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sunlight readable iphone



 
 
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  #101  
Old November 7th 17, 06:43 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
jfitch
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Posts: 886
Default sunlight readable iphone

On Friday, November 3, 2017 at 5:36:41 PM UTC-7, Darryl Ramm wrote:
On Friday, November 3, 2017 at 10:16:49 AM UTC-7, jfitch wrote:
On Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 9:30:02 PM UTC-7, jfitch wrote:
On Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 5:35:55 PM UTC-7, Soartech wrote:
Just read today that the iPhone 10 will use OLED displays purchased from Samsung. Therefore don't expect miracles. They won't be any better than Samsung.

True - but Samsung OLED phones are capable of 1000 - 1200 nits, nearly double the peak brightness of the LCD based iPhone 6 and 7. Which some of us were able to read without a lot of issues. These displays can be driven quite bright, the OS decides how bright. Samsung made the choice to limit the manually controlled brightness to about 650 nits, to maintain battery life. However if you put the phone in the Auto brightness mode, it will peak the brightness to over 1000 nits in high ambient light (the Apple LCD phones have this behavior too, but are limited by the backlight). Some people may be mistakenly thinking they want the brightness set on manual at maximum - this may not result in the highest brightness, depending on the phone. By not allowing you to park the brightness at the true maximum, the manufacturers can turn it down when you walk into a building, and lower the incidence of battery life complaints.


The first reviews are starting to be posted about the iPhone X and sunlight readability. The results look quite hopeful. One reviewer says, "view-ability is insane in the sun — much, much better than the iPhone 8 LCD" and the iPhone 8 was already decent. Another measured the brightness compared with a Samsung Note 8 (supposed to be the king of brightness) and concluded the X was 40% brighter than the 8. It is a tricky subject when talking about OLED displays, because unlike an LCD each pixel can be driven to a different level. How you measure it can be deceiving. These same reviewers also found it to be subjectively better: "To get a better read on each phone, I enlisted the help of a few of my colleagues. The first thing they all pointed out was just how bright the iPhone X’s 5.8-inch display gets in comparison to its Android-powered rivals." The rivals being the Note 8 and Pixel2 XL.

Some have claimed that Apple is buying Samsung floor sweeping displays or some such. Now that more information has come out, we know that the X display was specifically designed for Apple to Apple's specs, and is driven by an Apple designed driver. It is not the same as Samsung's current or past phones. In fact someone has plausibly calculated that Samsung will make more - far more - selling OLED displays to Apple than they will make on their entire cell phone business.


Are you coming to the PASCO meeting on Saturday? Can we look at your iPhone X then? :-)


Still waiting for mine. According to Displaymate's test published today the iPhone X easily beat the Samsung Note 8 in brightness, contrast ratio, color accuracy, etc. For an average screen with 50% bright area, the 8 measures about 490 nits vs about 700 for the X. Displaymate is considered the geeky-est third party guru in the industry and pretty much the arbiter of such matters.

http://www.displaymate.com/iPhoneX_ShootOut_1a.htm
http://www.displaymate.com/Galaxy_No..._100.htm#Table

Now a new question has come up, which is: will the OLED screen suffer burn in from running iGlide at high brightness for hours on end? This could happen in the navboxes top and bottom. I am going to contact Air Avionics and see if they can add an option to decrease the contrast of those, which could be toned down and still be perfectly readable.
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  #102  
Old May 26th 18, 01:32 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default sunlight readable iphone

Yes.

I can relate : having used a brand new samsung galaxy S8 with XCsoar during a week's paragliding trip, max brightness, there are now visible burn-in marks in screen areas where infoboxes are located in xcsoar.

On Tuesday, 7 November 2017 07:43:08 UTC+1, jfitch wrote:
On Friday, November 3, 2017 at 5:36:41 PM UTC-7, Darryl Ramm wrote:
On Friday, November 3, 2017 at 10:16:49 AM UTC-7, jfitch wrote:
On Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 9:30:02 PM UTC-7, jfitch wrote:
On Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 5:35:55 PM UTC-7, Soartech wrote:
Just read today that the iPhone 10 will use OLED displays purchased from Samsung. Therefore don't expect miracles. They won't be any better than Samsung.

True - but Samsung OLED phones are capable of 1000 - 1200 nits, nearly double the peak brightness of the LCD based iPhone 6 and 7. Which some of us were able to read without a lot of issues. These displays can be driven quite bright, the OS decides how bright. Samsung made the choice to limit the manually controlled brightness to about 650 nits, to maintain battery life. However if you put the phone in the Auto brightness mode, it will peak the brightness to over 1000 nits in high ambient light (the Apple LCD phones have this behavior too, but are limited by the backlight). Some people may be mistakenly thinking they want the brightness set on manual at maximum - this may not result in the highest brightness, depending on the phone. By not allowing you to park the brightness at the true maximum, the manufacturers can turn it down when you walk into a building, and lower the incidence of battery life complaints.

