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good book about prisoners of war



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 27th 03, 05:12 AM
Jim Atkins
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Default good book about prisoners of war

There was a camp in Phoenix- some of the German POWs heard that they were
not too far from the Salt River, so they put together some kind of raft and
got through the wire. Imagine their disappointment at reaching the
rock-strewn ditch that passes for a river in Arizona. Incidentally, they got
caught.

--
Jim Atkins
Twentynine Palms CA USA

"Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend.
Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read."
- Groucho Marx


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  #2  
Old July 27th 03, 08:23 PM
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David Lesher wrote:

German POW's held in the US. I recall reading the Army shipped most
into the Midwest. (I know there was one camp in Sandusky OH area.)


Reportedly a German POW camp located near the massive U.S.
Army Sioux Ordinance Depot approximately 20 miles from Sidney,
Nebraska. When WW2 started the installation provided hundreds of
earthen bomb storage bunkers dotting the prairie, in addition to a
vast complex of warehouses that were used throughout WW2, Korea and
Vietnam. In 1967, most of the complex was turned over to area
farmers/ranchers and a community college (where I received my A&P
mechanic certificate in 1983).

-Mike Marron



  #3  
Old July 27th 03, 09:43 PM
Mary Shafer
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Default

On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 04:12:30 GMT, "Jim Atkins"
wrote:

There was a camp in Phoenix- some of the German POWs heard that they were
not too far from the Salt River, so they put together some kind of raft and
got through the wire. Imagine their disappointment at reaching the
rock-strewn ditch that passes for a river in Arizona. Incidentally, they got
caught.


There was a POW camp for Italians just north of San Bernardino (not
far from the Stringfellow Acid Pits). They only tore out the last
foundation slab a couple of years ago. Back then, that was a remote
location, although there's a river that goes to San Pedro eventually
not too far away.

Mary

--
Mary Shafer Retired aerospace research engineer

"A MiG at your six is better than no MiG at all."
Anonymous US fighter pilot
  #4  
Old July 28th 03, 05:32 AM
Dana Miller
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Default

In article ,
Cub Driver wrote:

There was a German camp in or near Tucson. The PWs built the road up
to Mt Lemmon, the improbable ski resort that burned earlier this year.

all the best -- Dan Ford
email: www.danford.net/letters.htm#9

see the Warbird's Forum at http://www.danford.net/index.htm
Vietnam | Flying Tigers | Pacific War | Brewster Buffalo | Piper Cub


There was one for German POWs outside of Lawrence KS. Ruins were still
in existance when I was there 83-89. Danforth Chapel, On the University
Grounds, was supposedly build by POW labor.

I got the feeling from what I had read about Axis POWs that they were
kept mostly in small groups (50-100), spread out throughout the
heartland. They provided farm labor.

--
Dana Miller
  #5  
Old July 28th 03, 10:54 AM
mah
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Dana Miller wrote:

I got the feeling from what I had read about Axis POWs that they were
kept mostly in small groups (50-100), spread out throughout the
heartland. They provided farm labor.

--
Dana Miller


Some of the main camps were larger. The algona IA camp held 3000
according to their web site at http://www.pwcamp.algona.org/ They also
had small camps in the 50-100 occupant range.

The Algona experience is unique. One of the prisoners built a nativity
scene that still exists and is shown at the county fairground. Another
was held within 50 miles of a relative who had emmigrated to the US
before the war.

Found some of this out while shuttling my daughter as she researched her
history day project.

MAH
  #6  
Old July 29th 03, 03:23 PM
John Burson
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German POW camp was at Fort McClellan AL. There is a very nice POW cemetery
there that is visited by German families.
wrote in message
...
David Lesher wrote:


German POW's held in the US. I recall reading the Army shipped most
into the Midwest. (I know there was one camp in Sandusky OH area.)


