A aviation & planes forum. AviationBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » AviationBanter forum » rec.aviation newsgroups » Piloting
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Digital Photos (was: Reno Suite...)



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old December 12th 04, 06:55 PM
RST Engineering
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Digital Photos (was: Reno Suite...)

There was a comment on the "was" thread about .jpg being an inferior format
to a couple of other formats. So if my Kodak 1.3Mp camera only downloads in
..jpg, how do I fool it into downloading in some other uncompressed format?

According to the camera specifications, the actual file format is listed as:
"Exif version 2.1 (JPEG base).

Suggestions other than borrowing Gail's very expensive Canon for my magazine
shots?

Jim


  #2  
Old December 12th 04, 07:07 PM
BTIZ
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

if your digital camera downloads to jpg.. as does mine.. the only way to
convert it is after download using a photo editing program that supports
multiple formats.. I use Paint Shop Pro

BT

"RST Engineering" wrote in message
...
There was a comment on the "was" thread about .jpg being an inferior
format to a couple of other formats. So if my Kodak 1.3Mp camera only
downloads in .jpg, how do I fool it into downloading in some other
uncompressed format?

According to the camera specifications, the actual file format is listed
as: "Exif version 2.1 (JPEG base).

Suggestions other than borrowing Gail's very expensive Canon for my
magazine shots?

Jim



  #3  
Old December 12th 04, 07:13 PM
G.R. Patterson III
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



RST Engineering wrote:

There was a comment on the "was" thread about .jpg being an inferior format
to a couple of other formats. So if my Kodak 1.3Mp camera only downloads in
.jpg, how do I fool it into downloading in some other uncompressed format?


Jpeg is the preferred format for photos that are going to be displayed for view
(for example, the shots we submit to Jay of our aircraft should be jpegs). Gifs
are preferred for shots that people are likly to just glance at (for example,
thumbnails) because they typically are smaller than jpegs and consequently load
faster. This is not always the case, however; typically, the busier the photo
is, the less advantage gif has over jpeg, and a gif of a complicated color photo
may be larger than a jpeg of the same shot.

The main problem you will have is that, once you have a photo in a compressed
format, any attempt to edit it will reduce the quality of the shot and almost
certainly drastically increase its size. If you're shooting for a web site,
download your file from the camera the size and quality you want and never touch
it again.

Many digital cameras will download in a "raw" format. Unfortunately, many of
these formats are proprietary to the camera manufacturer and you have to use
their software to manipulate it. The "bmp" format is pretty universal and can be
easily edited by most photo programs.

George Patterson
The desire for safety stands against every great and noble enterprise.
  #4  
Old December 12th 04, 07:40 PM
Peter Duniho
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"RST Engineering" wrote in message
...
There was a comment on the "was" thread about .jpg being an inferior
format to a couple of other formats. So if my Kodak 1.3Mp camera only
downloads in .jpg, how do I fool it into downloading in some other
uncompressed format?


Depends on the camera. But I wouldn't be surprised if a 1.3Mp camera simply
does not provide any other format. Kodak's original digital cameras had a
proprietary format option, but it was compressed as well, and any
proprietary format requires conversion software to change the data into
something you can actually use. (EXIF is simply a header format used with
JPEG images to allow the camera to store information about how the picture
was taken...it's not an image format itself).

For a consumer-grade camera, as long as you set the JPEG format to the
highest resolution, lowest-compression setting, you should fine. You'd be
unlikely to notice any difference between the raw image and the compressed
one. Any of the professional-grade digital SLRs should have an option for
saving the data in a "raw" format (which typically is actually just a
proprietary, non-lossy compressed format). One of Canon's higher-end models
actually can have two memory cards installed and allows you to save each
picture twice, JPEG to one memory card and their raw format in the other.

All that said, you don't seem to have correctly understood the comments in
the other thread. JPEG is NOT an inferior format for photographs. It's
designed to remove information (enhancing compressability), without
sacrificing what the human eye sees. At higher compression levels, it
certainly can look like crap, but at the low compression levels used by
digital cameras, it's just fine for most people and most purposes.

The comparison you read was specifically looking at computer-generated
line-art images, which JPEG compression can make unreadable, especially at
the higher compression settings. But that doesn't mean JPEG is inherently a
bad format. It just means that you can achieve similar compression ratios
without sacrificing quality by using a non-lossy format like GIF or PNG
(computer generated images have more "regular" data, and so compress better
without throwing away information...they are "information sparse" in the
first place).

Suggestions other than borrowing Gail's very expensive Canon for my
magazine shots?


Well, 1.8Mp sure sucks for publication, but it wouldn't take a high-priced
camera to fix that. There are several good 5Mp cameras on the market,
priced at $500 and lower, that would do a great job. They emit JPEG images
too, but they will be high enough resolution, and low enough compression
that they should reprint just fine.

Pete




According to the camera specifications, the actual file format is listed
as: "Exif version 2.1 (JPEG base).


Jim



  #5  
Old December 12th 04, 09:13 PM
C J Campbell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"RST Engineering" wrote in message
...
There was a comment on the "was" thread about .jpg being an inferior

format
to a couple of other formats. So if my Kodak 1.3Mp camera only downloads

in
.jpg, how do I fool it into downloading in some other uncompressed format?

According to the camera specifications, the actual file format is listed

as:
"Exif version 2.1 (JPEG base).

Suggestions other than borrowing Gail's very expensive Canon for my

magazine
shots?


JPEG is indeed inferior to some other formats. Furthermore, every time you
manipulate the photo, changing color balance, sharpness, exposure, etc., it
loses more information. Many programs will lose information opening the .jpg
and saving it again without any other changes. All this loss of information
shows up in loss of fine detail, especially in the highlights and shadows,
and in color range. The way professional photographers who shoot in JPEG get
around this is they keep the original file and work only with copies of it,
making as many changes as they can and then saving the finished product.

