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The number of registered drone operators exceeds the number of manned aircraft pilots



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 10th 16, 04:12 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Larry Dighera
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,780
Default The number of registered drone operators exceeds the number of manned aircraft pilots

Drone Avoidance: More Than Flying High

By Rick Durden

Without nearly enough fanfare, some excellent guidance on a subject that is
becoming increasingly critical for pilots was released two weeks ago. Entitled
Flight Safety in the Drone Age (FSDA)
http://www.secureav.com/DroneAge-Brochure-v1.0.pdf, it is a three-page
document that should be read and digested by every pilot. While the FAA has
enacted regulations concerning drone operations and the respected Academy of
Model Aeronautics http://www.modelaircraft.org/ has long provided best
operating practices and training programs for unmanned aircraft, until now
there has been little in the way of educational material for pilots when it
comes to protecting themselves in a world where the number of registered drone
operators exceeds the number of manned aircraft pilots and the danger of
unmanned—manned inflight collision is steadily increasing.

Flight Safety in the Drone Age was developed by the Permanent Editorial Board
of the Aviator’s Model Code of Conduct (AMCC) http://www.secureav.com/
initiative, an organization dedicated to providing tools for pilots that
advance aviation safety and citizenship. It admits an unpleasant fact right up
front—we’ve relied on “see and avoid” for aircraft separation in VFR flight
operations since Orville and Wilbur built their second airplane, and with the
small size of many drones and their ability to change direction very rapidly,
“see and avoid” has to be augmented with piloting techniques and potentially,
technology, to reduce the risk of mid-air collisions.

While drones do fall under the definition of “aircraft,” the level of knowledge
about, and willingness to comply with, aviation safety requirements on the part
of their operators varies greatly. FSDA recognizes the potential problem with
human nature and drones—just as there are pilots that are stupid enough to fly
low over a crowded beach because they think it’s cool, there are drone
operators who will try to see how close they can fly their drone to an aircraft
in flight. FSDA also mentioned something that was more than a little chilling
to me: drone operators may decide to fly their drones at night (unlighted) and
in IMC in controlled airspace. [...]
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  #2  
Old June 10th 16, 09:41 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
george152
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 157
Default The number of registered drone operators exceeds the number ofmanned aircraft pilots

On 6/11/2016 3:12 AM, Larry Dighera wrote:
Drone Avoidance: More Than Flying High

By Rick Durden

Without nearly enough fanfare, some excellent guidance on a subject that is
becoming increasingly critical for pilots was released two weeks ago. Entitled
Flight Safety in the Drone Age (FSDA)
http://www.secureav.com/DroneAge-Brochure-v1.0.pdf, it is a three-page
document that should be read and digested by every pilot. While the FAA has
enacted regulations concerning drone operations and the respected Academy of
Model Aeronautics http://www.modelaircraft.org/ has long provided best
operating practices and training programs for unmanned aircraft, until now
there has been little in the way of educational material for pilots when it
comes to protecting themselves in a world where the number of registered drone
operators exceeds the number of manned aircraft pilots and the danger of
unmanned—manned inflight collision is steadily increasing.

Flight Safety in the Drone Age was developed by the Permanent Editorial Board
of the Aviator’s Model Code of Conduct (AMCC) http://www.secureav.com/
initiative, an organization dedicated to providing tools for pilots that
advance aviation safety and citizenship. It admits an unpleasant fact right up
front—we’ve relied on “see and avoid” for aircraft separation in VFR flight
operations since Orville and Wilbur built their second airplane, and with the
small size of many drones and their ability to change direction very rapidly,
“see and avoid” has to be augmented with piloting techniques and potentially,
technology, to reduce the risk of mid-air collisions.

While drones do fall under the definition of “aircraft,” the level of knowledge
about, and willingness to comply with, aviation safety requirements on the part
of their operators varies greatly. FSDA recognizes the potential problem with
human nature and drones—just as there are pilots that are stupid enough to fly
low over a crowded beach because they think it’s cool, there are drone
operators who will try to see how close they can fly their drone to an aircraft
in flight. FSDA also mentioned something that was more than a little chilling
to me: drone operators may decide to fly their drones at night (unlighted) and
in IMC in controlled airspace. [...]


And that -is- scary..
What of the 'flying car' idea doing the rounds lately?
People unsafe behind the wheel are going to fly around in some remotely
controlled machine.... ?
Perhaps the flight deck will have a drone detector to further complicate
the pilots job
  #3  
Old June 12th 16, 04:53 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Larry Dighera
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,780
Default The number of registered drone operators exceeds the number of manned aircraft pilots

On Sat, 11 Jun 2016 08:41:43 +1200, george152 wrote:

On 6/11/2016 3:12 AM, Larry Dighera wrote:
Drone Avoidance: More Than Flying High

By Rick Durden

Without nearly enough fanfare, some excellent guidance on a subject that is
becoming increasingly critical for pilots was released two weeks ago. Entitled
Flight Safety in the Drone Age (FSDA)
http://www.secureav.com/DroneAge-Brochure-v1.0.pdf, it is a three-page
document that should be read and digested by every pilot. While the FAA has
enacted regulations concerning drone operations and the respected Academy of
Model Aeronautics http://www.modelaircraft.org/ has long provided best
operating practices and training programs for unmanned aircraft, until now
there has been little in the way of educational material for pilots when it
comes to protecting themselves in a world where the number of registered drone
operators exceeds the number of manned aircraft pilots and the danger of
unmanned—manned inflight collision is steadily increasing.

