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Caution Wake Turbulence



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 23rd 06, 01:56 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
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Posts: 8
Default Caution Wake Turbulence

Hello,

Here you are tootling along on your IFR flight plan - maybe on
vectors - whatever, you're
exactly where you should be, following ATC's instructions to the
letter, and they then say


"35Siera, you have traffic at 10:00 east to west three miles 7000
feet a Boeing 737
CAUTION WAKE TURBULENCE".

So - besides looking for the Boeing, what do you do about the wake
turbulence? Tighten your seatbelt? Review your unusual attitudes
training? Prepare to kiss your *** goodbye?
Ask for a diversion? How do you know whether you need it?

- Jerry Kaidor

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  #2  
Old November 23rd 06, 02:05 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Doug[_1_]
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Posts: 248
Default Caution Wake Turbulence

Avoid his flight path. Get at a different altitude. Slow down to Va.

If you do turn upsidedown or something, turn it back rightside up.

  #4  
Old November 23rd 06, 02:32 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Newps
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Posts: 1,886
Default Caution Wake Turbulence



Sam Spade wrote:



The wise course of action is to reply "request 5 miles wake turbulence
separation."

Accept the fact they may have to vector you back around to provide
better wake turbulence.

They were trying to pass the buck to you because of the horrible crash
at KSNA several years ago that killed the burger king.

Don't accept it.


The example was clearly an enroute situation and he got the caution
because he was 1000 feet below the 737. Any more than 1000 feet of
separation and the caution would not have been given. You introduced
separation down final. Four miles is required in this situation. You
can request five if you'd like but ATC may or may not give it to you.
There was no buck passing involved.
  #5  
Old November 23rd 06, 02:33 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Ron Lee
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Posts: 295
Default Caution Wake Turbulence

" wrote:

"35Siera, you have traffic at 10:00 east to west three miles 7000
feet a Boeing 737
CAUTION WAKE TURBULENCE".

So - besides looking for the Boeing, what do you do about the wake
turbulence?


Can't say about IFR but VFR I request whatever action seems prudent to
allow time for possible wake turbulence to dissipate. I will wait
longer than perhaps required to be on the safe side.


Ron Lee
  #6  
Old November 23rd 06, 02:42 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Nathan Young
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Posts: 108
Default Caution Wake Turbulence

On 22 Nov 2006 17:56:51 -0800, " wrote:

Hello,

Here you are tootling along on your IFR flight plan - maybe on
vectors - whatever, you're
exactly where you should be, following ATC's instructions to the
letter, and they then say


"35Siera, you have traffic at 10:00 east to west three miles 7000
feet a Boeing 737
CAUTION WAKE TURBULENCE".

So - besides looking for the Boeing, what do you do about the wake
turbulence? Tighten your seatbelt? Review your unusual attitudes
training? Prepare to kiss your *** goodbye?
Ask for a diversion? How do you know whether you need it?

- Jerry Kaidor


I have crossed wake turbulence once in the scenario described, and it
was startling. I would suggest buckling the seatbelt tight at a
minimum and perhaps slowing the aircraft as others suggested to Va.

In my case, I was flying VFR South from Chicago, listening to
approach, but not talking to approach. Arrivals into Midway were from
the West/Southwest towards the East/NorthEast. This made my
flightpath approximately perpendicular to a Southwest 737. The 737
was 1000 ft above me. I was at a cruise altitude, I believe 4500.

I watched the 737 cross ahead of my flightpath, and continue towards
Chicago. I did not think much of it, then about 30 seconds later as
I caught up to his flightpath, I hit the wake. It was a perfectly
still evening, but I thought I had a midair when I hit it. It was
quite a jolt, I hit my head on the cabin ceiling and stuff flew around
the cabin.

I never lost control of the aircraft, but it was alarming. The event
had a very short duration, kind of like hitting a massive pothole in
the sky.

Anyway, the experience made me much more aware the existence of
enroute wake turbulence. If you fly from an airport near a Class B
area, I don't know what can be done about it. Jets are everywhere,
and we are typically underneath them. There really is no way to leave
the area without crossing a jet's flightpath at some point.

-Nathan

  #7  
Old November 23rd 06, 06:20 PM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
Thomas Suchan
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Posts: 1
Default Caution Wake Turbulence

Sam Spade wrote in :

They were trying to pass the buck to you because of the horrible crash
at KSNA several years ago that killed the burger king.


Just for the completeness, I guess you mean that accident?

http://aviation-safety.net/database/...1130-1&lang=en

Greets

Thomas
@EDDV
--
http://www.suchanhannover.de
please use the eMail address listed on the web page.
  #8  
Old November 29th 06, 04:14 AM posted to rec.aviation.ifr
PilotWeb.org
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Posts: 10
Default Caution Wake Turbulence

If you are under IFR, ATC should take WT separation minimums into
account when vectoring you for spacing, however you remain PIC of the
aircraft and, actually, deviating from a clearance is allowed when
deemed necessary by YOU in the interests of safety. That shouldn't be
necessary though, if you feel it is cutting it too close, ask for a box
climb, or for a couple spins in a hold to let the wake dissipate.

You are PIC.

Visit our website for more information, aviation news, job listings,
pilot profiles and resumes.

http://www.pilotweb.org/

 




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