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Audio recording of RAF Lancaster under nightfighter attack



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 27th 03, 12:55 AM
Stolly
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Default Audio recording of RAF Lancaster under nightfighter attack

As far as i know this is authentic.

Does anyone know anymore about this ?

Is it indeed authentic ?

http://www.stolly.org.uk/lanc.wav

Its a 400k wav file.


  #2  
Old September 27th 03, 07:39 AM
Brian
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Sounds fake - too calm - even considering the Brit resolve.


"Stolly" wrote in message
...
As far as i know this is authentic.

Does anyone know anymore about this ?

Is it indeed authentic ?

http://www.stolly.org.uk/lanc.wav

Its a 400k wav file.




  #3  
Old September 27th 03, 02:06 PM
Stolly
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I was just having a discussion with my father about this the other day.

He was fighting with the British Army in Malaya while the US was in Vietnam
around 1965 and said that the contrast between the radio discipline used by
the RAF Hunter pilots on ground attack missions was like the difference
between night and day compared to the US pilots flying similar missions over
Vietnam.

Malaya was close enough to pick up the US comms coming out of Vietnam.

He said "Our Hunter pilots were Target 2 miles. Diving now, Tally ho" (yes
they actually said Tally ho) "the Yanks were shouting and swearing about
ground fire this and f*cking that"

So the discipline on the recording is in character, according to my father.


"Brian" wrote in message
et...
Sounds fake - too calm - even considering the Brit resolve.


"Stolly" wrote in message
...
As far as i know this is authentic.

Does anyone know anymore about this ?

Is it indeed authentic ?

http://www.stolly.org.uk/lanc.wav

Its a 400k wav file.






  #4  
Old September 30th 03, 06:58 PM
Stephen Harding
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Stolly wrote:

He was fighting with the British Army in Malaya while the US was in Vietnam
around 1965 and said that the contrast between the radio discipline used by
the RAF Hunter pilots on ground attack missions was like the difference
between night and day compared to the US pilots flying similar missions over
Vietnam.

Malaya was close enough to pick up the US comms coming out of Vietnam.

He said "Our Hunter pilots were Target 2 miles. Diving now, Tally ho" (yes
they actually said Tally ho) "the Yanks were shouting and swearing about
ground fire this and f*cking that"


So just how much "f*cking that" ground fire were RAF Hunter pilots experiencing
compared to US pilots over Vietnam?

Pilots tend to be pretty calm over training ranges too, but I'm not certain
that is very indicative of the radio discipline of the individual.


SMH
  #5  
Old September 30th 03, 09:28 PM
M. J. Powell
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Default

In message , Stephen Harding
writes
Stolly wrote:

He was fighting with the British Army in Malaya while the US was in Vietnam
around 1965 and said that the contrast between the radio discipline used by
the RAF Hunter pilots on ground attack missions was like the difference
between night and day compared to the US pilots flying similar missions over
Vietnam.

Malaya was close enough to pick up the US comms coming out of Vietnam.

He said "Our Hunter pilots were Target 2 miles. Diving now, Tally ho" (yes
they actually said Tally ho) "the Yanks were shouting and swearing about
ground fire this and f*cking that"


So just how much "f*cking that" ground fire were RAF Hunter pilots experiencing
compared to US pilots over Vietnam?

Pilots tend to be pretty calm over training ranges too, but I'm not certain
that is very indicative of the radio discipline of the individual.


The RT during the Bob was pretty rough according to some stories. To the
extent that higher command wanted to replace the WAAF operators with
men.

Mike
--
M.J.Powell
  #6  
Old October 1st 03, 09:07 PM
Stolly
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Default

Probably similar amounts, since the US pilots in question were flying over
the south, as far as could be assertained.

As they got further north they couldn't be heard unless there were pretty
high.

"Stephen Harding" wrote in message
...
Stolly wrote:

He was fighting with the British Army in Malaya while the US was in

Vietnam
around 1965 and said that the contrast between the radio discipline used

by
the RAF Hunter pilots on ground attack missions was like the difference
between night and day compared to the US pilots flying similar missions

over
Vietnam.

Malaya was close enough to pick up the US comms coming out of Vietnam.

He said "Our Hunter pilots were Target 2 miles. Diving now, Tally ho"

(yes
they actually said Tally ho) "the Yanks were shouting and swearing about
ground fire this and f*cking that"


So just how much "f*cking that" ground fire were RAF Hunter pilots

experiencing
compared to US pilots over Vietnam?

Pilots tend to be pretty calm over training ranges too, but I'm not

certain
that is very indicative of the radio discipline of the individual.


SMH



  #7  
Old October 2nd 03, 12:14 AM
Gordon
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Default

I have a wave file of a VN-era rescue going bad - a Jolly enters into a pick up
zone over a downed pilot and are promptly driven off by a blizzard of small
arms fire. The voices are professional but not entirely "calm" as they are in
direct fire from the enemy that they cannot see.

A pilot reacts to the sight of the H-2 getting raked as it pulls in over the
survivor and yells, "Get out of there buddy - you were recievin' fire that
time!" He replies stoicly, "We're takin' fire every time."

After a pause, he came back on the air, over the sound of his own
disintegrating helicopter, "We've been shot... out of the ... sky.." at which
point the transmission ends.

