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pre-oilers



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 9th 06, 11:39 PM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default pre-oilers

Does anyone use a pre-oiler for their aircraft?

Any cherokee owners want to pass along good/bad experiences
with pre-oilers?

Thanks

--
Bob Noel
New NHL? what a joke

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  #2  
Old January 10th 06, 12:16 AM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default pre-oilers

Bob Noel wrote:

Does anyone use a pre-oiler for their aircraft?

Any cherokee owners want to pass along good/bad experiences
with pre-oilers?

Thanks


Does a pre-oiler oil the cam lobes? I suspect not, unless you have oil
passages drilled in the cam to oil the lobes (I think it is RAM aircraft
that has an STC for adding oil ports to the cams for direct rather than
indirect oiling of the cam lobes). So, I'm curious as to whether a
pre-oiler does much good seeing how it is usually the cams and pistons
that see the greatest start-up wear, and these both depend on splash for
the lubrication?
  #3  
Old January 10th 06, 02:15 AM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default pre-oilers

On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 18:16:15 -0500, Ray Andraka
wrote:

snip
Does a pre-oiler oil the cam lobes? I suspect not, unless you have oil
passages drilled in the cam to oil the lobes (I think it is RAM aircraft
that has an STC for adding oil ports to the cams for direct rather than
indirect oiling of the cam lobes). So, I'm curious as to whether a
pre-oiler does much good seeing how it is usually the cams and pistons
that see the greatest start-up wear, and these both depend on splash for
the lubrication?


methinks the "splash" is going to occur sooner after the start if the
engine is pressure pre-oiled.

TC
  #4  
Old January 10th 06, 04:49 AM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default pre-oilers

Click here for Lyc cam oiling!

http://www.chuckneyent.com/neynozzle.html

Karl
"Curator" N185KG

  #6  
Old January 10th 06, 07:24 AM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default pre-oilers

The "splash" does NOT come from the rod ends going through the oil in
the pan. If the oil level is that high the oil temperature is going
to be real high with the pressure too low due to the oil foaming.
The cam lobes are oiled from the oil that is THROWN from the rod
bearings and the crank bearings, Pre oiling just gets more oil there
sooner.
John

On Tue, 10 Jan 2006 05:30:47 GMT, George Patterson
wrote:

wrote:

methinks the "splash" is going to occur sooner after the start if the
engine is pressure pre-oiled.


Why? The "splash" comes from the crank counterweights and rod ends going through
the oil in the sump. A pre-oiler pulls oil from the sump and moves it through
the passages to make sure the journals and bearings are lubricated at start.
Seems to me that the "splash" will happen just as fast either way.

George Patterson
Coffee is only a way of stealing time that should by rights belong to
your slightly older self.


  #7  
Old January 10th 06, 03:26 PM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default pre-oilers

George Patterson writes:

wrote:


methinks the "splash" is going to occur sooner after the start if the
engine is pressure pre-oiled.


Why? The "splash" comes from the crank counterweights and rod ends going through
the oil in the sump. A pre-oiler pulls oil from the sump and moves it through
the passages to make sure the journals and bearings are lubricated at start.
Seems to me that the "splash" will happen just as fast either way.


Someone speculated about a compressed air probe inserted into
dispstick that would spray the oil around. I found that an interesting
idea, one with a host of potential problems. But if it could "fog"
the lower end before cranking......

--
A host is a host from coast to
& no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
  #8  
Old January 10th 06, 05:29 PM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default pre-oilers

John_F wrote:

The cam lobes are oiled from the oil that is THROWN from the rod
bearings and the crank bearings, Pre oiling just gets more oil there
sooner.


Got it. Thanks.

George Patterson
Coffee is only a way of stealing time that should by rights belong to
your slightly older self.
  #9  
Old January 10th 06, 09:36 PM posted to rec.aviation.owning
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Default pre-oilers

My experience is that pre-oilers are a rarity on GA aircraft... More
seen on high end yachts, exotic race motors, large commercial engines
on cargo ships, engine tinkerers, etc...

The real issue is do you need one? If you fly the airplane on a weekly
basis, then the parts will still be oily and oil pressure will come up
quickly upon starting..

--- BTW, your oil pressure gauge is not a good indicator of how fast
the oil galleys start flowing oil when you start the engine... I could
rattle on for paragraphs (as usual) on this, but just be aware that it
is slow to register pressure with cold oil for several reasons ---

If the airplane sits for weeks at times, then you need to look at the
pre-oil issues... Actually, the suggestion of using compressed air to
splatter oil up on the cam, rods, cylinders, is a workable solution...
It is the cam/lifter that suffers the most from dry starts - not that
being dry is good for pistons, mains, etc...
The biggest barrier to a pre-oiler in GA aircraft is weight, cost, and
certification issues... Actually, as I am typing this a workable idea
came to me that would be portable device and not require an STC...
Probably a market out there for a device that is under $200... I'm up
to my eyeballs in starting another business right now (and my wife is
ready to choke me) so I don't have the time or energy to follow this
up...

The reality is that rust is the crime against an engine... Training
fleet engines that run every day routinely go beyond TBOH... As do
pipeline patrol airplanes, cancelled check haulers, etc..

denny

 




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