Reportedly a German POW camp located near the massive U.S.
Army Sioux Ordinance Depot approximately 20 miles from Sidney,
Nebraska. When WW2 started the installation provided hundreds of
earthen bomb storage bunkers dotting the prairie, in addition to a
vast complex of warehouses that were used throughout WW2, Korea and
Vietnam. In 1967, most of the complex was turned over to area
farmers/ranchers and a community college (where I received my A&P
mechanic certificate in 1983).

-Mike Marron





  #7  
Old July 30th 03, 10:52 AM
Cub Driver
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Default


When the local weekly newspaper "Algona Upper Des Moines" elicited WWII
veterans' stories a couple of years ago, it was inundated with the
stories from German POW's who had returned to live in the Algona
(Kossuth Co.) Iowa area after repatriation back to Germany.


I wonder how many American and British Commonwealth troops went to
live postwar in the vicinity of the camps where they'd lived as guests
of the German and Japanese governments?

The best book I've read on this subject is Prisoners of the Japanese,
by Gavan Daws www.danford.net/daws.htm


all the best -- Dan Ford
email: www.danford.net/letters.htm#9

see the Warbird's Forum at http://www.danford.net/index.htm
Vietnam | Flying Tigers | Pacific War | Brewster Buffalo | Piper Cub
  #8  
Old July 30th 03, 11:13 AM
John Keeney
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Posts: n/a
Default


John Burson wrote in message
...
Thirty POW camps were built in 1942 to house the onslaught of captured

enemy
soldiers. McClellan's POW camp was completed in 1943. By mid-1944,

German
POWs had become a significant part of the labor pool at Fort McClellan.

In
their off hours and in jobs assigned to them on post, POWs created a
substantial legacy at Fort McClellan in masonry and art as well as more
invisible improvements. Two hundred prisoners were detailed daily for
excavation, drainage, and clearing operations on the main post; 170 were
involved with food preparation; and others worked on vehicles on post.

POW
labor is responsible for numerous examples of stonework on Fort McClellan,
including stone walls, chimneys, a patio built behind the old Recreation
Center, drainage ditches, and landscaping. The carved bar at the

Officer's
Club (Remington Hall) and the exceptional murals which dress the club's

wall
are also credited to POWs. The camp at Fort McClellan not only acted as

the
processing center for all prisoners interned in the Alabama camps, but was
the last camp to be deactivated on April


A quick web search turned up a list of major camps at
http://uboat.net/men/pow/pow_in_america_stats.htm
(the list is long and tacked on at the bottom); the site also
has a monthly census of prisoners in the system and list
a peak of over 425,000 prisioners. Japanese never accounting
for as much as 2% of the population after April '43..

I've read of German PWs being dropped off around California
during Orange season to pick the fruit of indivual trees in
peoples' yards. Later in the day, the truck would come back for'm,
no guards, no escapes.
I don't know if such low security was common.

wrote in message
...
David Lesher wrote:


German POW's held in the US. I recall reading the Army shipped most
into the Midwest. (I know there was one camp in Sandusky OH area.)


Reportedly a German POW camp located near the massive U.S.
Army Sioux Ordinance Depot approximately 20 miles from Sidney,
Nebraska. When WW2 started the installation provided hundreds of
earthen bomb storage bunkers dotting the prairie, in addition to a
vast complex of warehouses that were used throughout WW2, Korea and
Vietnam. In 1967, most of the complex was turned over to area
farmers/ranchers and a community college (where I received my A&P
mechanic certificate in 1983).

