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ELT Checks



 
 
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  #21  
Old November 19th 03, 08:59 PM
gross_arrow
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"Kevin Chandler" wrote in message ...
One additional thing I thought of is.....

Why do ground schools teach all of the rules of when you can test the ELT
( first 5 minutes of each hour ) if you are not authorized to test it?

Anyone else find this curious?
Kevin



'cuz that's what the aim says: 6-2-5:

b. Testing.

1. ELT's should be tested in accordance with the
manufacturer's instructions, preferably in a shielded or
screened room or specially designed test container to
prevent the broadcast of signals which could trigger a false
alert.

2. When this cannot be done, aircraft operational testing is
authorized as follows:

(a) Analog 121.5/243 MHz ELT's should only
be tested during the first 5 minutes after any
hour. If operational tests must be made outside
of this period, they should be coordinated with
the nearest FAA Control Tower or FSS. Tests
should be no longer than three audible sweeps.
If the antenna is removable, a dummy load
should be substituted during test procedures.

(b) Digital 406 MHz ELT's should only be tested
in accordance with the unit's manufacturer's
instructions.

(c) Airborne tests are not authorized.



you can do this test, but this doesn't satisfy the requirement of
91.207(d), which includes a test of the "crash sensor". the ai
must do this test (i think he drops it on the floor or something).
anyway, that's my take, fwiw.

g_a
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  #22  
Old November 19th 03, 09:18 PM
Paul Mennen
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"Ron Natalie" wrote

You're making requirements that don't exist in the regulations.
As for changing internal batteries in things not designed to be
easily accessible, that is covered by the initial phrase in 43xA.c
"Preventive maintenance is limited to the following
work provided it does not involve complex assembly operations."


Those distinctions always make me chuckle. One man's
complex is another man's simple. (Kind of like the
distinction they make between major and minor alterations).

For instance I changed the internal battery in my NorthStar M2
GPS. Given my skills I did not find this particularly complex,
although many would. (The battery was soldered into a board
that couldn't be removed without also removing dozens of screws,
cables, connectors, etc).

Yet I still usually err on the side of caution. For example
I would be perfectly legal changing my brake pads, but in my
airplane I find this complex (given my skills - or lack thereof
So I feel more comfortable relegating this task to my mechanic.

~Paul


  #23  
Old November 19th 03, 09:21 PM
Ross Richardson
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gross_arrow wrote:
snip


You do not have to drop it. I good swing of the unit in the correct
direction will set it off.

you can do this test, but this doesn't satisfy the requirement of
91.207(d), which includes a test of the "crash sensor". the ai
must do this test (i think he drops it on the floor or something).
anyway, that's my take, fwiw.

g_a

  #24  
Old November 19th 03, 10:37 PM
G.R. Patterson III
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gross_arrow wrote:

you can do this test, but this doesn't satisfy the requirement of
91.207(d), which includes a test of the "crash sensor". the ai
must do this test (i think he drops it on the floor or something).


Not mine. You move it rapidly in the direction in which it faces when in the
airplane and stop it against some object. I just smack the thing against my
other hand.

George Patterson
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something that can
be learned no other way.
  #25  
Old November 20th 03, 03:43 PM
gross_arrow
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"G.R. Patterson III" wrote in message ...
gross_arrow wrote:

you can do this test, but this doesn't satisfy the requirement of
91.207(d), which includes a test of the "crash sensor". the ai
must do this test (i think he drops it on the floor or something).


Not mine. You move it rapidly in the direction in which it faces when in the
airplane and stop it against some object. I just smack the thing against my
other hand.

George Patterson
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something that can
be learned no other way.



i _knew_ i should have put the smiley in......

g_a
  #26  
Old November 20th 03, 04:27 PM
James M. Knox
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Russell Kent wrote in :

Is the ELT ground tied to the plane's ground? :-)


It is in my Piper Arrow. It uses the airplane's ground both for the
antenna groundplane, and also as a return path for the remote switch.

In fact, if you unhook the fuselage antenna from the ELT then the remote
switch no longer works. [Questionable design, but that's the way it came
from Piper.]

-----------------------------------------------
James M. Knox
TriSoft ph 512-385-0316
1109-A Shady Lane fax 512-366-4331
Austin, Tx 78721
-----------------------------------------------
  #27  
Old November 20th 03, 04:36 PM
James M. Knox
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"Ron Natalie" wrote in
:

I'll argue two things here. First, for TSO-91c ELT's the
instructions for the continued maintenance are spelled out
specifically in the manual, including how to change the batteries.
There's no requirement to do the G switch test (nor any overriding
need to do so). That only has to be done every 12 months.