I think judging an entire Air Force's radio discipline and drawing conclusions
as to their professionalism based on the comments made during a combat
encounter is rather churlish, when its done from the comfort of a computer
chair in someone's home.

Gordon
====(A+C====
USN SAR Aircrew

"Got anything on your radar, SENSO?"
"Nothing but my forehead, sir."
  #8  
Old September 27th 03, 09:03 PM
av8r
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Default

Hi Brian

This whole thing stinks. Couple of points:

The Nav says half a minute to go..for what, the I.P. because later the
bomb aimer says the bombs going in about a minute. In the meantime
someone (the Nav?) is saying keep weaving.

The R.A.F. used the term Bomb Aimer NOT Bombardier. BTW, you never here
the Bomb Aimer say 'Bombs Gone'

There was no drone of engines in the background even with the pilot and
other crew members talking with O2 masks on you would have heard
something.

All the wartime R.C.A.F. and R.A.F. pilots I know, used individual names
of their crew versus crew position when calling them on the intercom.

The skipper asks the engineer to put the revs up. To what RPM?

The recording device would have been connected to the intercom system.
Only one person can talk at a time yet we here a number of the crew
cheering over the supposed shoot down of a unidentified Luftwaffe
aircraft. I don't think they had hot mikes back then.
Maybe our resident Lanc F/E Gord Beaman can answer that question.

How could the pilot see the aircraft going down, as it would be well
behind him by the time he says anything about it, even if the aircraft
had been shot down while making a head on attack.

There are other things that don't sound right but I'll leave it at that
for now.

Cheers...Chris









  #9  
Old September 27th 03, 11:39 PM
Stolly
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Posts: n/a
Default

FYI with the help of a number of other people we have proved this recording
to be authenic.

"Wynford Vaughn Thomas did a trip to Berlin on 3 Sep 1943 to make the famous
BBC recording, broadcast in the Home Service on 4th September 1943 and many
times since, of a Lancaster crew on a bombing raid. This included the
shooting down of an attacking fighter"

Discussion thread here

http://www.hitechcreations.com/forum...pagenu mber=1

"av8r" wrote in message
...
Hi Brian

This whole thing stinks. Couple of points:

The Nav says half a minute to go..for what, the I.P. because later the
bomb aimer says the bombs going in about a minute. In the meantime
someone (the Nav?) is saying keep weaving.

The R.A.F. used the term Bomb Aimer NOT Bombardier. BTW, you never here
the Bomb Aimer say 'Bombs Gone'

There was no drone of engines in the background even with the pilot and
other crew members talking with O2 masks on you would have heard
something.

All the wartime R.C.A.F. and R.A.F. pilots I know, used individual names
of their crew versus crew position when calling them on the intercom.

The skipper asks the engineer to put the revs up. To what RPM?

The recording device would have been connected to the intercom system.
Only one person can talk at a time yet we here a number of the crew
cheering over the supposed shoot down of a unidentified Luftwaffe
aircraft. I don't think they had hot mikes back then.
Maybe our resident Lanc F/E Gord Beaman can answer that question.

How could the pilot see the aircraft going down, as it would be well
behind him by the time he says anything about it, even if the aircraft
had been shot down while making a head on attack.

There are other things that don't sound right but I'll leave it at that
for now.

Cheers...Chris











  #10  
Old September 28th 03, 11:14 AM
M. J. Powell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In message , Stolly
writes
FYI with the help of a number of other people we have proved this recording
to be authenic.

"Wynford Vaughn Thomas did a trip to Berlin on 3 Sep 1943 to make the famous
BBC recording, broadcast in the Home Service on 4th September 1943 and many
times since, of a Lancaster crew on a bombing raid. This included the
shooting down of an attacking fighter"


That's the one that I remember, sorry for false attribution to Richard
D. I remember the tremor in WVT's voice and wondering whether it was
fear or the vibration of the aircraft.

Mike

Discussion thread here

http://www.hitechcreations.com/forum...readid=97116&p
erpage=50&pagenumber=1

"av8r" wrote in message
...
Hi Brian

This whole thing stinks. Couple of points:

The Nav says half a minute to go..for what, the I.P. because later the
bomb aimer says the bombs going in about a minute. In the meantime
someone (the Nav?) is saying keep weaving.

The R.A.F. used the term Bomb Aimer NOT Bombardier. BTW, you never here
the Bomb Aimer say 'Bombs Gone'

There was no drone of engines in the background even with the pilot and
other crew members talking with O2 masks on you would have heard
something.

All the wartime R.C.A.F. and R.A.F. pilots I know, used individual names
of their crew versus crew position when calling them on the intercom.

The skipper asks the engineer to put the revs up. To what RPM?

The recording device would have been connected to the intercom system.
Only one person can talk at a time yet we here a number of the crew
cheering over the supposed shoot down of a unidentified Luftwaffe
aircraft. I don't think they had hot mikes back then.
Maybe our resident Lanc F/E Gord Beaman can answer that question.

How could the pilot see the aircraft going down, as it would be well
behind him by the time he says anything about it, even if the aircraft
had been shot down while making a head on attack.

There are other things that don't sound right but I'll leave it at that
for now.

Cheers...Chris












--
M.J.Powell
 




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