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How About Story Time



 
 
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  #101  
Old May 30th 20, 02:10 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Posts: 701
Default How About Story Time

This kind of ties in to the airport vs. plowed field thread, but since it's just a story, I will post it here.

One of the best and most pleasant flying sites (primarily for hang gliders, but sailplanes are welcome) is Wallaby Ranch, near Orlando, FL and just a few miles south of Seminole Gliderport. Luxury flying, a party atmosphere and even a chef on duty. But, I digress.

One of the neighboring landowners detests having hang gliders land on his property. In the early days, the Sheriff was always called, much yelling and arm-waving ensued and everybody left in a huff. Every single time.

Malcolm Jones, the proprietor of Wallaby Ranch, finally approached the guy and explained that, although he briefed all pilots visiting Wallaby to absolutely NOT land on the property, sometimes weather and conditions would just have their way, and the only reasonably safe option was to land there.

Malcolm asked, "If it happens, what would it take to make the occurrence worth not calling the law and getting angry?" They eventually agreed that $100 for each landing would allow the glider pilot to land, receive assistance and either allow his crew to retrieve him or the landowner would escort the pilot off the property with no recriminations.

This worked for years, and may still be the agreement. I know that visitors are warned about the situation and maps of the area provided by Wallaby Ranch clearly mark the area with notice of the $100 "fee." (Malcolm has in the past covered the fee if the pilot did not have the ability to pay it himself.)

So, in about 2001, when a contest was being run from Wallaby, a certain pilot blew his final glide and landed in the notorious "Hundred Buck" field. The landowner met him, informed him that he owed an autographed photo of Benjamin Franklin, helped him load his glider on the landowner's truck and drove him back to Wallaby Ranch. He waited while the pilot made out a check for $100. Before he got in his truck, the pilot asked him, "If you make a hundred dollars on every landing, why don't you put up a windsock?" The guy laughed and drove away.

The pilot said to Malcolm and the rest of us watching the episode, "That was the nicest asshole I ever met."
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  #102  
Old May 31st 20, 11:57 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Neal Alders
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Posts: 25
Default How About Story Time

First time on this group. Hello all!
My story is truly nothing fantastic in the grand scheme of things, but today was a red-letter day for me.
Today is a few weeks shy of my 32nd anniversary in aviation, specifically soaring. June 18, 1988, I was 12 ½ years old and went for my first ride in a 2-33 with one of the regulars at Valley Soaring. Today, May 31, 2020, I went up in a 2-33 again, after nearly 21 years out of a Schweizer, and 15 years since I flew any sailplane (5 flights in 2005 in an L-23), at Treasure Coast Soaring. I introduced myself to the CFI-G as I boarded and advised him, I am a semi-experienced sailplane pilot, but have effectively been out of it for over 2 decades. We hooked up behind Bob Youngblood in his yellow 180 hp Pawnee (My Favorite) and Tom told me to go ahead and fly. Took off, moved into a reasonably stable high tow (NOT my favorite!) released in some lift, managed a few hundred foot climb, flew around a bit, had another few hundred foot climb, entered the pattern and managed a nice landing and roll up to the requested stopping point. My instructor flattered me and considered that my club check out. Apparently, even after 4 ½ years in an Airbus, I still know how to use my feet! I was quite pleased with myself! After a nearly 60-day break from any flying from this Covid induced hysteria, getting back in the air was a much-needed distraction.
32 years ago, UH, and the Valley Soaring crew took me in as a 12 ½ year old junior. I went to UH’s house on the weekends in the winters, ate well, raced RC cars, learned the art of dope and fabric, sheet metal, composite, and steel tube repair and how to fabricate, design, engineer darn near anything. I also learned how to be who I am today. Yes, UH, it is your fault!
It is because I was given the opportunity to learn so many different things from so many amazingly talented people that I am who I am today.
32 years ago, I was an annoying, over enthusiastic kid who talked too much. Today, I am an Airbus 320 Captain for a major airline with bright yellow airplanes, who still talks too much. I owe it all to my family. All my family. Blood and otherwise. I could not have done any of it without all of you.
Thanks, UH and CDM, and everyone else at Valley Soaring.