The first reviews are starting to be posted about the iPhone X and sunlight readability. The results look quite hopeful. One reviewer says, "view-ability is insane in the sun — much, much better than the iPhone 8 LCD" and the iPhone 8 was already decent. Another measured the brightness compared with a Samsung Note 8 (supposed to be the king of brightness) and concluded the X was 40% brighter than the 8. It is a tricky subject when talking about OLED displays, because unlike an LCD each pixel can be driven to a different level. How you measure it can be deceiving. These same reviewers also found it to be subjectively better: "To get a better read on each phone, I enlisted the help of a few of my colleagues. The first thing they all pointed out was just how bright the iPhone X’s 5.8-inch display gets in comparison to its Android-powered rivals." The rivals being the Note 8 and Pixel2 XL.

Some have claimed that Apple is buying Samsung floor sweeping displays or some such. Now that more information has come out, we know that the X display was specifically designed for Apple to Apple's specs, and is driven by an Apple designed driver. It is not the same as Samsung's current or past phones. In fact someone has plausibly calculated that Samsung will make more - far more - selling OLED displays to Apple than they will make on their entire cell phone business.


Are you coming to the PASCO meeting on Saturday? Can we look at your iPhone X then? :-)


Still waiting for mine. According to Displaymate's test published today the iPhone X easily beat the Samsung Note 8 in brightness, contrast ratio, color accuracy, etc. For an average screen with 50% bright area, the 8 measures about 490 nits vs about 700 for the X. Displaymate is considered the geeky-est third party guru in the industry and pretty much the arbiter of such matters.

http://www.displaymate.com/iPhoneX_ShootOut_1a.htm
http://www.displaymate.com/Galaxy_No..._100.htm#Table

Now a new question has come up, which is: will the OLED screen suffer burn in from running iGlide at high brightness for hours on end? This could happen in the navboxes top and bottom. I am going to contact Air Avionics and see if they can add an option to decrease the contrast of those, which could be toned down and still be perfectly readable.


  #103  
Old May 26th 18, 04:30 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Dan Marotta
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,122
Default sunlight readable iphone

Is that something covered by warranty?

On 5/25/2018 6:32 PM, wrote:
Yes.

I can relate : having used a brand new samsung galaxy S8 with XCsoar during a week's paragliding trip, max brightness, there are now visible burn-in marks in screen areas where infoboxes are located in xcsoar.

On Tuesday, 7 November 2017 07:43:08 UTC+1, jfitch wrote:
On Friday, November 3, 2017 at 5:36:41 PM UTC-7, Darryl Ramm wrote:
On Friday, November 3, 2017 at 10:16:49 AM UTC-7, jfitch wrote:
On Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 9:30:02 PM UTC-7, jfitch wrote:
On Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 5:35:55 PM UTC-7, Soartech wrote:
Just read today that the iPhone 10 will use OLED displays purchased from Samsung. Therefore don't expect miracles. They won't be any better than Samsung.
True - but Samsung OLED phones are capable of 1000 - 1200 nits, nearly double the peak brightness of the LCD based iPhone 6 and 7. Which some of us were able to read without a lot of issues. These displays can be driven quite bright, the OS decides how bright. Samsung made the choice to limit the manually controlled brightness to about 650 nits, to maintain battery life. However if you put the phone in the Auto brightness mode, it will peak the brightness to over 1000 nits in high ambient light (the Apple LCD phones have this behavior too, but are limited by the backlight). Some people may be mistakenly thinking they want the brightness set on manual at maximum - this may not result in the highest brightness, depending on the phone. By not allowing you to park the brightness at the true maximum, the manufacturers can turn it down when you walk into a building, and lower the incidence of battery life complaints.
The first reviews are starting to be posted about the iPhone X and sunlight readability. The results look quite hopeful. One reviewer says, "view-ability is insane in the sun — much, much better than the iPhone 8 LCD" and the iPhone 8 was already decent. Another measured the brightness compared with a Samsung Note 8 (supposed to be the king of brightness) and concluded the X was 40% brighter than the 8. It is a tricky subject when talking about OLED displays, because unlike an LCD each pixel can be driven to a different level. How you measure it can be deceiving. These same reviewers also found it to be subjectively better: "To get a better read on each phone, I enlisted the help of a few of my colleagues. The first thing they all pointed out was just how bright the iPhone X’s 5.8-inch display gets in comparison to its Android-powered rivals." The rivals being the Note 8 and Pixel2 XL.

