aspire to the
condition of being NASA engineers who view the world
via cathode ray tubes. (Please note that I did not
use a non-restrictive comma.)



Me personally, I aspire to just being able to stay up :-)
--
Robin Birch
  #14  
Old May 4th 04, 09:23 PM
Robert Ehrlich
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Don Johnstone wrote:

If you don't put a stop condition in your recursive
loops your stack will collide with your heap and you
will crash :-)


Except if tail recursion is detected and stacking avoided
in this case, then you have an endless loop i.e. you circle
forever :-)
  #15  
Old May 5th 04, 03:16 AM
Tom Seim
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My question: Where is the power coming from to run
all these devices?


We can look forward to alternatives to the battery we love to hate
(sealed lead-acid):

PLYMOUTH MEETING, Pa., July 8 -- Lithium Technology
Corporation, ("LTC," "the Company") (OTC Bulletin Board: LITH.OB), an
early
production stage rechargeable lithium battery manufacturer, today
announced
that its GAIA operating units have received firm purchase orders for
high
performance lithium-ion prototype batteries for transportation
applications
from two different customers.
LTC's GAIA U.S.A. unit at Plymouth Meeting, PA, has received a
purchase
order from Penn State University for a 180-Volt prototype Hybrid
Electric
Vehicle (HEV) battery for an advanced truck application that the
University
intends to enter into the Future Truck Competition in June 2004. The
US DOE
sponsors the Future Truck program and the annual competition to
promote the
development of fuel-efficient vehicle technology. This prototype
battery will
be comprised of 50 of the Company's proprietary 27 Ah flat cells,
along with a
Battery Management System (BMS), and will provide about 70kW of power,
which
is a substantial improvement over the heavier lead acid battery system
that it
will replace. Delivery is scheduled for September 2003.
LTC's GAIA Europe unit at Nordhausen, Germany, has received orders for
several advanced automotive batteries from a world-renowned car
manufacturer.
One of these prototypes is a unique 12-Volt auxiliary power source to
be
housed in a thin panel. LTC's proprietary large-format flat cell
technology
and stainless steel flat pack configuration readily met the customer's
OEM
specifications with a battery having a 20 Ah capacity in a case
measuring
12.5 inches (315mm) by 7.9 inches (200mm) by 1.2 inches (30mm). The
other
prototypes are nominal 12-Volt SLI (starting-lighting-ignition)
batteries
using the Company's proprietary 27 Ah cylindrical cells measuring 5.1
inches
(130mm) by 2.4 inches (60mm) in diameter. These batteries will provide
up to
9kW of starting power. Initial delivery is scheduled for August 2003.
In
addition, LTC will supply a Battery Management System (BMS) for each
of the
prototypes. The batteries will undergo extensive testing by the OEM.
Previously, in September 2002, GAIA Europe delivered a prototype
42-Volt
automotive battery to BMW as part of the Astor program, a consortium
of seven
European automakers evaluating new power sources. That battery remains
on
test in Europe.
Dr. Franz Kruger, President and Chief Operating Officer of LTC, said,
"These orders represent another important milestone in our ongoing
initiatives
to have transportation industry OEMs test and qualify our advanced
large
format batteries which can deliver high-rate, high-capacity, low
temperature
operations and long cycle life. The Penn State opportunity represents
the
first in-vehicle demonstration of LTC's automotive battery prototypes
and we
are pleased to be the University's first choice for a lithium-ion
solution."
LTC, with operating locations in Plymouth Meeting, PA, and Nordhausen
Germany, is sampling customers in the U.S. and Europe with its unique
large
format prototype batteries for a variety of national security,
stationary
power and transportation applications. The Company's battery products
carry
the GAIA brand name and trademark.
  #16  
Old May 5th 04, 03:03 PM
Robert Ehrlich
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Tom Seim wrote:
...
We can look forward to alternatives to the battery we love to hate
(sealed lead-acid):
...


I don't hate sealed lead-acid batteries. They are inexpensive, don't
need a special charger, their capacity is sufficient for the use we
have. A local plus is that there is a little factory nearby making
them and we can bring the old ones to them for direct recycling.
  #17  
Old May 6th 04, 05:56 AM
Tom Seim
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Robert Ehrlich wrote in message ...
Tom Seim wrote:
...
We can look forward to alternatives to the battery we love to hate
(sealed lead-acid):
...


I don't hate sealed lead-acid batteries. They are inexpensive, don't
need a special charger, their capacity is sufficient for the use we
have. A local plus is that there is a little factory nearby making
them and we can bring the old ones to them for direct recycling.



Clearly you haven't installed a transponder (yet).

Tom
  #18  
Old May 6th 04, 01:25 PM
Robert Ehrlich
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Tom Seim wrote:
..

I don't hate sealed lead-acid batteries. They are inexpensive, don't
need a special charger, their capacity is sufficient for the use we
have. A local plus is that there is a little factory nearby making
them and we can bring the old ones to them for direct recycling.


Clearly you haven't installed a transponder (yet).


No, I didn't, no am I going to, since I am only flying club
gliders and so it is not under my responsability to do that,
But it is highly probable that in a near future we must do
that for most club gliders in France, and in this case I think
a second battery will be installed just for the transponder.
 




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