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FCC License?



 
 
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  #11  
Old January 1st 11, 12:45 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
John Gilbert[_2_]
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Posts: 10
Default FCC License?

I can show an example that makes this incorrect. Our club had a
license that allowed ground support stations to use either 123.3 or
123.5. Also, 87.323 says explicitly "Aviation support mobile stations
will be assigned 123.300 and 123.500 MHz". "And", not "or". Perhaps
you can pay a fee to get them to correct your license?? That's
crazy...


On Dec 31, 6:04*am, Tony V wrote:
2KA wrote:
You can get a license for a mobile ground station (in support of
glider operations) to transmit on a single frequency, i.e. 123.3. *I
have one. *You need a second license if you want to transmit on
123.5. *Such mobile ground stations are not allowed, however, to
transmit on the CTAF.


Crazy, isn't it? Hand held air band transceivers have been around for a
long time but it is only recently that they've become "dirt cheap" and
everybody and his brother has one. Case in point - in 1985 I paid almost
US$500 for an Icom A20. Today, I earn 3 times as much as I did in '85
and I got an A6 for well under US$300.

I suspect that the current communications regs are simply a reflection
of the earlier era - at least, I hope so.The reality is that if you
briefly and occasionally use a hand held outside of an aircraft, the
feds will not come after you - not that I recommend illegal use, mind
you. If you repeatedly mis-use a base station, chances are that they
will -http://www.fcc.gov/eb/Orders/2004/DA-04-3498A1.html,http://www.fcc.gov/eb/Orders/2009/DA-09-1258A1.html.

Tony, LS6-b "6N", W1DYS


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  #12  
Old January 1st 11, 03:46 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
2KA
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Posts: 225
Default FCC License?

When I got my support license, I called to ask specifically about
using 123.5 as well. You are correct that such an option is
available, but it costs twice as much. You have to fill out two
license applications. But at the end you're right -- they give you a
single ground station ID and allow you to transmit on either.

Lynn
"2KA"

  #13  
Old January 3rd 11, 01:47 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
JFP
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Posts: 1
Default FCC License?

On Dec 30 2010, 5:48*pm, wrote:
On Dec 30, 6:38*pm, Mike Schumann
wrote:





On 12/29/2010 6:20 PM, ContestID67 wrote:


Maybe this has come up before, if so I appologize. *I know that we
have had a thread on the need for an airport to have an FCC license.
This came up when one of the gliderports was fined for having an
expired license. *This was useful, and timely, information for other
glider ports.


So there are now two followup questions;


- Does an FCC license for your airport cover the use of handhelds for
ground operations such as talking to the winch operator, the wing
runner to the guy logging flights on the "board", telling the guy on
the mower that someone is landing, etc? *I would think that if the
communications are operationally necessary, the answer is no a license
is not required.


- Is an FCC license needed by myself when I am flying my glider? *I
have been told no, but heard some conflicting information which was
more related to corporate pilots.


Can someone quote chapter and verse?


Thanks, John


This is an area where the SSA could be very helpful. *The current FCC
rules, the way I understand them, exempts radios that are used in
aircraft (permanently installed and portables) from requiring a license..
* All other radios need to be licensed.


One problem is that the license system for ground based aeronautical
radios assumes that the radio is going to be used at a single location,
so that the license specifies a particular frequency to be used (usually
the CATF frequency).


There doesn't seem to be any provision for licensing a portable radio
for use by a retrieve crew, where the crew would alternately use 123.3
or whatever local CATF frequency is appropriate for a remote airport
that the glider may be landing at.


There seems to be a mechanism in the FCC rules to get radios licensed
that don't fit into the standard FCC regulatory framework. *The SSA
should take advantage of this to get a blanket license for all SSA
members using ground based radios.


Not only would that solve a legal black hole that probably affects the
majority of glider pilots at some point or other, but it would also
provide a powerful incentive for people to become SSA members, so they
can be covered by the blanket license.


--
Mike Schumann- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


I'm not aware of someone in the SSA structure that is well versed in
this. Perhaps you could volunteer your
expertise. Steve Northcraft and Cindy Brickner do a lot on the FAA
side and no doubt would be happy for help
on something like this.
Happy New Year
UH- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Perhaps the SSA could invite the FCC to the Philly meeting to present
on this subject. Probably pack the room, judging from the thread
here.

JFP
  #14  
Old March 7th 21, 07:09 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
John DeRosa OHM Ω http://aviation.derosaweb.net
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Posts: 264
Default FCC License?

I'm circling back on this old 2010 thread as I received a letter from the FCC asking me to renew the radio license specific specific to my N number (aka "Call Sign").

So here is a question that really needs a simple yes/no answer*.

"Do I need an FCC license for my glider (or for that matter for the myriad of GA power pilots flying their airplanes owned or rented) while flying WITHIN THE US so I can transmit across the entire aviation frequency range (118-137 MHz) and I can communicate with other pilots, small/large airports, ATC, etc, etc?"

I believe that the answer is "No". See the reference links below.

https://www.fcc.gov/commercial-radio...icense-program
https://www.aopa.org/travel/internat...r-certificates
https://sportysacademy.com/fcc/
https://cfiacademy.com/how-to-get-fc...rivate-pilots/

Let the conversation begin.

Thanks, John (OHM)

*PS - I'm *NOT* talking about a license for my gliderport, international flying, drug running, insurrection, or (for Bruno's benefit) flying in an air show.
  #15  
Old March 8th 21, 12:41 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Dan Marotta
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Posts: 4,550
Default FCC License?

No. Used to, not any more unless you cross a border. If you plan any
international flights, check first.

Dan
5J

On 3/7/21 12:09 PM, John DeRosa OHM Ω http://aviation.derosaweb.net wrote:
I'm circling back on this old 2010 thread as I received a letter from the FCC asking me to renew the radio license specific specific to my N number (aka "Call Sign").