Some have claimed that Apple is buying Samsung floor sweeping displays or some such. Now that more information has come out, we know that the X display was specifically designed for Apple to Apple's specs, and is driven by an Apple designed driver. It is not the same as Samsung's current or past phones. In fact someone has plausibly calculated that Samsung will make more - far more - selling OLED displays to Apple than they will make on their entire cell phone business.
Are you coming to the PASCO meeting on Saturday? Can we look at your iPhone X then? :-)

Still waiting for mine. According to Displaymate's test published today the iPhone X easily beat the Samsung Note 8 in brightness, contrast ratio, color accuracy, etc. For an average screen with 50% bright area, the 8 measures about 490 nits vs about 700 for the X. Displaymate is considered the geeky-est third party guru in the industry and pretty much the arbiter of such matters.

http://www.displaymate.com/iPhoneX_ShootOut_1a.htm
http://www.displaymate.com/Galaxy_No..._100.htm#Table

Now a new question has come up, which is: will the OLED screen suffer burn in from running iGlide at high brightness for hours on end? This could happen in the navboxes top and bottom. I am going to contact Air Avionics and see if they can add an option to decrease the contrast of those, which could be toned down and still be perfectly readable.


--
Dan, 5J
  #104  
Old May 27th 18, 02:44 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 106
Default sunlight readable iphone

yes. Had a warranty screen replacement on a Samsung Note 8 for screen burn just last week. Those Note stylus enabled screens are expensive - ~$350 each!

RS

On Saturday, May 26, 2018 at 10:31:00 AM UTC-5, Dan Marotta wrote:
Is that something covered by warranty?

On 5/25/2018 6:32 PM, wrote:
Yes.

I can relate : having used a brand new samsung galaxy S8 with XCsoar during a week's paragliding trip, max brightness, there are now visible burn-in marks in screen areas where infoboxes are located in xcsoar.

On Tuesday, 7 November 2017 07:43:08 UTC+1, jfitch wrote:
On Friday, November 3, 2017 at 5:36:41 PM UTC-7, Darryl Ramm wrote:
On Friday, November 3, 2017 at 10:16:49 AM UTC-7, jfitch wrote:
On Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 9:30:02 PM UTC-7, jfitch wrote:
On Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 5:35:55 PM UTC-7, Soartech wrote:
Just read today that the iPhone 10 will use OLED displays purchased from Samsung. Therefore don't expect miracles. They won't be any better than Samsung.
True - but Samsung OLED phones are capable of 1000 - 1200 nits, nearly double the peak brightness of the LCD based iPhone 6 and 7. Which some of us were able to read without a lot of issues. These displays can be driven quite bright, the OS decides how bright. Samsung made the choice to limit the manually controlled brightness to about 650 nits, to maintain battery life. However if you put the phone in the Auto brightness mode, it will peak the brightness to over 1000 nits in high ambient light (the Apple LCD phones have this behavior too, but are limited by the backlight). Some people may be mistakenly thinking they want the brightness set on manual at maximum - this may not result in the highest brightness, depending on the phone. By not allowing you to park the brightness at the true maximum, the manufacturers can turn it down when you walk into a building, and lower the incidence of battery life complaints.
The first reviews are starting to be posted about the iPhone X and sunlight readability. The results look quite hopeful. One reviewer says, "view-ability is insane in the sun — much, much better than the iPhone 8 LCD" and the iPhone 8 was already decent. Another measured the brightness compared with a Samsung Note 8 (supposed to be the king of brightness) and concluded the X was 40% brighter than the 8. It is a tricky subject when talking about OLED displays, because unlike an LCD each pixel can be driven to a different level. How you measure it can be deceiving. These same reviewers also found it to be subjectively better: "To get a better read on each phone, I enlisted the help of a few of my colleagues. The first thing they all pointed out was just how bright the iPhone X’s 5.8-inch display gets in comparison to its Android-powered rivals." The rivals being the Note 8 and Pixel2 XL.

Some have claimed that Apple is buying Samsung floor sweeping displays or some such. Now that more information has come out, we know that the X display was specifically designed for Apple to Apple's specs, and is driven by an Apple designed driver. It is not the same as Samsung's current or past phones. In fact someone has plausibly calculated that Samsung will make more - far more - selling OLED displays to Apple than they will make on their entire cell phone business.
Are you coming to the PASCO meeting on Saturday? Can we look at your iPhone X then? :-)
Still waiting for mine. According to Displaymate's test published today the iPhone X easily beat the Samsung Note 8 in brightness, contrast ratio, color accuracy, etc. For an average screen with 50% bright area, the 8 measures about 490 nits vs about 700 for the X. Displaymate is considered the geeky-est third party guru in the industry and pretty much the arbiter of such matters.

http://www.displaymate.com/iPhoneX_ShootOut_1a.htm
http://www.displaymate.com/Galaxy_No..._100.htm#Table

Now a new question has come up, which is: will the OLED screen suffer burn in from running iGlide at high brightness for hours on end? This could happen in the navboxes top and bottom. I am going to contact Air Avionics and see if they can add an option to decrease the contrast of those, which could be toned down and still be perfectly readable.


