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Leak proof tubes



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 6th 05, 02:41 PM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Leak proof tubes

A while back...Last Summer there was a theread about the new leak
proof innertubes for aircraft tires. (I've forgottten the name), but
at any rate I wanted to add that I've had them on the mains since last
spring and still haven't had to pump them up except once about a month
after the instalation of the new tires. It's a long way from every
two weeks.

Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
(N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
www.rogerhalstead.com

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  #2  
Old December 6th 05, 03:34 PM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Leak proof tubes

Same here. I have lpt on the mains and an old tube on the nose. I
have to air the nose tire every couple of weeks but the mains can
sometimes go for 6 weeks.

  #3  
Old December 6th 05, 10:36 PM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Leak proof tubes

On 2005-12-06, Paul kgyy wrote:
Same here. I have lpt on the mains and an old tube on the nose. I
have to air the nose tire every couple of weeks but the mains can
sometimes go for 6 weeks.


I'll mention again how surprised I was as an owner the first time I put
an air gauge on my tires. "Slightly low" looking aircraft tires might
have half the recommended pressure in them. The first time I reinflated
my tires I realized that every rental I'd ever flow had "flat" tires.

--
Ben Jackson

http://www.ben.com/
  #4  
Old December 7th 05, 03:56 PM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Leak proof tubes

I'll mention again how surprised I was as an owner the first time I put
an air gauge on my tires. "Slightly low" looking aircraft tires might
have half the recommended pressure in them. The first time I reinflated
my tires I realized that every rental I'd ever flow had "flat" tires.


I get to see a lot of airplanes, and most of the people I'm picking up at
the airport are getting out of aircraft that have flat tires.

We air ours up every few weeks, but they are always down at least 25%.
It's a royal PIA when the high temperature is predicted to be 0 F.

Face it: aircraft tires are expensive pieces of sh*t.
--
Jay Honeck
Iowa City, IA
Pathfinder N56993
www.AlexisParkInn.com
"Your Aviation Destination"


  #5  
Old December 7th 05, 04:09 PM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Leak proof tubes

Jay Honeck wrote:
I'll mention again how surprised I was as an owner the first time I put
an air gauge on my tires. "Slightly low" looking aircraft tires might
have half the recommended pressure in them. The first time I reinflated
my tires I realized that every rental I'd ever flow had "flat" tires.


I get to see a lot of airplanes, and most of the people I'm picking up at
the airport are getting out of aircraft that have flat tires.

We air ours up every few weeks, but they are always down at least 25%.
It's a royal PIA when the high temperature is predicted to be 0 F.

Face it: aircraft tires are expensive pieces of sh*t.


They may well be, but if you want inner tubes that don't leak, try the
Michelin stuff. They're amazingly good.

-jav
  #6  
Old December 7th 05, 05:03 PM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Leak proof tubes

"Javier Henderson" wrote in message
...
Michelin stuff. They're amazingly good.

-jav


http://www.desser.com/DM1172.pdf lots of tire info.

I agree with Jav. We put new AirStop tubes in our Michelin Air tires when
we bought them over 1 1/2 years ago. Original owner had 6 ply tires on the
Aztec instead of 8 ply. We've had absolutely no problems so far. We check
the pressure regularly and usually only need to add a lb or two every 6-8
weeks. I find that the most common cause of those leaks is the guy that
checked the pressure before me didn't use a wrench to tighten the stem cap.
When I snug the cap up with a wrench they are still properly inflated 8
weeks or longer. If you look inside the caps, there's a rubber seal that is
supposed to seal against the rim of the valve stem, just a little pressure
with a wrench while holding the stem with pliers and a rag will seat the
seal against the stem. Just don't over do it.

I was once told by an old timer that the reason aircraft tires and tubes
leak is because they have a higher neoprene content because neoprene resists
fuel and oil better than the high rubber content tires, but neoprene doesn't
hold air as well. Anybody know the details surrounding this or if it's
true?

Thanks,
Jim


  #7  
Old December 7th 05, 09:25 PM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Leak proof tubes

I posted this information in a previous thread in this group.
Here it is again for those who would like a better understanding.