Today’s story? I am a glider pilot again. Finally. And I couldn’t be happier. Thank you.
  #103  
Old May 31st 20, 11:58 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Neal Alders
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Posts: 25
Default How About Story Time

First time on this group. Hello all!
My story is truly nothing fantastic in the grand scheme of things, but today was a red-letter day for me.
Today is a few weeks shy of my 32nd anniversary in aviation, specifically soaring. June 18, 1988, I was 12 ½ years old and went for my first ride in a 2-33 with one of the regulars at Valley Soaring. Today, May 31, 2020, I went up in a 2-33 again, after nearly 21 years out of a Schweizer, and 15 years since I flew any sailplane (5 flights in 2005 in an L-23), at Treasure Coast Soaring. I introduced myself to the CFI-G as I boarded and advised him, I am a semi-experienced sailplane pilot, but have effectively been out of it for over 2 decades. We hooked up behind Bob Youngblood in his yellow 180 hp Pawnee (My Favorite) and Tom told me to go ahead and fly. Took off, moved into a reasonably stable high tow (NOT my favorite!) released in some lift, managed a few hundred foot climb, flew around a bit, had another few hundred foot climb, entered the pattern and managed a nice landing and roll up to the requested stopping point. My instructor flattered me and considered that my club check out. Apparently, even after 4 ½ years in an Airbus, I still know how to use my feet! I was quite pleased with myself! After a nearly 60-day break from any flying from this Covid induced hysteria, getting back in the air was a much-needed distraction.
32 years ago, UH, and the Valley Soaring crew took me in as a 12 ½ year old junior. I went to UH’s house on the weekends in the winters, ate well, raced RC cars, learned the art of dope and fabric, sheet metal, composite, and steel tube repair and how to fabricate, design, engineer darn near anything. I also learned how to be who I am today. Yes, UH, it is your fault!
It is because I was given the opportunity to learn so many different things from so many amazingly talented people that I am who I am today.
32 years ago, I was an annoying, over enthusiastic kid who talked too much. Today, I am an Airbus 320 Captain for a major airline with bright yellow airplanes, who still talks too much. I owe it all to my family. All my family. Blood and otherwise. I could not have done any of it without all of you.
Thanks, UH and CDM, and everyone else at Valley Soaring.

Today’s story? I am a glider pilot again. Finally. And I couldn’t be happier. Thank you.

MS
  #104  
Old June 3rd 20, 10:23 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
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Posts: 2,123
Default How About Story Time

On Sunday, May 31, 2020 at 6:58:59 PM UTC-4, Neal Alders wrote:
First time on this group. Hello all!
My story is truly nothing fantastic in the grand scheme of things, but today was a red-letter day for me.
Today is a few weeks shy of my 32nd anniversary in aviation, specifically soaring. June 18, 1988, I was 12 ½ years old and went for my first ride in a 2-33 with one of the regulars at Valley Soaring. Today, May 31, 2020, I went up in a 2-33 again, after nearly 21 years out of a Schweizer, and 15 years since I flew any sailplane (5 flights in 2005 in an L-23), at Treasure Coast Soaring. I introduced myself to the CFI-G as I boarded and advised him, I am a semi-experienced sailplane pilot, but have effectively been out of it for over 2 decades. We hooked up behind Bob Youngblood in his yellow 180 hp Pawnee (My Favorite) and Tom told me to go ahead and fly. Took off, moved into a reasonably stable high tow (NOT my favorite!) released in some lift, managed a few hundred foot climb, flew around a bit, had another few hundred foot climb, entered the pattern and managed a nice landing and roll up to the requested stopping point. My instructor flattered me and considered that my club check out. Apparently, even after 4 ½ years in an Airbus, I still know how to use my feet! I was quite pleased with myself! After a nearly 60-day break from any flying from this Covid induced hysteria, getting back in the air was a much-needed distraction.
32 years ago, UH, and the Valley Soaring crew took me in as a 12 ½ year old junior. I went to UH’s house on the weekends in the winters, ate well, raced RC cars, learned the art of dope and fabric, sheet metal, composite, and steel tube repair and how to fabricate, design, engineer darn near anything. I also learned how to be who I am today. Yes, UH, it is your fault!
It is because I was given the opportunity to learn so many different things from so many amazingly talented people that I am who I am today.
32 years ago, I was an annoying, over enthusiastic kid who talked too much. Today, I am an Airbus 320 Captain for a major airline with bright yellow airplanes, who still talks too much. I owe it all to my family. All my family. Blood and otherwise. I could not have done any of it without all of you.
Thanks, UH and CDM, and everyone else at Valley Soaring.

Today’s story? I am a glider pilot again. Finally. And I couldn’t be happier. Thank you.

MS


I remember Neal waiting to be old enough to solo while his older sister had the keys to the 1-26 and flew all over. Finally the day came and he soloed, soon having the keys to Aunt Dianne's 1-26. He flew his first contest in that as a guest because he wasn't old enough to get the required private pilot certificate yet.
Neal got his PP glider on his 16th birthday, issued by an FAA inspector that did the check ride on a Sunday on his own time. Earlier that day he did his first airplane solo in our Super Cub. He didn't want to do it in Dad's Cardinal.
Later, with help, he restored a J3.
Then he went off to fly sky divers and build time to go to the airlines.
Maybe one of these days we'll get him back as an active glider pilot.
One of our success stories.
UH
  #105  
Old June 3rd 20, 10:47 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Neal Alders
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Posts: 25
Default How About Story Time

Working on it UH. Working on it.
Thanks, couldn't have done it without YOU!