Flight Safety in the Drone Age was developed by the Permanent Editorial Board
of the Aviator’s Model Code of Conduct (AMCC) http://www.secureav.com/
initiative, an organization dedicated to providing tools for pilots that
advance aviation safety and citizenship. It admits an unpleasant fact right up
front—we’ve relied on “see and avoid” for aircraft separation in VFR flight
operations since Orville and Wilbur built their second airplane, and with the
small size of many drones and their ability to change direction very rapidly,
“see and avoid” has to be augmented with piloting techniques and potentially,
technology, to reduce the risk of mid-air collisions.

While drones do fall under the definition of “aircraft,” the level of knowledge
about, and willingness to comply with, aviation safety requirements on the part
of their operators varies greatly. FSDA recognizes the potential problem with
human nature and drones—just as there are pilots that are stupid enough to fly
low over a crowded beach because they think it’s cool, there are drone
operators who will try to see how close they can fly their drone to an aircraft
in flight. FSDA also mentioned something that was more than a little chilling
to me: drone operators may decide to fly their drones at night (unlighted) and
in IMC in controlled airspace. [...]


And that -is- scary..


It's not scary for the drone operators. :-)

But hey, it's a "big sky," right? Not to worry. :-)

What of the 'flying car' idea doing the rounds lately?
People unsafe behind the wheel are going to fly around in some remotely
controlled machine.... ?
Perhaps the flight deck will have a drone detector to further complicate
the pilots job


I'm not aware of remotely piloted flying car projects. Have you got a link?

It's beginning to look like there's a decided transition away from human
drivers and pilots toward electronic control. Add neural network integration,
and it may even work satisfactorily. My concern is that the designers have
made the circuits EMP/CME proof. Imagine sitting in the cab of your
self-driving car reading the morning news on the road at 70 MPH when the sun
(or a terrorist or military) belches electromagnetic radiation strong enough to
disrupt the computerized guidance electronics. Who you guna sue? :-(

GPS Interference NOTAM For Southwest
http://www.avweb.com/eletter/archives/101/3322-full.html
NOTAM

https://www.faasafety.gov/files/notices/2016/Jun/CHLK_16-08_GPS_Flight_Advisory.pdf
is warning operators of "all aircraft relying on GPS" of widespread
GPS outages starting next week throughout the Southwest and especially
southern California. Although the FAA doesn't go into detail, it would seem
the military is testing something that can disrupt GPS over a huge area,
centered on China Lake, California, home of the Navy's China Lake Naval
Weapons Center. On Tuesday, June 7, the FAA is warning that GPS signals
down to 50 feet AGL could be “unreliable or unavailable” between 9:30 a.m.
and 3:30 p.m. local time over a radius of 253 nautical miles, which
includes the L.A. Basin, Bay area and Las Vegas. There will be further
outages of similar potential duration June 9, 21,23, 28 and 30. The circles
expand with altitude and at 40,000 feet the interference will affect a
circular area of the Southwest 950 nautical miles across, reaching central
Oregon, Colorado and New Mexico.

The tests will potentially knock out all GPS-reliant services including
WAAS, GBAS and, notably, ADS-B. The FAA also doesn’t want a lot of radio
chatter about the outages and is urging pilots to report them if they need
help from ATC. Operators of Embraer Phenom 300 business jets are being
urged to avoid the area entirely. “Due to GPS Interference impacts
potentially affecting Embraer 300 aircraft flight stability controls, FAA
recommends EMB Phenom pilots avoid the … testing area and closely monitor
flight control systems,” the Notam reads.


And then there's "Air Uber" on the horizon:
http://www.avweb.com/eletter/archives/101/3326-full.html
Hang, a Chinese company developing a passenger-carrying drone, plans to
conduct flight tests in Nevada in hopes of certifying its 184 Autonomous
Aerial Vehicle. EHang, which has set up branch offices in Asia, Europe and
the U.S., won the attention of Nevada officials in January at the Consumer
Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

And

Autonomous System Can Fly Any Helicopter
http://www.avweb.com/eletter/archives/102/3323-full.html
Aurora Flight Sciences has successfully tested new technology that will
enable pilots to remotely fly standard helicopters, the U.S. Defense
Department said last week. The sensor package, called the Autonomous Aerial
Cargo/Utility System, or AACUS, enables a soldier to control the aircraft
via an intuitive application on a tablet computer.
  #4  
Old July 14th 16, 09:41 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 58
Default The number of registered drone operators exceeds the number ofmanned aircraft pilots

On Friday, June 10, 2016 at 11:12:45 AM UTC-4, Larry Dighera wrote:
Drone Avoidance: More Than Flying High


---

"Buck Rogers" operating the controls of a remotely piloted "air ball". Amazing Stories (March 1929):

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...lordsofhan.png

---
 




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