Very true. More specifically, the ELT battery life limit has been
around for many decades. The G-switch test requirement is what, 10
years old?

However, even if such testing were required, I argue the the
owner-pilot is still authorized to return it to service. After I
replace my main aircraft battery you can be danged sure I'm going to
test it before returning the aircraft to service.


I think we all agree that you can clearly test the ELT (within the other
limits set forth as to when and how such testing should be done). I
would recommend it.

Unfortunately, my reading (and this is purely my reading, nothing I have
seen from the FAA) is that this testing does NOT replace the required
yearly test of the ELT. That, it would appear, must be done by an A&P
and or IA.

You're making requirements that don't exist in the regulations. As
for changing internal batteries in things not designed to be easily
accessible, that is covered by the initial phrase in 43xA.c
"Preventive maintenance is limited to the following work provided it
does not involve complex assembly operations."


Lots of the Part 43.13 regs have that "complex assembly" phrase. I have
never seen a definitive statement on what that means. To my mother it
should probably include changing batteries in a flashlight. But I
replace surface mount components on multilayer PCB's all the time.
Pulling the cover of my ELT (six screws) and one molex connector hardly
constitutes "complex" in my book.

I would love for the definition of complex assembly to be "assemblies
involving tools and techniques not familiar to the operator" - but
somehow that seems entirely too reasonable. Has anyone ever seen an FAA
definition?

-----------------------------------------------
James M. Knox
TriSoft ph 512-385-0316
1109-A Shady Lane fax 512-366-4331
Austin, Tx 78721
-----------------------------------------------
  #28  
Old November 20th 03, 05:49 PM
Jim Weir
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Posts: n/a
Default


You mean prior to the incident/accident?

{;-)

Jim



"James M. Knox"
shared these priceless pearls of wisdom:

-
-I would love for the definition of complex assembly to be "assemblies
-involving tools and techniques not familiar to the operator" - but
-somehow that seems entirely too reasonable. Has anyone ever seen an FAA
-definition?

Jim Weir (A&P/IA, CFI, & other good alphabet soup)
VP Eng RST Pres. Cyberchapter EAA Tech. Counselor
http://www.rst-engr.com
  #29  
Old September 16th 10, 02:47 PM
Scott Morgan Scott Morgan is offline
Junior Member
 
First recorded activity by AviationBanter: Sep 2010
Posts: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gross_arrow View Post
"Kevin Chandler" wrote in message ...
One additional thing I thought of is.....

Why do ground schools teach all of the rules of when you can test the ELT
( first 5 minutes of each hour ) if you are not authorized to test it?

Anyone else find this curious?
Kevin



'cuz that's what the aim says: 6-2-5:

b. Testing.

1. ELT's should be tested in accordance with the
manufacturer's instructions, preferably in a shielded or
screened room or specially designed test container to
prevent the broadcast of signals which could trigger a false
alert.

2. When this cannot be done, aircraft operational testing is
authorized as follows:

(a) Analog 121.5/243 MHz ELT's should only
be tested during the first 5 minutes after any
hour. If operational tests must be made outside
of this period, they should be coordinated with
the nearest FAA Control Tower or FSS. Tests
should be no longer than three audible sweeps.
If the antenna is removable, a dummy load
should be substituted during test procedures.

(b) Digital 406 MHz ELT's should only be tested
in accordance with the unit's manufacturer's
instructions.

(c) Airborne tests are not authorized.



you can do this test, but this doesn't satisfy the requirement of
91.207(d), which includes a test of the "crash sensor". the ai
must do this test (i think he drops it on the floor or something).
anyway, that's my take, fwiw.

g_a

I am the former commander of the Air Force Coordination Center (AFRCC) and I now work for ACR Electronics. As already implied, you can't test the 406 MHz ELT at the top of the hour like the 121.5 without getting a call from the AFRCC. When I left active duty, a small group of us got together and came up with a testing site that allows you test the 406 ELT like you did with the 121.5 called 406Link.com. We recently launched a new website called 406Test.com which satisfies the requirement for initial and annual testing of the ELT. Plus, it doesnít require any expensive ELT testing equipment. If you want to make sure the 406 MHz ELT is installed correctly and the ELT is transmitting to the satellites use www.406Test.com service. You receive a confirmation SMS text message when you perform a self test of an installed 406 ELT, seconds after you perform the test. By using the service you know (1) that the beacon is transmitting with enough power, (2) the antenna is working and properly installed and (3) the satellites have picked up the signal. Also, you donít need a screen room because you do it onboard the aircraft. If you have any questions please contact me.
 




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