JPEG actually has many advantages over the other formats, including file
size, which makes it much easier to transmit to the publisher, so most
professional photographers, especially sports photographers, use JPEG. The
faster camera action gained from using JPEG makes it worth the small loss of
information. There is a big difference between shooting a burst of maybe
five frames in RAW, then having to wait 10 to 15 seconds while the camera
saves it to memory, and being able to shoot continuously at 12 frames per
second in JPEG.

More cameras allow shooting in both RAW and JPEG at the same time. My Nikon
D70 can do this, although it does slow down how fast I can take pictures
because it now has to save two files instead of one. The advantage is
getting to use the JPEG files for printing contact sheets and preview
photos, while keeping the versatility of RAW.

One thing to remember is that photos in most publications are really not
blown up all that much, so the loss of detail caused by JPEG file
compression is not readily apparent to the untrained eye.

Even so, your Kodak 1.3Mp is wholly inadequate for any form of publication.
You will need at least 4.0Mp to achieve high enough resolution for print.
Such cameras are reasonably priced and easy to find. You can find camera
reviews on www.dpreview.com.

The common formats used by digital cameras are JPEG, TIFF, and RAW. JPEG and
TIFF are pretty well standardized. RAW is proprietary to each camera
manufacturer, although Adobe is pushing a RAW format of its own to become
the new standard. GIF files are obsolete.


  #6  
Old December 12th 04, 09:14 PM
C J Campbell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Peter Duniho" wrote in message
...

For a consumer-grade camera, as long as you set the JPEG format to the
highest resolution, lowest-compression setting, you should fine. You'd be
unlikely to notice any difference between the raw image and the compressed
one. Any of the professional-grade digital SLRs should have an option for
saving the data in a "raw" format (which typically is actually just a
proprietary, non-lossy compressed format). One of Canon's higher-end

models
actually can have two memory cards installed and allows you to save each
picture twice, JPEG to one memory card and their raw format in the other.


Several cameras do that. My Nikon D70 even does that and it saves both files
to the same card.


  #7  
Old December 12th 04, 09:15 PM
C J Campbell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Peter Duniho" wrote in message
...

For a consumer-grade camera, as long as you set the JPEG format to the
highest resolution, lowest-compression setting, you should fine. You'd be
unlikely to notice any difference between the raw image and the compressed
one. Any of the professional-grade digital SLRs should have an option for
saving the data in a "raw" format (which typically is actually just a
proprietary, non-lossy compressed format).


Actually, most RAW files are compressed somewhat, too. Read the instruction
manual.


  #8  
Old December 12th 04, 09:16 PM
Ben Jackson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
RST Engineering wrote:
There was a comment on the "was" thread about .jpg being an inferior format
to a couple of other formats. So if my Kodak 1.3Mp camera only downloads in
.jpg, how do I fool it into downloading in some other uncompressed format?


Many cameras (especially of that vintage) don't have an uncompressed
(aka raw) format, and JPG is what you get. In that case your best bet
is submitting the original JPG image. Leave the cropping/tweaking to the
editor. For a small illustration your camera should do fine as long as
you light the subject well (eg indirect sunlight).

According to the camera specifications, the actual file format is listed as:
"Exif version 2.1 (JPEG base).


EXIF has more technical information about the image (for example it
probably encodes the exposure and focal length information) but the image
itself is JPG.

Suggestions other than borrowing Gail's very expensive Canon for my magazine
shots?


Borrow Gail too?

--
Ben Jackson

http://www.ben.com/
  #9  
Old December 12th 04, 11:41 PM
Morgans
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"C J Campbell" wrote


Even so, your Kodak 1.3Mp is wholly inadequate for any form of

publication.
You will need at least 4.0Mp to achieve high enough resolution for print.


??????????????????????????????????

ANY form of publication? I know lots of forms of publications that a 1.3
would not be an issue.

At what size are you planning to print? 8 X 10 magazine picture? Yes, for
that size, an amateur could see lose of sharpness. Smaller sizes, printing
at home, the printer will be the limiting factor, for most people.

Broad, sweeping statements like you made are seldom to stand up for all
situations. How about a less authoritarian stance?
--
Jim in NC


  #10  
Old December 12th 04, 11:50 PM
Jay Beckman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Peter Duniho" wrote in message
...

For a consumer-grade camera, as long as you set the JPEG format to the
highest resolution, lowest-compression setting, you should fine. You'd be
unlikely to notice any difference between the raw image and the compressed
one. Any of the professional-grade digital SLRs should have an option for
saving the data in a "raw" format (which typically is actually just a
proprietary, non-lossy compressed format). One of Canon's higher-end
models actually can have two memory cards installed and allows you to save
each picture twice, JPEG to one memory card and their raw format in the
other.


Peter,

I just got a Canon EOS 20D. Both .jpg and .raw can be saved to one CF card.

Just an FYI,

Jay Beckman
PP-ASEL
Chandler, AZ


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Reno Suite is Finally Done! Jay Honeck Piloting 16 December 15th 04 10:30 PM
Reno Air Races -- 2600 Miles in 2 Days! Jay Honeck Piloting 88 September 25th 04 03:48 PM
~ PHOTOS FROM THE FALLUJAH MASSACRE [won't find *these* photos on TekTeam26 Military Aviation 0 April 12th 04 01:49 AM
The Mustang Suite is done! Jay Honeck Owning 8 January 12th 04 04:48 PM
FS: Aviation History Books Neil Cournoyer Military Aviation 0 August 26th 03 08:32 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2023 AviationBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.