A aviation & planes forum. AviationBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » AviationBanter forum » rec.aviation newsgroups » Piloting
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

First Four-Seat, Hydrogen-Cell Airplane Flies



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old October 1st 16, 06:48 PM posted to rec.aviation.piloting
Larry Dighera
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,772
Default First Four-Seat, Hydrogen-Cell Airplane Flies


This remarkable aircraft is reminiscent of two two-place gliders joined
mid-wing by an engine pod.


http://www.avweb.com/avwebflash/news...-227041-1.html

By Elaine Kauh | September 29, 2016

A four-seat airplane powered by hydrogen fuel cells completed a first test
flight this week in Germany, reaching milestones in both size and
emissions-free technology. Researchers at the German aerospace center, the DLR,
have been developing
http://www.avweb.com/avwebflash/news/Hydrogen-Fuel-Cells-Practical-for-Aircraft-Now-226198-1.html
the HY4 model with a mission to prove that hydrogen can be a viable aviation
fuel. The flight from Stuttgart Airport lasted for 10 minutes, with two pilots
and two dummies on board, according to an Associated Press report. The
80-kilowatt motor allows for flight at a maximum speed of about 200 kilometers
per hour and a range of up to 1500 kilometers, according to the HY4 website.

Slovenian aircraft maker Pipistrel, hydrogen systems company Hydrogenics and
other researchers have partnered to develop the airplane, which features a
hydrogen fuel cell, battery and electric motor. The battery powers takeoffs and
climb, while the hydrogen cells provide efficient in-flight power. “With the
HY4, we now have an optimal platform to continue developing the use of fuel
cells on aircraft. Small passenger aircraft, such as the HY4, could soon be
used in regional transport as electric air taxis and offer a flexible and rapid
alternative to existing means of transport,” the DLR said in a statement.


Comments (2)

This is not zero emissions. Creating H2 from reformed CH4 creates CO2 as a by
product. Creating H2 from water electrolysis depends on the electric grid. It
takes more energy to electrolyze H20 to get H2 + O2 than is available in the H2
fuel to propel a vehicle. When these little facts are taken into account, fuel
cells are not as fuel efficient as claimed. One needs to look at the total
energy used to consider the system efficiency.

It is good to see that fuel cell research is continuing but do not be fooled by
the Zero Emissions label. In the US think of electric aircraft and cars as
being coal powered because that is how most electricity is generated.

Posted by: Leo LeBoeuf | September 29, 2016 8:03 PM Report this comment

Boeing tried fuel cells about 10 years ago and then donated their plane to a
college. Everyone wants distance to make EV a reality. It takes energy to make
planes, batteries and to power them. An example of "Emissions-free" is walking
for a means of travel, but still some emissions are created. The best solution
to extend the flight time that I have found is from a small company in Florida.
What they have is absolutely amazing.

Posted by: Don Lineback | September 30, 2016 7:14 AM Report this comment
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.dlr.de/dlr/en/desktopdefa.../gallery/24480

Zero-emission air transport – first flight of four-seat passenger aircraft HY4

29 September 2016

Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0).

First flight of HY4 aircraft
Download1/6Sha
On 29 September 2016, the HY4 aircraft took off on its first official flight
from Stuttgart Airport. The HY4 is the world’s first four-seat passenger
aircraft powered solely by a hydrogen fuel cell system. Researchers from the
German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR)
developed the aircraft's power train and worked on the project with industry
and research partners.

The HY4 fuel cell aircraft was developed by the DLR Institute of Engineering
Thermodynamics together with partners Hydrogenics, Pipistrel, H2FLY, the
University of Ulm and Stuttgart Airport. DLR researchers were responsible for
developing the hydrogen fuel cell power train and installing it in the
aircraft. The power train consists of a hydrogen storage system, a
low-temperature hydrogen fuel cell and a battery. The fuel cell converts
hydrogen directly into electrical energy. The only waste product from this
process is water. An electric motor uses the power thus generated to propel the
aircraft. A high-performance lithium battery covers peak power loads during
take-off and when climbing. If the hydrogen required for the fuel cell is
generated via electrolysis using power from renewable energy sources, the HY4
can fly without generating any emissions at all. The aircraft is operated by
the DLR spin-off H2FLY.