-Mike Marron


Camp Algoma, Iowa
Camp Aliceville, Alabama
Camp Alva, Oklahoma
Camp Angel Island, California
Camp Ashby, Virginia
Camp Ashford, West Virginia
Camp Atlanta, Nebraska
Camp Atterbury, Indiana
Camp Barkeley, Texas
Camp Beale, California
Camp Blanding, Florida
Camp Bowie, Texas
Camp Brady, Texas
Camp Breckinridge, Kentucky
Camp Butner, North Carolina
Camp Campbell, Kentucky
Camp Carson, Colorado
Camp Chaffee, Arkansas
Camp Claiborne, Louisiana
Camp Clarinda, Iowa
Camp Clark, Missouri
Camp Clinton, Mississippi
Camp Como, Mississippi
Camp Concordia, Kansas
Camp Cooke, California
Camp Croft, South Carolina
Camp Crossville, Tennessee
Camp Crowder, Missouri
Camp David, Maryland
Camp Dermott, Arkansas
Camp Douglas, Wyoming
Camp Edwards, Massachusetts
Camp Ellis, Illinois
Camp Evelyn, Michigan
Camp Fannin, Texas
Camp Farragut, Idaho
Camp Florence, Arizona
Camp Forrest, Tennessee
Camp Gordon Johnston, Florida
Camp Grant, Illinois
Camp Gruber, Oklahoma
Camp Hale, Colorado
Camp Hearne, Texas
Camp Hood, Texas
Camp Houlton, Maine
Camp Howze, Texas
Camp Hulen, Texas
Camp Huntsville, Texas
Camp Indianola, Nebraska
Camp Jerome, Arkansas
Camp Lee, Virginia
Camp Livingston, Louisiana
Camp Lordsburg, New Mexico
Camp McAlester, Oklahoma
Camp McCain, Mississippi
Camp McCoy, Wisconsin
Camp McLean, Texas
Camp Mackall, North Carolina
Camp Maxey, Texas
Camp Mexia, Texas
Camp Monticello, Arkansas
Camp New Cumberland, Pennsylvania
Camp Ogden, Utah
Camp Opelika, Alabama
Camp Papago Park, Arizona
Camp Peary, Virginia
Camp Perry, Ohio
Camp Phillips, Kansas
Camp Pickett, Virginia
Camp Pima, Arizona
Camp Polk, Lousiana
Camp Popolopen, New York
Camp Pryor, Oklahoma
Camp Reynolds, Pennsylvania
Camp Jos. T. Robinson, Arkansas
Camp Roswell, New Mexico
Camp Rucker, Alabama
Camp Rupert, Idaho
Camp Ruston, Louisiana
Camp Scottsbluff, Nebraska
Camp Shelby, Mississippi
Camp Sibert, Alabama
Camp Somerset, Maryland
Camp Stewart, Georgia
Camp Stockton, California
Camp Sutton, North Carolina
Camp Swift, Texas
Camp Tonkawa, Oklahoma
Camp Trinidad, Colorado
Camp Van Dorn, Mississippi
Camp Wallace, Texas
Camp Wheeler, Georgia
Camp White, Oregon
Camp Wolters, Texas
Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana
Fort Benning, Georgia
Fort Bliss, Texas
Fort Bragg, North Carolina
Fort Crockett, Texas
Fort Curtis, Virginia
Fort Custer, Michigan
Fort Devens, Massachusetts
Fort Dix, New Jersey
Fort DuPont, Delaware
Fort Eustis, Virginia
Fort Gordon, Georgia
Fort Greely, Colorado
Fort Jackson, South Carolina
Fort Kearny, Rhode Island
Fort Knox, Kentucky
Fort Leavenworth, Kansas
Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri
Fort Lewis, Washington
Fort McClellan, Alabama
Fort Meade, Maryland
Fort Niagara, New York
Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia
Fort Ord, California
Fort Patrick Henry, Virginia
Fort Reno, Oklahoma
Fort Riley, Kansas
Fort Robinson, Nebraska
Fort D. A. Russell, Texas
Fort Sam Houston, Texas
Fort Sheridan, Illinois
Fort Sill, Oklahoma
Fort F. E. Warren, Wyoming

Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland
Eglin Army Air Field, Florida
Glennan General Hospital, Oklahoma
Halloran General Hospital, New York
Hampton Roads Port of Embarkation, Virginia
Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pennsylvania
Holabird Signal Depot, Maryland
McCloskey General Hospital, Texas
Memphis General Depot, Tennessee
New Orleans Port of Embarkation, Louisiana
Olmsted Field, Pennsylvania
Pine Bluff Arsenal, Arkansas
Richmond ASF Depot, Virginia
Tobyhanna Military Reservation, Pennsylvania
Westover Field, Massachusetts



  #9  
Old July 30th 03, 11:13 AM
John Keeney
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


John Burson wrote in message
...
Thirty POW camps were built in 1942 to house the onslaught of captured

enemy
soldiers. McClellan's POW camp was completed in 1943. By mid-1944,

German
POWs had become a significant part of the labor pool at Fort McClellan.