--
Dan, 5J


  #105  
Old May 27th 18, 05:48 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
jfitch
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 886
Default sunlight readable iphone

On Friday, May 25, 2018 at 5:32:13 PM UTC-7, wrote:
Yes.

I can relate : having used a brand new samsung galaxy S8 with XCsoar during a week's paragliding trip, max brightness, there are now visible burn-in marks in screen areas where infoboxes are located in xcsoar.

On Tuesday, 7 November 2017 07:43:08 UTC+1, jfitch wrote:
On Friday, November 3, 2017 at 5:36:41 PM UTC-7, Darryl Ramm wrote:
On Friday, November 3, 2017 at 10:16:49 AM UTC-7, jfitch wrote:
On Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 9:30:02 PM UTC-7, jfitch wrote:
On Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 5:35:55 PM UTC-7, Soartech wrote:
Just read today that the iPhone 10 will use OLED displays purchased from Samsung. Therefore don't expect miracles. They won't be any better than Samsung.

True - but Samsung OLED phones are capable of 1000 - 1200 nits, nearly double the peak brightness of the LCD based iPhone 6 and 7. Which some of us were able to read without a lot of issues. These displays can be driven quite bright, the OS decides how bright. Samsung made the choice to limit the manually controlled brightness to about 650 nits, to maintain battery life. However if you put the phone in the Auto brightness mode, it will peak the brightness to over 1000 nits in high ambient light (the Apple LCD phones have this behavior too, but are limited by the backlight). Some people may be mistakenly thinking they want the brightness set on manual at maximum - this may not result in the highest brightness, depending on the phone. By not allowing you to park the brightness at the true maximum, the manufacturers can turn it down when you walk into a building, and lower the incidence of battery life complaints.

The first reviews are starting to be posted about the iPhone X and sunlight readability. The results look quite hopeful. One reviewer says, "view-ability is insane in the sun — much, much better than the iPhone 8 LCD" and the iPhone 8 was already decent. Another measured the brightness compared with a Samsung Note 8 (supposed to be the king of brightness) and concluded the X was 40% brighter than the 8. It is a tricky subject when talking about OLED displays, because unlike an LCD each pixel can be driven to a different level. How you measure it can be deceiving. These same reviewers also found it to be subjectively better: "To get a better read on each phone, I enlisted the help of a few of my colleagues. The first thing they all pointed out was just how bright the iPhone X’s 5.8-inch display gets in comparison to its Android-powered rivals." The rivals being the Note 8 and Pixel2 XL.

Some have claimed that Apple is buying Samsung floor sweeping displays or some such. Now that more information has come out, we know that the X display was specifically designed for Apple to Apple's specs, and is driven by an Apple designed driver. It is not the same as Samsung's current or past phones. In fact someone has plausibly calculated that Samsung will make more - far more - selling OLED displays to Apple than they will make on their entire cell phone business.

Are you coming to the PASCO meeting on Saturday? Can we look at your iPhone X then? :-)


Still waiting for mine. According to Displaymate's test published today the iPhone X easily beat the Samsung Note 8 in brightness, contrast ratio, color accuracy, etc. For an average screen with 50% bright area, the 8 measures about 490 nits vs about 700 for the X. Displaymate is considered the geeky-est third party guru in the industry and pretty much the arbiter of such matters.

http://www.displaymate.com/iPhoneX_ShootOut_1a.htm
http://www.displaymate.com/Galaxy_No..._100.htm#Table

Now a new question has come up, which is: will the OLED screen suffer burn in from running iGlide at high brightness for hours on end? This could happen in the navboxes top and bottom. I am going to contact Air Avionics and see if they can add an option to decrease the contrast of those, which could be toned down and still be perfectly readable.


Just flew for the first time with the iPhone X today, running iGlide. The screen is easily readable in any condition (and it was a bright sunny day), even with the brightness turned down a little. Don't see any screen burn yet, but it was only maybe 3 hours.

Apple, like Samsung, says the "some changes in the display are normal" or words to that effect. But the way cell phones are sold these days, you don't really buy them, you rent them, so you can turn it in for a new one periodically.
 




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