Repeat of a posting made to this group

Aircraft inner tubes were traditionally manufactured from a natural rubber
compound.
A tire inner tube is made by taking a length of extruded "rubber" tube which
is then joined into its circular form by joining it's ends together. This
joining process is generally referred to as splicing.
Natural rubber readily bonds to itself and therefore produced the strongest
"splice".
However natural rubber is somewhat porous and results in a slow loss of air.
In the 1970's a new oil based polymer know as butyl was introduced to the
tire industry.
Butyl is non-porous and solved the problem of air loss but was very
difficult to splice into inner tubes so was only adopted for road vehicle
tubes for many years. Aircraft tubes continued to be made from natural
rubber until relatively recently.
Goodyear were an early user of butyl for inner tubes using the trade name
"Air Seal"
Therefore you have a choice, natural rubber tubes may be less prone to
failure but continually lose air or butyl tubes which may fail earlier but
you will not need airing up very often.
Me ........ I use butyl ....... Why ............ Because I designed the
machines which are now used to splice butyl inner tubes :-)
End of previous post


--
Roy
N5804F Piper Archer

"I have had some bad landings but I have never missed the runway"

"Javier Henderson" wrote in message
...
Jay Honeck wrote:
I'll mention again how surprised I was as an owner the first time I put
an air gauge on my tires. "Slightly low" looking aircraft tires might
have half the recommended pressure in them. The first time I reinflated
my tires I realized that every rental I'd ever flow had "flat" tires.


I get to see a lot of airplanes, and most of the people I'm picking up at
the airport are getting out of aircraft that have flat tires.

We air ours up every few weeks, but they are always down at least 25%.
It's a royal PIA when the high temperature is predicted to be 0 F.

Face it: aircraft tires are expensive pieces of sh*t.


They may well be, but if you want inner tubes that don't leak, try the
Michelin stuff. They're amazingly good.

-jav



  #8  
Old December 8th 05, 01:29 AM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Leak proof tubes

Javier Henderson wrote:
They may well be, but if you want inner tubes that don't leak, try the
Michelin stuff. They're amazingly good.


Or buy the Aero-Classic "Leak-Guard". It's the same tube without the
Michelin name and a higher price stamped on it. Works like a charm.
Haven't had to fill the tires in months.

-Doug

--
--------------------
Doug Vetter, ATP/CFI

http://www.dvatp.com
--------------------
  #9  
Old December 8th 05, 02:27 AM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Leak proof tubes

I think prices just took a big jump in the last few weeks.

Kent Felkins

"Doug Vetter" wrote in message
...
Javier Henderson wrote:
They may well be, but if you want inner tubes that don't leak, try the
Michelin stuff. They're amazingly good.


Or buy the Aero-Classic "Leak-Guard". It's the same tube without the
Michelin name and a higher price stamped on it. Works like a charm.
Haven't had to fill the tires in months.

-Doug

--
--------------------
Doug Vetter, ATP/CFI

http://www.dvatp.com
--------------------



  #10  
Old December 8th 05, 10:15 AM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default Leak proof tubes

On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 10:09:41 -0500, Javier Henderson
wrote:

Jay Honeck wrote:
I'll mention again how surprised I was as an owner the first time I put
an air gauge on my tires. "Slightly low" looking aircraft tires might
have half the recommended pressure in them. The first time I reinflated
my tires I realized that every rental I'd ever flow had "flat" tires.


I get to see a lot of airplanes, and most of the people I'm picking up at
the airport are getting out of aircraft that have flat tires.

We air ours up every few weeks, but they are always down at least 25%.
It's a royal PIA when the high temperature is predicted to be 0 F.

Face it: aircraft tires are expensive pieces of sh*t.


They may well be, but if you want inner tubes that don't leak, try the
Michelin stuff. They're amazingly good.


As I said, mine have been going several months now without having to
add air. "I do check the pressure every couple of weeks". Before I
had to add air at least that often.

I figure the $28 per tube is worth it.

Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
(N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
www.rogerhalstead.com

-jav

 




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