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electric motor?



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 11th 07, 12:43 AM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
solarsell
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Posts: 4
Default electric motor?

Is there a reason an elecric motor with a backup gas or diesel generator
wouldn't work in aviation? Here's a concept car idea:
http://www.gm.com/company/gm_exp_liv...?navID=3.0.1.1


Ads
  #2  
Old January 11th 07, 12:57 AM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Charlie[_2_]
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Posts: 56
Default electric motor?

solarsell wrote:
Is there a reason an elecric motor with a backup gas or diesel generator
wouldn't work in aviation? Here's a concept car idea:
http://www.gm.com/company/gm_exp_liv...?navID=3.0.1.1


with current technology, weight
  #3  
Old January 11th 07, 05:08 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
[email protected]
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Posts: 9
Default electric motor?

solarsell wrote:
Is there a reason an elecric motor with a backup gas or diesel generator
wouldn't work in aviation?


Its not the motor, its the batteries...

Basic physics: with hydrocarbon fuels, you haul 1/14 of what it takes
to stay aloft in the fuel tank, the other 13/14 comes out of the air
around you... With electric vehicles, you haul or store ALL (14/14) of
what it takes to stay airborne.

  #4  
Old January 11th 07, 06:01 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Montblack
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Posts: 972
Default electric motor?

wrote)
Its not the motor, its the batteries...

Basic physics: with hydrocarbon fuels, you haul 1/14 of what it takes
to stay aloft in the fuel tank, the other 13/14 comes out of the air
around you... With electric vehicles, you haul or store ALL (14/14) of
what it takes to stay airborne.



13/14 by volume or by weight?

How much does the 15 minutes of air weigh - that you run through an
(average) rotax engine?

I'm using a 4 gph burn rate = 1 gallon per 15 minutes.
4,000 ft (MSL) ??

1 gallon gasoline weighs approx. ......6 lbs.
15 minutes of air..................................? lbs.

http://www.kodiakbs.com/2intro.htm
Rotax 2-stroke info

http://www.kodiakbs.com/4intro.htm
Rotax 4-stroke info


Montblack


  #5  
Old January 11th 07, 06:05 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Steve Foley
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Posts: 563
Default electric motor?

"Montblack" wrote in message


13/14 by volume or by weight?


By weight.

My O-320 cruises at around 2500RPM. That's 340 cubic inches * 2500 RPM * 60
Minutes per hour to arrive at about 400,000 gallons of air per hour.

I used 128 cubic inches per gallon. I think that may be right.


  #6  
Old January 11th 07, 06:08 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Steve Foley
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Posts: 563
Default electric motor?

OOPS!!! 320 Cubic Inches.

"Steve Foley" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
"Montblack" wrote in message


13/14 by volume or by weight?


By weight.

My O-320 cruises at around 2500RPM. That's 340 cubic inches * 2500 RPM *
60 Minutes per hour to arrive at about 400,000 gallons of air per hour.

I used 128 cubic inches per gallon. I think that may be right.



  #7  
Old January 11th 07, 06:45 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
Montblack
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Posts: 972
Default electric motor?

("Steve Foley" wrote)
My O-320 cruises at around 2500RPM. That's 340 cubic inches * 2500 RPM *60
Minutes per hour to arrive at about 400,000 gallons of air per hour.

I used 128 cubic inches per gallon. I think that may be right.



http://www.digitaldutch.com/unitconverter/
1 gallon, liquid (US)... = 231 cubic inches
1 gallon, dry (US)........ = 269 cubic inches

128 oz per gallon g


Montblack



  #8  
Old January 11th 07, 06:49 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
clare at snyder.on.ca
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Posts: 121
Default electric motor?

On Thu, 11 Jan 2007 12:01:14 -0600, "Montblack"
wrote:

wrote)
Its not the motor, its the batteries...

Basic physics: with hydrocarbon fuels, you haul 1/14 of what it takes
to stay aloft in the fuel tank, the other 13/14 comes out of the air
around you... With electric vehicles, you haul or store ALL (14/14) of
what it takes to stay airborne.



13/14 by volume or by weight?

By mass. The air WEIGHS 1bout 15 times as much as the fuel.

How much does the 15 minutes of air weigh - that you run through an
(average) rotax engine?

I'm using a 4 gph burn rate = 1 gallon per 15 minutes.
4,000 ft (MSL) ??

1 gallon gasoline weighs approx. ......6 lbs.
15 minutes of air..................................? lbs.

http://www.kodiakbs.com/2intro.htm
Rotax 2-stroke info

http://www.kodiakbs.com/4intro.htm
Rotax 4-stroke info


Montblack



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

  #9  
Old January 11th 07, 06:55 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default electric motor?


Montblack wrote:
How much does the 15 minutes of air weigh - that you run through an
(average) rotax engine?


At 4 gallons per hour, the fuel rate is 6*4=24 pounds per hour. (aprox
60% power)

The air / fuel ratio of gasoline engines is about 14 / 1, so the
airflow rate would be 336 pounds of air per hour. At standard
conditions, air weighs about 0.075 pounds per cubic foot, so the air
flow rate expressed in cubic feet per minute would be 336/0.075/60=75
cfm.

tom

  #10  
Old January 11th 07, 07:00 PM posted to rec.aviation.homebuilt
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default electric motor?


Steve Foley wrote:
My O-320 cruises at around 2500RPM. That's 340 cubic inches * 2500 RPM * 60
Minutes per hour to arrive at about 400,000 gallons of air per hour.

I used 128 cubic inches per gallon. I think that may be right.


Not to be picky, but there are 231 cubic inches in a gallon. Your
engine is a four-stroke, so it will only displace it's volume in two
revolutions, so you need to divide by two. The volumetric efficiency
will depend on throttle setting, making the calculation more difficult.
It is easier to go by way of fuel burn, since the proper ratio of fuel
to air doesn't change much in a gas engine. See above for an example.

tom

 




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