A aviation & planes forum. AviationBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » AviationBanter forum » rec.aviation newsgroups » Soaring
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Anti-collision strobe lights



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old September 19th 18, 04:08 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Gerry Simpson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Anti-collision strobe lights

Does anyone have knowledge of documented studies showing the efficacy of the strobe light bars which are available to be installed in the leading edges of the vertical stabilizers on gliders? Is there anything beyond anecdotal experience to support their use to improve visibility to other aircraft beyond a minuscule amount? Has anyone had experience that they are willing to share? To what extent does an installation disrupt the laminar airflow around the vertical stabilizer?
Ads
  #2  
Old September 19th 18, 07:05 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
RR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 39
Default Anti-collision strobe lights

I have them on my purchased used ash-31. The only place they are visible at all is under a dark cloud street directly head on. That is not a bad place to have the extra vis, but I dont think I would order them if I was buying new.

Above my pay grade to notice any performance hit.

RR
  #3  
Old September 19th 18, 07:11 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
bumper[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 410
Default Anti-collision strobe lights

On Tuesday, September 18, 2018 at 8:08:49 PM UTC-7, Gerry Simpson wrote:
Does anyone have knowledge of documented studies showing the efficacy of the strobe light bars which are available to be installed in the leading edges of the vertical stabilizers on gliders? Is there anything beyond anecdotal experience to support their use to improve visibility to other aircraft beyond a minuscule amount? Has anyone had experience that they are willing to share? To what extent does an installation disrupt the laminar airflow around the vertical stabilizer?


While not answering your question, I did do a test on my LED landing/taxi wig-wag install on my Husky. These are super bright lights and the alternating flashing is attention getting as well. At 36 watts each and four lamps - absolutely no comparison to what Schleicher installs in the leading edge. here's the test results:

Jim J. flew over to Minden, NV this morning, and I launched to meet him head-on (well, almost so) near South Lake Tahoe (KTVL) at 9,800'. It was close to 10 AM, with the sun low off my left wing in the high overcast, winter sky. The object was to see how or if pulsed AeroLEDs would enhance the "see" part of see and avoid, and in particular, if threat aircraft acquisition distance would be increased.

Before discussing our non-scientific findings, a couple of notes. My aging vision is corrected to 20-13, been better than average all my life. I usually have "joy" on other small aircraft at a minimum of 3 miles when I don't have my head where it doesn’t belong. I've read that flashing lights are advantageous as they are more easily picked up in one's peripheral vision. LED's, with their almost instant rise and fall time, or on and off, give an effect akin to a strobe light. So in flash mode are more attention getting than incandescent lamps. A wig-wag, back and forth flash sequence is said to impart a sense of motion sort of visual response to help us pick up a target faster.

Distance results were somewhat disappointing, at least for our several test runs. We'd pass each other head on, fly for about a minute, then turn and re-acquire from a starting distance of 4 miles or so. In each case, we both agreed that when we would be able to pick up the other's aircraft, the lights were visible at or nearly at the same time as the aircraft itself. I don't think that, at least in daylight and at 3 miles or so distance, the lights are particularly effective at extending the acquisition distance beyond what one would detect without the lights on. I'm thinking that this is probably due to the small relative size of the target at that range - - the lights are tiny pin pricks of light winking on each wing tip. BUT, I'm very sure a regular incandescent or halogen lamp, under the same conditions, would not be discernable at all until the aircraft got much closer.

Now, closer in is another story. If one missed picking up on an incoming aircraft until it was closer, say at a mile or so, and in most of the frontal arc, then I do think the AeroLEDs may provide a significant safety enhancement to collision avoidance. I have no good way to confirm or test this, save from briefly looking away and then allowing my peripheral vision to pick up Jim's aircraft's movement when he was closer, the lights seem to what attract the old eyeballs first.

I've heard, and my own experience confirms, that lights help avoid bird strikes. Flying from the N. Bay area down to Half Moon Bay, CA, flying the coast, one is almost forced to fly low under S.F.'s Class B airspace. I've watched a number of birds do the "Oh s%&t I'm gonna die!" diving, collision avoidance maneuver in response to the flashing lights on my Mooney. Never did nail one.

bumper


  #4  
Old September 19th 18, 01:26 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Roy B.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 144
Default Anti-collision strobe lights

I've flown in the same sky with several gliders that have them and as RR says, they are only good for frontal spotting against a dark background. They are a good idea but just not bright enough.
ROY
  #5  
Old September 19th 18, 02:26 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Jonathan St. Cloud
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,031
Default Anti-collision strobe lights

On Tuesday, September 18, 2018 at 8:08:49 PM UTC-7, Gerry Simpson wrote:
Does anyone have knowledge of documented studies showing the efficacy of the strobe light bars which are available to be installed in the leading edges of the vertical stabilizers on gliders? Is there anything beyond anecdotal experience to support their use to improve visibility to other aircraft beyond a minuscule amount? Has anyone had experience that they are willing to share? To what extent does an installation disrupt the laminar airflow around the vertical stabilizer?