In
their off hours and in jobs assigned to them on post, POWs created a
substantial legacy at Fort McClellan in masonry and art as well as more
invisible improvements. Two hundred prisoners were detailed daily for
excavation, drainage, and clearing operations on the main post; 170 were
involved with food preparation; and others worked on vehicles on post.

POW
labor is responsible for numerous examples of stonework on Fort McClellan,
including stone walls, chimneys, a patio built behind the old Recreation
Center, drainage ditches, and landscaping. The carved bar at the

Officer's
Club (Remington Hall) and the exceptional murals which dress the club's

wall
are also credited to POWs. The camp at Fort McClellan not only acted as

the
processing center for all prisoners interned in the Alabama camps, but was
the last camp to be deactivated on April


A quick web search turned up a list of major camps at
http://uboat.net/men/pow/pow_in_america_stats.htm
(the list is long and tacked on at the bottom); the site also
has a monthly census of prisoners in the system and list
a peak of over 425,000 prisioners. Japanese never accounting
for as much as 2% of the population after April '43..

I've read of German PWs being dropped off around California
during Orange season to pick the fruit of indivual trees in
peoples' yards. Later in the day, the truck would come back for'm,
no guards, no escapes.
I don't know if such low security was common.

wrote in message
...
David Lesher wrote:


German POW's held in the US. I recall reading the Army shipped most
into the Midwest. (I know there was one camp in Sandusky OH area.)


Reportedly a German POW camp located near the massive U.S.
Army Sioux Ordinance Depot approximately 20 miles from Sidney,
Nebraska. When WW2 started the installation provided hundreds of
earthen bomb storage bunkers dotting the prairie, in addition to a
vast complex of warehouses that were used throughout WW2, Korea and
Vietnam. In 1967, most of the complex was turned over to area
farmers/ranchers and a community college (where I received my A&P
mechanic certificate in 1983).