Important step for sustainable air transport

Violeta Bulc, EU Transport Commissioner on Zero Emission Flying: "I am proud
that European researchers and manufacturers are launching this hydrogen fuel
cell powered aircraft. Such forward looking activities embody the future of
zero-emission flying. The Commission firmly supports such initiatives, which
are fully in line with our new strategy for low-emission mobility. Aviation
plays an important role in bringing people together, connecting large cities as
well as remote locations. It also ensures businesses can grow and develop. The
EU will continue to support such initiatives, to drive innovation forward.
Georg Fundel, Managing Director of Flughafen Stuttgart GmbH, is delighted by
the fact that the first flight took place at Stuttgart Airport: "Further growth
is expected for Stuttgart Airport and aviation in general. For us, this is an
important reason to focus on environment-friendly and, someday, even
zero-emission aviation, as well as innovative technologies."

Electric air taxis for regional transport

"For the foreseeable future, large passenger aircraft will continue to fly
using conventional propulsion. One of the major challenges for the coming
decades, however, is bringing electromobility to the aviation industry and
making the air transport system of the future carbon dioxide neutral," explains
André Thess, Head of the DLR Institute of Engineering Thermodynamics. "Our goal
is to further improve the fuel cell power train and, in the long term, use it
on regional aircraft with up to 19 passengers." DLR is currently actively
involved in electric aviation together with industry partners Airbus Group and
Siemens, as well as 20 university institutes and Helmholtz centres as part of
the Helmholtz Association's DLR@Uni Electric Flight initiative.

The HY4 has a motor output of 80 kilowatts, a maximum speed of approximately
200 kilometres per hour and a cruising speed of 145 kilometres per hour.
Depending on speed, altitude and load, it can achieve a range of between 750
and 1500 kilometres. The most striking feature of the HY4 is its twin
fuselages, each with space for two passengers. The maximum weight of the
aircraft is 1500 kilograms. "With the HY4, we now have an optimal platform to
continue developing the use of fuel cells on aircraft," says Josef Kallo,
responsible for the HY4 project at DLR and a Professor at the University of
Ulm. "Small passenger aircraft, such as the HY4, could soon be used in regional
transport as electric air taxis and offer a flexible and rapid alternative to
existing means of transport."

Video: https://twitter.com/DLR_de/status/781535898504757248

The HY4 project

Under the aegis of the DLR Institute of Engineering Thermodynamics, which is
also responsible for the integration of the power train, the following partners
have joined forces to make the first fuel cell passenger aircraft a reality:
fuel cell manufacturer Hydrogenics, Slovenian aircraft manufacturer Pipistrel,
the University of Ulm as a scientific partner and Stuttgart airport as the home
base of the HY4. The DLR spin-off H2FLY operates the HY4 and took care of the
certification process. The project was funded by DLR and Stuttgart Airport, and
the underlying fuel cell technology was supported by the National Organisation
Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology (Nationale Organisation Wasserstoff- und
Brennstoffzellentechnologie; NOW). For further development of the propulsion
technology, DLR intends to seek funds from the German Federal Government within
the scope of the National Innovation Programme Hydrogen and Fuel Cell
Technology (NIP).

Video: blob:https://www.facebook.com/5a1c694d-b3...2-d341d18a942d

Last modified:
29/09/2016 15:11:32

Contacts

Dorothee Bürkle
German Aerospace Center (DLR)
Tel.: +49 2203 601-3492
Fax: +49 2203 601-3249

Denise Nüssle
German Aerospace Center (DLR)
Corporate Communications Stuttgart
Tel.: +49 711 6862-8086
Fax: +49 711 6862-636

Prof. Dr. André Thess
German Aerospace Center (DLR)
DLR Institute of Engineering Thermodynamics, Director
Tel.: +49 711 6862-358

