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Ground tests & pilot logbook.



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 10th 04, 04:47 AM
Paul Lee
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Default Ground tests & pilot logbook.

Just a curious question here. Normally when I fly, my pilot logbook
time starts when the hobbs meter starts ticking. That includes probably
10 minutes of taxing, runnup, etc.

What about taxing tests on a experimental? Does that count?
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  #3  
Old February 10th 04, 07:31 AM
Big John
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Paul

In military you started your time as you started your takeoff roll.
You continued to log time until engine shut down in parking area.

Guess they thought that if you had to hold for take off it shouldn't
count and after landing there was not much traffic taxing to bump your
time.

In GA I logged the Hobbs. Lets see what other people do.

Big John



On 9 Feb 2004 20:47:53 -0800, (Paul Lee) wrote:

Just a curious question here. Normally when I fly, my pilot logbook
time starts when the hobbs meter starts ticking. That includes probably
10 minutes of taxing, runnup, etc.

What about taxing tests on a experimental? Does that count?


  #4  
Old February 10th 04, 11:56 AM
nauga
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"Paul Lee" wrote:

What about taxing tests on a experimental? Does that count?


Taxi time only counts when it's done in order to fly.
Ground tests in and of themselves should be logged
in the _airplane_ record (I recorded time from
startup to shutdown) but not in the pilot's log.

From CFR 14 Part 1.1, definitions:

Flight time means:

(1) Pilot time that commences when an aircraft moves under its own power for
the purpose of flight and ends when the aircraft comes to rest after
landing; ...

It's that 'purpose of flight' thing that gets you.

Dave 'iced in' Hyde


  #6  
Old February 11th 04, 12:38 AM
Matthew P. Cummings
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On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 19:14:29 -0500, Jim Carriere wrote:

Of course Ron, you're right, the .1 or .2 between startup and taking the
runway technically aren't supposed to be logged.


Yes, they can be logged if the purpose was to fly. If you taxi'd over to
the pump and back to the hangar it doesn't count.

  #7  
Old February 11th 04, 12:55 AM
nauga
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Jim Carriere wrote

Of course Ron, you're right, the .1 or .2 between startup and taking the
runway technically aren't supposed to be logged.


If you're taxiing out in order to intentionally fly it
sure is loggable as flight time. I posted the FAA's
definition of flight time elsewhere in the thread.

As for how to measure logged time, I don't have a
Hobbs or a reliable recording tach in the cockpit.
I use 'wris****ch' time.

Dave 'not P-51 time' Hyde








  #8  
Old February 11th 04, 01:11 AM
Morgans
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"Jim Carriere" wrote

Also, I'm pretty sure I
got air under all four of my car tires (at the same time) once or twice a
lot time ago, but that's a logbook entry better left out...


Those of you in Northwest Ohio, and many of the other flat states, are
familiar with the "humps" that all of the railroad tracks are on. For those
of you that are not, they are about the greatest jump ramps made. Some are
even fantastic.

Most front engine cars will jump, and land *very* front heavy. Ask a friend
of mine, how that hole got in the oil pan of his parent's caddy. g I had
a Corvair. They jump very nicely. I regularly cleared a whole second of
airtime, and perhaps a bit more.

After I bought my new car, my brother got the Corvair. It died of tin worm,
and from the front unibody allowing the tops of the tires to be closer
together than the bottoms.. not good.

I later found my brother had made the track jumping into a whole new art
form....
--
Jim in NC


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  #9  
Old February 11th 04, 01:57 AM
Ron Wanttaja
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On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 19:14:29 -0500, "Jim Carriere"
wrote:

"Ron Wanttaja" wrote in message


IIRC, you're supposed to log from the point "the aircraft first takes
movement for flight." If the purpose of the engine start is something
other than flight, you don't log it.


I think counting the time on the Hobbs meter comes from the way you pay for
aircraft rental... most places charge for the time on the meter, so you
might as well log it. If it's your own aircraft, your maintenance schedule
probably runs off the Hobbs meter, so you're still paying for that time.


Actually, I believe maintenance schedules are usually driven by tach time.
I got a hobbs meter in my plane, but I'm gonna chuck the thing one of these
days. Never look at it.

Of course Ron, you're right, the .1 or .2 between startup and taking the
runway technically aren't supposed to be logged.


Thanks, but I apparently wasn't clear: If the purpose of the engine start
is to take the airplane to the runway, I feel the time should be logged as
flight time. Ditto for the taxi back to the tiedown/hangar after landing.
If you stop at the gas pumps on the way, you *don't* log the time from the
pumps to the hangar...the purpose of the movement was not flight.

Years ago, I pointed out this philosophy had an interesting loophole: I
could log "flight time" when I was *not* in the airplane. Y'see, the club
Fly Baby didn't have a starter, hence I had to hand-prop it. When the
engine started, the thrust would pull the airplane slightly forward, onto
the chocks or the limit of the tiedown rope. The airplane "was taking
movement for flight," though there wasn't anyone in the cockpit.

And don't forget: The flight isn't over 'till the wheels are chocked.
Can't do THAT from the cockpit, either. :-)

Ron Wanttaja
  #10  
Old February 11th 04, 02:56 PM
Barnyard BOb
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As for how to measure logged time, I don't have a
Hobbs or a reliable recording tach in the cockpit.
I use 'wris****ch' time.

Dave 'not P-51 time' Hyde

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

KISS.

However, you cannot believe how pricey
and elaborate some doods can get in the
name of flying.... even with a wris****ch.


Barnyard BOb - anybody seen my $9.99 Timex?
 




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