-Mike Marron


Camp Algoma, Iowa
Camp Aliceville, Alabama
Camp Alva, Oklahoma
Camp Angel Island, California
Camp Ashby, Virginia
Camp Ashford, West Virginia
Camp Atlanta, Nebraska
Camp Atterbury, Indiana
Camp Barkeley, Texas
Camp Beale, California
Camp Blanding, Florida
Camp Bowie, Texas
Camp Brady, Texas
Camp Breckinridge, Kentucky
Camp Butner, North Carolina
Camp Campbell, Kentucky
Camp Carson, Colorado
Camp Chaffee, Arkansas
Camp Claiborne, Louisiana
Camp Clarinda, Iowa
Camp Clark, Missouri
Camp Clinton, Mississippi
Camp Como, Mississippi
Camp Concordia, Kansas
Camp Cooke, California
Camp Croft, South Carolina
Camp Crossville, Tennessee
Camp Crowder, Missouri
Camp David, Maryland
Camp Dermott, Arkansas
Camp Douglas, Wyoming
Camp Edwards, Massachusetts
Camp Ellis, Illinois
Camp Evelyn, Michigan
Camp Fannin, Texas
Camp Farragut, Idaho
Camp Florence, Arizona
Camp Forrest, Tennessee
Camp Gordon Johnston, Florida
Camp Grant, Illinois
Camp Gruber, Oklahoma
Camp Hale, Colorado
Camp Hearne, Texas
Camp Hood, Texas
Camp Houlton, Maine
Camp Howze, Texas
Camp Hulen, Texas
Camp Huntsville, Texas
Camp Indianola, Nebraska
Camp Jerome, Arkansas
Camp Lee, Virginia
Camp Livingston, Louisiana
Camp Lordsburg, New Mexico
Camp McAlester, Oklahoma
Camp McCain, Mississippi
Camp McCoy, Wisconsin
Camp McLean, Texas
Camp Mackall, North Carolina
Camp Maxey, Texas
Camp Mexia, Texas
Camp Monticello, Arkansas
Camp New Cumberland, Pennsylvania
Camp Ogden, Utah
Camp Opelika, Alabama
Camp Papago Park, Arizona
Camp Peary, Virginia
Camp Perry, Ohio
Camp Phillips, Kansas
Camp Pickett, Virginia
Camp Pima, Arizona
Camp Polk, Lousiana
Camp Popolopen, New York
Camp Pryor, Oklahoma
Camp Reynolds, Pennsylvania
Camp Jos. T. Robinson, Arkansas
Camp Roswell, New Mexico
Camp Rucker, Alabama
Camp Rupert, Idaho
Camp Ruston, Louisiana
Camp Scottsbluff, Nebraska
Camp Shelby, Mississippi
Camp Sibert, Alabama
Camp Somerset, Maryland
Camp Stewart, Georgia
Camp Stockton, California
Camp Sutton, North Carolina
Camp Swift, Texas
Camp Tonkawa, Oklahoma
Camp Trinidad, Colorado
Camp Van Dorn, Mississippi
Camp Wallace, Texas
Camp Wheeler, Georgia
Camp White, Oregon
Camp Wolters, Texas
Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana
Fort Benning, Georgia
Fort Bliss, Texas
Fort Bragg, North Carolina
Fort Crockett, Texas
Fort Curtis, Virginia
Fort Custer, Michigan
Fort Devens, Massachusetts
Fort Dix, New Jersey
Fort DuPont, Delaware
Fort Eustis, Virginia
Fort Gordon, Georgia
Fort Greely, Colorado
Fort Jackson, South Carolina
Fort Kearny, Rhode Island
Fort Knox, Kentucky
Fort Leavenworth, Kansas
Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri
Fort Lewis, Washington
Fort McClellan, Alabama
Fort Meade, Maryland
Fort Niagara, New York
Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia
Fort Ord, California
Fort Patrick Henry, Virginia
Fort Reno, Oklahoma
Fort Riley, Kansas
Fort Robinson, Nebraska
Fort D. A. Russell, Texas
Fort Sam Houston, Texas
Fort Sheridan, Illinois
Fort Sill, Oklahoma
Fort F. E. Warren, Wyoming

Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland
Eglin Army Air Field, Florida
Glennan General Hospital, Oklahoma
Halloran General Hospital, New York
Hampton Roads Port of Embarkation, Virginia
Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pennsylvania
Holabird Signal Depot, Maryland
McCloskey General Hospital, Texas
Memphis General Depot, Tennessee
New Orleans Port of Embarkation, Louisiana
Olmsted Field, Pennsylvania
Pine Bluff Arsenal, Arkansas
Richmond ASF Depot, Virginia
Tobyhanna Military Reservation, Pennsylvania
Westover Field, Massachusetts



  #10  
Old July 30th 03, 03:16 PM
Keith Willshaw
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Posts: n/a
Default


"John Keeney" wrote in message
...



I've read of German PWs being dropped off around California
during Orange season to pick the fruit of indivual trees in
peoples' yards. Later in the day, the truck would come back for'm,
no guards, no escapes.
I don't know if such low security was common.


It was pretty normal for Italian POW's in the UK

There was a 'POW camp' in the village where I live, in Cambridgeshire
which consisted of a shed where the prisoners would report to the
'guard' which was one corporal and a private of the home guard before
being allocated work. They were all billeted with local families and worked
on the area farms. The only 'escape' was after the war when 3 disappeared
to avoid being sent home.

Keith


 




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