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Josef Kallo
German Aerospace Center (DLR)
DLR Institute of Engineering Thermodynamics, Coordinator Energy Systems
Integration
Tel.: +49 711 6862-672
Fax: +49 711 6862-747
--------------------------------------------------


http://www.dlr.de/tt/en/desktopdefau...67_read-44808/
HY 4 - Zero-emission passenger flights
(26. November 2015)

HY4 – the aircraft

Passenger air travel with low noise, particulate matter or carbon dioxide –
emission-free flight – is currently being transformed from a vision to a
reality. The HY4 – the world’s first four-seater passenger aircraft powered
solely by a hydrogen fuel cell system and electric propulsion – marks a
milestone on this path. Electric flight with the HY4 is silent, environmentally
friendly, has greater range and is safer than its predecessors. Longstanding
experience in battery, fuel cell and hydrogen technology research in the
aviation and energy sectors make DLR and its partners experts in the fields of
‘More Electric Aircraft’ (MEA) and ‘All Electric Aircraft’ (AEA). Fuel cells
can be used in many areas of aviation. Common to all applications is the
operation at high altitudes, at low air pressure and at low ambient
temperatures. Requirements for safety and reliability are exceptionally
stringent. Fuel cell systems are being developed and investigated at the DLR
Institute of Engineering Thermodynamics, in cooperation with partners in
industry and research for MEA and AEA. The associated research work has been
conducted using DLR basic funding and is also supported by the German National
Innovation Programme for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology (NIP). The
experience acquired during the last 10 years of research is now being used to
design a hydrogen fuel cell system – the principal source of energy for the
HY4. While earlier projects and configurations were only fitted with a pilot’s
seat, the new HY4 aircraft concept can carry four people. One important detail
is the coupling of the low-temperature proton exchange membrane (LTPEM) fuel
cell with a highperformance battery, which maximises the reliability and
performance of the emissionfree propulsion system.

HY 4 technical data
Wingspan 21.36 m
Lenght 7.4 m
Empty weight (exluding fuel cell, battery and storage system) approx. 630 kg
Maximum weight 1500 kg
Weight of the power module with fuel tank approx. 400 kg
Engine output 80 kW
Fuel cell/battery continuous output 45 kW/45 kW (90 kW total)
Battery capacity approx. 21 kWh at 1°C
Maximum speed approx. 200 km/h
Cruising speed 145 km/h
Engine output when cruising at 140 km/h 26 kW
Range 750 to 1500 km

HY4 – the vision

With more than 60 regional and international airports, Germany has a
well-established, extensive network and the necessary infrastructure for the
implementation of the ‘electric air taxi’ concept. Emission-free aircraft with
sustainable electric propulsion technology (hybrid systems based on hydrogen
fuel cells and batteries) could be the beginning of a fast and flexible
passenger transportation system and contribute to reducing road congestion as
well as encouraging the useof regional airports. The four-passenger HY4 is
ideally suited for this due to its sustainable, emission-free propulsion system
and 1500-kilometre range. The modular propulsion technology system also enables
larger, visionary electrically propelled aircraft with up to 40 seats to be
envisaged.


HY4 – the partners

Together, the partners make up a strong team with years of experience in
emission-free flying, and hence offer the best prospects and high motivation
for making the defined goal an achievable reality.

Under the aegis of DLR, several partners have joined forces to make the first
fuel cell passenger aircraft a reality:

- Hydrogenics, as the global market leader in fuel cell technology, is
contributing its knowledge.

- The University of Ulm is contributing its expertise in power electronics,
hybridisation and electrical propulsion technology.

- Pipistrel, a long-standing partner of DLR, has extensive experience in
aircraft construction and electrical components.

- H2Fly will operate the HY4 and will be responsible for the certification
process.

- Stuttgart Airport has offered to be the home airport of the HY4 and is
helping to address issues regarding the integration of electric aircraft into
the air traffic system.