So here is a question that really needs a simple yes/no answer*.

"Do I need an FCC license for my glider (or for that matter for the myriad of GA power pilots flying their airplanes owned or rented) while flying WITHIN THE US so I can transmit across the entire aviation frequency range (118-137 MHz) and I can communicate with other pilots, small/large airports, ATC, etc, etc?"

I believe that the answer is "No". See the reference links below.

https://www.fcc.gov/commercial-radio...icense-program
https://www.aopa.org/travel/internat...r-certificates
https://sportysacademy.com/fcc/
https://cfiacademy.com/how-to-get-fc...rivate-pilots/

Let the conversation begin.

Thanks, John (OHM)

*PS - I'm *NOT* talking about a license for my gliderport, international flying, drug running, insurrection, or (for Bruno's benefit) flying in an air show.

  #16  
Old March 9th 21, 04:06 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Peter Hudson
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Posts: 2
Default FCC License?

On Sunday, March 7, 2021 at 4:41:35 PM UTC-8, Dan Marotta wrote:
No. Used to, not any more unless you cross a border. If you plan any
international flights, check first.

Dan
5J
On 3/7/21 12:09 PM, John DeRosa OHM Ω http://aviation.derosaweb.net wrote:
I'm circling back on this old 2010 thread as I received a letter from the FCC asking me to renew the radio license specific specific to my N number (aka "Call Sign").

So here is a question that really needs a simple yes/no answer*.

"Do I need an FCC license for my glider (or for that matter for the myriad of GA power pilots flying their airplanes owned or rented) while flying WITHIN THE US so I can transmit across the entire aviation frequency range (118-137 MHz) and I can communicate with other pilots, small/large airports, ATC, etc, etc?"

I believe that the answer is "No". See the reference links below.

https://www.fcc.gov/commercial-radio...icense-program
https://www.aopa.org/travel/internat...r-certificates
https://sportysacademy.com/fcc/
https://cfiacademy.com/how-to-get-fc...rivate-pilots/

Let the conversation begin.

Thanks, John (OHM)

*PS - I'm *NOT* talking about a license for my gliderport, international flying, drug running, insurrection, or (for Bruno's benefit) flying in an air show.

On a related note: I did a lot of emailing with the FCC a few years back about using aviation radios from aircraft without N numbers (ultralights, paramotors, paragliders etc.) And the end result was that to be legal I needed a restricted radio telephone operators permit. the same as if flying a registered plane out of country. The popular answer is "no one checks, so I do it for safety" but I figured for $60 and no training requirements for a lifetime permit I would just do sign up for it.
  #17  
Old March 9th 21, 05:32 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
John DeRosa OHM Ω http://aviation.derosaweb.net
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Posts: 264
Default FCC License?

I'm unsure if the license is good for your lifetime. I thought all FCC licenses had to be renewed every 10 years. Is a "permit" different than a "license"?
  #18  
Old March 9th 21, 06:00 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Dan Daly[_2_]
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Posts: 703
Default FCC License?

On Sunday, March 7, 2021 at 7:41:35 PM UTC-5, Dan Marotta wrote:
No. Used to, not any more unless you cross a border. If you plan any
international flights, check first.

Dan
5J
On 3/7/21 12:09 PM, John DeRosa OHM Ω http://aviation.derosaweb.net wrote:
I'm circling back on this old 2010 thread as I received a letter from the FCC asking me to renew the radio license specific specific to my N number (aka "Call Sign").

So here is a question that really needs a simple yes/no answer*.

"Do I need an FCC license for my glider (or for that matter for the myriad of GA power pilots flying their airplanes owned or rented) while flying WITHIN THE US so I can transmit across the entire aviation frequency range (118-137 MHz) and I can communicate with other pilots, small/large airports, ATC, etc, etc?"


Just to compare to Canada, it's much the same up here. From the regulator's website:
" Do I need a licence for the aeronautical radio equipment on board my aircraft?
You will not require a licence if you meet both of the following criteria:
- the aircraft is not operated in the sovereign airspace of a country other than Canada.
- the radio equipment on board the aircraft is only capable of operating on frequencies that are allocated for aeronautical mobile communications or aeronautical radio navigation."

So neither we nor you need a licence unless we cross the border, when each of us then do... Perhaps a mutual exception might be arranged.

We also have a medical declaration for the glider pilot licence, but it's not valid in the U.S.; yours, not valid up here. Pity.

Dan
  #19  
Old March 9th 21, 09:08 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Dan Marotta
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Posts: 4,550
Default FCC License?

I thought the Radio Telephone Operator's license I got back in 1974 (at
no charge, I might add), was a lifetime license. I lost it somewhere
along the way. If I decide to fly the Caribbean or Canada, I'll check
into getting another one.

Dan
5J

On 3/9/21 10:32 AM, John DeRosa OHM Ω http://aviation.derosaweb.net wrote:
I'm unsure if the license is good for your lifetime. I thought all FCC licenses had to be renewed every 10 years. Is a "permit" different than a "license"?

  #20  
Old March 9th 21, 09:11 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Peter Hudson
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Posts: 2
Default FCC License?

On Tuesday, March 9, 2021 at 9:32:45 AM UTC-8, John DeRosa OHM Ω http://aviation.derosaweb.net wrote:
I'm unsure if the license is good for your lifetime. I thought all FCC licenses had to be renewed every 10 years. Is a "permit" different than a "license"?

I have a HAM and GFRS license that does need to be renewed every 10 years but the restricted radio operator's permit is a lifetime thing...I couldn't say why, but at least I can't forget to renew it!

When I go into the ULS FCC database and list my licenses, it's the only one that doesn't show an expiration date.
 




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