One of the gliders I fly has the strobe light in the leading edge of fin or as Schleicher called it, "flashlight in nose of fin". This glider also has the LXNav controller so the strobe can be set to continuous, off, or only flash when there is a Flarm alert. I think the installation weight for strobe and control was about 2 kg. I have been told the strobe really stands out under cloud streets,think Whites, Inyos, the streeting in Nephi, which is where I had several tell me the strobe really added to visibility. On the ground the light is very bright. Would I purchase one, sure, but then my parachutes are less than 20 years old. Is it a must have safety device, probably not. Safety is cumulative and an attitude. Is this flash enough to keep me from hitting another glider with closing rates approaching 300 knot while running a street in the Owens Valley, the strobe gives me added visibility.
  #6  
Old September 19th 18, 05:29 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Tony[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,817
Default Anti-collision strobe lights

When I flew the Electro at Uvalde I ran the vertical fin strobe during the pre-start gaggle and received several positive comments about it.
  #7  
Old September 19th 18, 05:35 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Dave Walsh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 81
Default Anti-collision strobe lights

At 13:26 19 September 2018, Jonathan St. Cloud wrote:
On Tuesday, September 18, 2018 at 8:08:49 PM UTC-7,

Gerry Simpson wrote:
Does anyone have knowledge of documented studies

showing the efficacy of
=
the strobe light bars which are available to be installed in

the leading
ed=
ges of the vertical stabilizers on gliders? Is there anything

beyond
anecdo=
tal experience to support their use to improve visibility to

other
aircraft=
beyond a minuscule amount? Has anyone had experience

that they are
willing=
to share? To what extent does an installation disrupt the

laminar airflow
=
around the vertical stabilizer?

One of the gliders I fly has the strobe light in the leading

edge of fin
or=
as Schleicher called it, "flashlight in nose of fin". This

glider also
ha=
s the LXNav controller so the strobe can be set to

continuous, off, or
only=
flash when there is a Flarm alert. I think the installation

weight for
st=
robe and control was about 2 kg. I have been told the

strobe really
stands=
out under cloud streets,think Whites, Inyos, the streeting

in Nephi,
which=
is where I had several tell me the strobe really added to

visibility. On
=
the ground the light is very bright. Would I purchase one,

sure, but then
=
my parachutes are less than 20 years old. Is it a must have

safety device,
=
probably not. Safety is cumulative and an attitude. Is this

flash enough
=
to keep me from hitting another glider with closing rates

approaching 300
k=
not while running a street in the Owens Valley, the strobe

gives me added
v=
isibility.=20


Quite a few Sisteron gliders have these strobes (or ones
fitted in the nose) I would say they do work at close range,
especially in darker conditions. I wouldn't worry that they
are ineffective at a mile or so - you can't collide with a glider
a mile away. Of course Flarm is mandatory here in the Alps
but even so many newer gliders do have them; the cost is a
tiny fraction of a new ship cost. Having them retro fitted in
the tail seems prohibitively expensive; the ones that form a
ring around the nose hook/pitot are a feasible retro fit
option.


  #8  
Old September 20th 18, 02:36 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
kirk.stant
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,231
Default Anti-collision strobe lights

On Tuesday, September 18, 2018 at 10:08:49 PM UTC-5, Gerry Simpson wrote:
Does anyone have knowledge of documented studies showing the efficacy of the strobe light bars which are available to be installed in the leading edges of the vertical stabilizers on gliders? Is there anything beyond anecdotal experience to support their use to improve visibility to other aircraft beyond a minuscule amount? Has anyone had experience that they are willing to share? To what extent does an installation disrupt the laminar airflow around the vertical stabilizer?


Well, used a certain way they may help prevent leeching:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yehudi_lights

Kirk
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Strobe Lights Lou Home Built 9 October 26th 05 01:58 AM
Anyone use GS-AIR strobe/LED nav lights? [email protected] Home Built 2 August 28th 04 02:54 PM
Anti collision lights mods for Arrow 1968?? Frode Berg Piloting 3 May 20th 04 05:42 AM
Anti-collision lights Grandpa B. Owning 4 August 8th 03 06:27 AM
Anti-collision lights required? Grandpa B. Owning 3 July 31st 03 02:14 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2018 AviationBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.