- The preliminary work conducted for the propulsion technology being used was
sponsored by the German National Innovation Programme for Hydrogen and Fuel
Cell Technology (NIP).
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.pipistrel.si/news/first-4...cells-takes-of
First 4-seat aircraft powered by hydrogen fuel cells takes off today

Pipistrel is proud to announce that we are one of the partners in the "HY4"
project – the world’s first four-seat passenger aircraft powered by a
zero-emission hydrogen fuel cell propulsion. The aircraft accomplished a
successful first public flight on 29. September.

thumbnail IMG 3804 thumbnail IMG 3896

HY4 took off from the airport in Stuttgart at 11:15 am and performed a short
15-minute demonstrative flight above the public and the media. The aircraft has
much more potential, but for this period the airport of Stuttgart did a great
favor to us: they stopped all the other air traffic, so the spectators could
hear the almost-completely-silent flight of the HY4.
thumbnail IMG 3925 thumbnail IMG 3978 thumbnail IMG 3943

thumbnail IMG 4090 thumbnail IMG 4080

Violeta Bulc, EU Transport Commissioner, gave a statement on zero-emission
flying:
„I am proud that European researchers and manufacturers are launching this
hydrogen fuel cell powered aircraft. Such forward looking activities embody the
future of zero-emission flying. The Commission firmly supports such
initiatives, which are fully in line with our new strategy for low-emission
mobility. Aviation plays an important role in bringing people together,
connecting large cities as well as remote locations. It also ensures businesses
can grow and develop. The EU will continue to support such initiatives, to
drive innovation forward."

Georg Fundel, Managing Director of Flughafen Stuttgart GmbH, is delighted by
the fact that the first flight took place at Stuttgart Airport:
„Further growth is expected for Stuttgart Airport and aviation in general. For
us, this is an important reason to focus on environment-friendly and, someday,
even zero-emission aviation, as well as innovative technologies.“

History repeats itself:

Almost to the day 5 years ago, the G4 aircraft was the star of all the media
once more. This was when it won the NASA challenge:
http://www.pipistrel.si/pipistrel-wo...ight-challenge
IMG 9518majhna thumbnail IMG 4090
Team of NASA 2011 GFC in front of the Taurus G4; and Pipistrel team with the
HY4 in 2016.

The story is in fact quite similar; a few faces in the team may be different,
but the amount of hard work and sleepless nights is the same.
And the gigantic step towards the green flight is enormous, too!

Ivo Boscarol, the general manager of Pipistrel, says:
“I would like to thank everyone involved in the project for their selfless
effort, for their hard work and cooperation with all the other partners. Again
we managed to push the development of aviation one more step into the green
direction!"

More information about the HY4 project:
http://www.dlr.de/tt/en/desktopdefau...x/tabid-10743/

A video of the flight can be seen he
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6q9eToc-Qjk

Media and articles:

http://hy4.org/zero-emission-air-tra...r-aircraft-hy4

German articles:
http://www.n-tv.de/panorama/Testpilo...e18750746.html
https://www.wired.de/collection/tech...-hat-abgehoben
http://www.aerokurier.de/general-avi...fliegen/700954

Slovenski clanki (Slovenian articles):
http://sierra5.net/index.php?option=...626&Ite mid=1
http://www.24ur.com/novice/gospodars...tni-polet.html
http://www.moskisvet.com/clanek/viso...ko-letalo.html
http://www.vecer.com/pipistrelovo-le...gartom-6260561


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LINKS:
http://www.hydrogenics.com/about-the...ell-technology
https://www.now-gmbh.de/en/national-...it-wasserstoff
http://www.bmvi.de/EN/TransportAndMo...tion_node.html
Ads
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
World's First hydrogen Fuel Cell-Powered Multi-rotor UAV Larry Dighera Piloting 1 June 8th 15 04:13 AM
Boeing Fuel Cell Plane Flies At Last! sisu1a Soaring 14 April 11th 08 03:49 PM
World's First Fuel Cell Powered Aircraft Flies Larry Dighera Piloting 0 April 7th 08 04:25 PM
Fuel Cell Demonstrator Airplane Larry Dighera Piloting 3 March 28th 07 02:51 PM
Atomic Hydrogen Fuel forex10@yahoo.com General Aviation 7 June 21st 06 12:02 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:29 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2017 AviationBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.