Can't type through the tears... Allergy season. *cough cough*
  #106  
Old June 5th 20, 12:16 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Bob Youngblood
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Posts: 341
Default How About Story Time

On Wednesday, June 3, 2020 at 5:23:55 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Sunday, May 31, 2020 at 6:58:59 PM UTC-4, Neal Alders wrote:
First time on this group. Hello all!
My story is truly nothing fantastic in the grand scheme of things, but today was a red-letter day for me.
Today is a few weeks shy of my 32nd anniversary in aviation, specifically soaring. June 18, 1988, I was 12 ½ years old and went for my first ride in a 2-33 with one of the regulars at Valley Soaring. Today, May 31, 2020, I went up in a 2-33 again, after nearly 21 years out of a Schweizer, and 15 years since I flew any sailplane (5 flights in 2005 in an L-23), at Treasure Coast Soaring. I introduced myself to the CFI-G as I boarded and advised him, I am a semi-experienced sailplane pilot, but have effectively been out of it for over 2 decades. We hooked up behind Bob Youngblood in his yellow 180 hp Pawnee (My Favorite) and Tom told me to go ahead and fly. Took off, moved into a reasonably stable high tow (NOT my favorite!) released in some lift, managed a few hundred foot climb, flew around a bit, had another few hundred foot climb, entered the pattern and managed a nice landing and roll up to the requested stopping point. My instructor flattered me and considered that my club check out. Apparently, even after 4 ½ years in an Airbus, I still know how to use my feet! I was quite pleased with myself! After a nearly 60-day break from any flying from this Covid induced hysteria, getting back in the air was a much-needed distraction.
32 years ago, UH, and the Valley Soaring crew took me in as a 12 ½ year old junior. I went to UH’s house on the weekends in the winters, ate well, raced RC cars, learned the art of dope and fabric, sheet metal, composite, and steel tube repair and how to fabricate, design, engineer darn near anything. I also learned how to be who I am today. Yes, UH, it is your fault!
It is because I was given the opportunity to learn so many different things from so many amazingly talented people that I am who I am today.
32 years ago, I was an annoying, over enthusiastic kid who talked too much. Today, I am an Airbus 320 Captain for a major airline with bright yellow airplanes, who still talks too much. I owe it all to my family. All my family. Blood and otherwise. I could not have done any of it without all of you.
Thanks, UH and CDM, and everyone else at Valley Soaring.

Today’s story? I am a glider pilot again. Finally. And I couldn’t be happier. Thank you.

MS


I remember Neal waiting to be old enough to solo while his older sister had the keys to the 1-26 and flew all over. Finally the day came and he soloed, soon having the keys to Aunt Dianne's 1-26. He flew his first contest in that as a guest because he wasn't old enough to get the required private pilot certificate yet.
Neal got his PP glider on his 16th birthday, issued by an FAA inspector that did the check ride on a Sunday on his own time. Earlier that day he did his first airplane solo in our Super Cub. He didn't want to do it in Dad's Cardinal.
Later, with help, he restored a J3.
Then he went off to fly sky divers and build time to go to the airlines.
Maybe one of these days we'll get him back as an active glider pilot.
One of our success stories.
UH


I think he has the bug once again, I was laughing during the tow because I knew what Tommy was going to say, " the guy can fly"! Never question Tommy, with a PHD from MIT and Cambridge, who wants to argue. Bob
  #107  
Old June 6th 20, 12:41 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Neal Alders
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Posts: 25
Default How About Story Time

You flatter me sir. Thank you! Makes me feel better after an afternoon of pulling 50 amp 6-3 wire for my RV hookup. Getting old SUCKS!
  #108  
Old June 6th 20, 02:05 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Dan Marotta
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Posts: 4,207
Default How About Story Time

Yes, but it sure beats the alternative...

On 6/5/2020 5:41 PM, Neal Alders wrote:
You flatter me sir. Thank you! Makes me feel better after an afternoon of pulling 50 amp 6-3 wire for my RV hookup. Getting old SUCKS!


--
Dan, 5J
  #109  
Old June 6th 20, 01:47 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Neal Alders
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Posts: 25
Default How About Story Time

Very true.
  #110  
Old June 6th 20, 02:24 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Posts: 701
Default How About Story Time

When you stop getting older, you start to stink and then they bury you.

However, it is also worth remembering that it is never too late to have a happy childhood.
 




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