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2020 Accidents & Insurance, usa



 
 
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  #21  
Old May 23rd 20, 12:21 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default 2020 Accidents & Insurance, usa

On Friday, May 22, 2020 at 6:02:38 PM UTC-4, Dave Nadler wrote:
On Friday, May 22, 2020 at 6:45:04 AM UTC-4, Dave Walsh wrote:
I've never heard of or seen an accidental release; doubtless
they happen but the results are not, I assume, fatal for the
poor tug pilot.


A guy I knew accidentally released on tow and went into trees.
I don't keep hand on release, but I do practice grabbing it
to make sure I can do it quickly...


That has happened more than once.
One trick that is useful on gliders with low, center mounted releases that are are a bit harder to find, is to put a loop of parachute cord on the release that you can lay across your left thigh. Easy to find and pull with no looking. Gerhard Waibel came up with that idea after he couldn't find the release quick enough. His next glider design, and all after that, had it up on the left cockpit wall where it is easy to locate and pull.
FWIW
UH
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  #22  
Old May 23rd 20, 12:46 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
son_of_flubber
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Default 2020 Accidents & Insurance, usa

On Friday, May 22, 2020 at 6:02:38 PM UTC-4, Dave Nadler wrote:
.... I do practice grabbing it
to make sure I can do it quickly...


Part of my prelaunch routine is to grab the release three times. One day the towplane's right gear collapsed. I was already flying in ground effect, but I managed to release, yaw and avoid collision.

I have to stretch a little to reach the release handle, so prior to 'practicing the grab' I held a 12" lanyard tied to the handle. One day I hit rough air towards the end of the runway (~30 AGL) and accidentally pulled the release handle ~1/4". If it had released, I would have landed in the trees. I favor finger tips on top of the release handle if possible.

I'm hoping my 'grab rehearsal' will speed up release. When the towplane gear collapsed on me, I only thought to 'pull release' after I saw the prop throwing up dirt, and after I thought it, there was a moment of delay.

  #23  
Old May 23rd 20, 04:26 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Tom BravoMike
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Default 2020 Accidents & Insurance, usa

It did happen to me in 2006 in a LS4 in Minden, low altitude, but landed safely. A sudden bump in the air caused me to release prematurely. I just keep my left hand on my left knee since then - it could be the release or the airbrakes or a fly in my nose that the hand will have to go to.


Late to this thread but years ago a discussion as to what to
hold with your left hand got many replies that it was
potentially dangerous to hold the release knob! (Sounds
rubbish to me). The thinking was that the pilot might
accidentally release the low. In the UK I was taught (many
many decades ago) to hold the release. A surprising number
of people said this was wrong?
A quick trawl of YouTube videos shows most pilots not holding
the release during the launch!
I've never heard of or seen an accidental release; doubtless
they happen but the results are not, I assume, fatal for the
poor tug pilot.


  #24  
Old May 23rd 20, 08:06 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
2G
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Default 2020 Accidents & Insurance, usa

On Friday, May 22, 2020 at 8:26:18 PM UTC-7, Tom BravoMike wrote:
It did happen to me in 2006 in a LS4 in Minden, low altitude, but landed safely. A sudden bump in the air caused me to release prematurely. I just keep my left hand on my left knee since then - it could be the release or the airbrakes or a fly in my nose that the hand will have to go to.


Late to this thread but years ago a discussion as to what to
hold with your left hand got many replies that it was
potentially dangerous to hold the release knob! (Sounds
rubbish to me). The thinking was that the pilot might
accidentally release the low. In the UK I was taught (many
many decades ago) to hold the release. A surprising number
of people said this was wrong?
A quick trawl of YouTube videos shows most pilots not holding
the release during the launch!
I've never heard of or seen an accidental release; doubtless
they happen but the results are not, I assume, fatal for the
poor tug pilot.


When I flew gliders on tow I had the tip of my index finger on the tow knob - no way I could inadvertently pull it. Once I forgot to hook up the elevator. Shortly after the tow started the glider started to kite; I knew immediately what the problem was and pulled the release - the towplane took off normally and was unaffected (I came out somewhat worse for the wear).

Tom
  #25  
Old May 23rd 20, 03:06 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Roy B.
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Default 2020 Accidents & Insurance, usa


Is there more info on the other accidents that happened this year even though the season barely started in most of the country?


Ramy:
You can also search Google for these NTSB references:

ERA20CA116 (Blanik L-23 totaled 3/1/20 on "practice" rope break)

ERA20CA151 (Pipstrel Sinus attempted engine start at low altitude on 4/10/20)

ROY
  #26  
Old May 24th 20, 01:13 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Dave Walsh[_2_]
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Default 2020 Accidents & Insurance, usa

OK, so there are accidents out there following premature
release of (aero)tow but one might expect the pilot to fly the
plane neatly to the accident site, not to spin-in?
There are plenty of European/UK airfields where a low rope
break or a premature release will result in an accident
(vineyards, rocky river beds, orchards etc), it's risk one
accepts.
Maybe pedantic but "premature aerotow release" and
"spinning-in" are two different accidents, no?


  #27  
Old May 24th 20, 11:17 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default 2020 Accidents & Insurance, usa

I have spoken to two tow pilots who have had a tug upset (kiting) and both said it happened very fast and both recovered very low and if you are behind them and even think of getting high expect to have the rope.

Remember if something goes wrong either kiting or a tug engine problem they are likely to disappear from your view very quickly and you need to release then. Myself I keep my hand near the release the entire tow.

As for all safety matters just remember the rule have mostly been written in blood.

Yes gliding can be safe if you follow the rules and keep well within your limits but get it wrong only a tiny bit it will bite hard.

Arie

  #28  
Old May 25th 20, 12:23 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default 2020 Accidents & Insurance, usa

I hope I am wrong but I suspect it will be a bad year. If you are living in a chronic elevated fear state you are in no position to safely fly. Don't take my word for it, use the IMSAFE checklist. May the Lord have mercy on our insurance rates.
  #29  
Old May 25th 20, 01:33 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default 2020 Accidents & Insurance, usa

On Sunday, May 24, 2020 at 7:23:06 PM UTC-4, wrote:
I hope I am wrong but I suspect it will be a bad year. If you are living in a chronic elevated fear state you are in no position to safely fly. Don't take my word for it, use the IMSAFE checklist. May the Lord have mercy on our insurance rates.


I do not agree with your opinion. Recognizing the increased health risk associated with Covid 19, and taking action to minimize exposure risks should have little affect on our ability to fly safely.
We do have to recognize that we are more rusty than usual and take extra care with assembly tasks and check lists. These are things we rely on out of habit and we do lose them without practiced reinforcement.
Also wise to fly on some benign days and take an extra practice flight to get back to proper form.
The IMSAFE checklist can be a very valuable tool.
UH
 




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