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Near Vertical Takeoff



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 13th 15, 05:02 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Roy Clark, \B6\
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Default Near Vertical Takeoff

Skip the ad when you can to get to the video - looks like Grant County International Airport, near Moses Lake, Washington.

http://www.wsj.com/video/near-vertic...DBA8F2F54.html
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  #2  
Old June 13th 15, 10:22 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Bruce Hoult
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Default Near Vertical Takeoff

On Saturday, June 13, 2015 at 7:02:40 AM UTC+3, Roy Clark, "B6" wrote:
Skip the ad when you can to get to the video - looks like Grant County International Airport, near Moses Lake, Washington.

http://www.wsj.com/video/near-vertic...DBA8F2F54.html


In reality, I believe it's around 50 degrees.
  #3  
Old June 13th 15, 01:13 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Charlie M. (UH & 002 owner/pilot)
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Default Near Vertical Takeoff

On Saturday, June 13, 2015 at 5:22:34 AM UTC-4, Bruce Hoult wrote:
On Saturday, June 13, 2015 at 7:02:40 AM UTC+3, Roy Clark, "B6" wrote:
Skip the ad when you can to get to the video - looks like Grant County International Airport, near Moses Lake, Washington.

http://www.wsj.com/video/near-vertic...DBA8F2F54.html


In reality, I believe it's around 50 degrees.


Not something you would see with passengers inside!
I would love to see a side view of that climb, I wonder how fast it's shedding speed?

Nice wing bend though. ;-)
  #4  
Old June 13th 15, 05:05 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Dan Marotta
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Default Near Vertical Takeoff

From CNN: "Hero pilot saves the day."
From a passenger interviewed in the terminal: "We almost died!"

I can do that in my glider, though not for quite as long...

On 6/13/2015 6:13 AM, Charlie M. (UH & 002 owner/pilot) wrote:
On Saturday, June 13, 2015 at 5:22:34 AM UTC-4, Bruce Hoult wrote:
On Saturday, June 13, 2015 at 7:02:40 AM UTC+3, Roy Clark, "B6" wrote:
Skip the ad when you can to get to the video - looks like Grant County International Airport, near Moses Lake, Washington.

http://www.wsj.com/video/near-vertic...DBA8F2F54.html

In reality, I believe it's around 50 degrees.

Not something you would see with passengers inside!
I would love to see a side view of that climb, I wonder how fast it's shedding speed?

Nice wing bend though. ;-)


--
Dan Marotta

  #5  
Old June 14th 15, 04:27 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
PBA
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Posts: 30
Default Near Vertical Takeoff

LOL @ DAn.
Awesome! Goes to show without all the ballast (human bodies) these planes have plenty of extra power.
  #6  
Old June 14th 15, 05:59 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Bruce Hoult
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Posts: 888
Default Near Vertical Takeoff

On Sunday, June 14, 2015 at 6:27:10 PM UTC+3, PBA wrote:
LOL @ DAn.
Awesome! Goes to show without all the ballast (human bodies) these planes have plenty of extra power.


There's also the regulation that large twins have to be able to continue a takeoff from V1 [1] on a single engine at max all-up weight and the given runway length, wind, temp etc.

If you actually have twice that trust, as you usually do, it's jam.

I note that the A380 has an *extremely* leisurely climb out compared to the modern twins. It only has to have 33% more than the bare minimum power, compared to 100% more for twins.

[1] if an engine fails below V1 then you stop. If above V1 then you continue, but you must accelerate to at least V2 before actually lifting off.
  #7  
Old June 14th 15, 07:38 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Andy Blackburn[_3_]
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Posts: 482
Default Near Vertical Takeoff

Yup - that's how they calculate Balanced Field Length. IIRC it's where the distance to get to V1 (takeoff decision speed), abort and stop equals the distance to continue the takeoff on one engine to 50' altitude. After V1 it takes more distance to stop than to continue on one engine.

9B
  #8  
Old June 15th 15, 12:26 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Dan Marotta
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Posts: 3,185
Default Near Vertical Takeoff

With all that extra thrust, we routinely set reduced power for takeoff.
We had a chart in the performance section of the flight manual for just
a thing. It considered runway length, density altitude, gross weight,
winds, etc. Should an engine fail, the remaining engine(s) would be
advanced to max power.

On 6/14/2015 10:59 AM, Bruce Hoult wrote:
On Sunday, June 14, 2015 at 6:27:10 PM UTC+3, PBA wrote:
LOL @ DAn.
Awesome! Goes to show without all the ballast (human bodies) these planes have plenty of extra power.

There's also the regulation that large twins have to be able to continue a takeoff from V1 [1] on a single engine at max all-up weight and the given runway length, wind, temp etc.

If you actually have twice that trust, as you usually do, it's jam.

I note that the A380 has an *extremely* leisurely climb out compared to the modern twins. It only has to have 33% more than the bare minimum power, compared to 100% more for twins.

[1] if an engine fails below V1 then you stop. If above V1 then you continue, but you must accelerate to at least V2 before actually lifting off.


--
Dan Marotta

  #9  
Old June 15th 15, 02:36 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
GM
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Posts: 214
Default Near Vertical Takeoff


I can do that in my glider, though not for quite as long...


Yes you can! Do a winch launch on one of those specially modified European winches that use over 11,000ft of line, hold that climb for 2 minutes and end up at over 4,500ft. I bet the jet cannot do that!
Uli
  #10  
Old June 15th 15, 03:01 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Dan Marotta
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Posts: 3,185
Default Near Vertical Takeoff

Wow!!! I'd love to try that!

On 6/14/2015 7:36 PM, GM wrote:
I can do that in my glider, though not for quite as long...

Yes you can! Do a winch launch on one of those specially modified European winches that use over 11,000ft of line, hold that climb for 2 minutes and end up at over 4,500ft. I bet the jet cannot do that!
Uli


--
Dan Marotta

 




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