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Towplane-Baron accident



 
 
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  #21  
Old February 27th 14, 11:38 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
cuflyer
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Default Towplane-Baron accident

At LGC, 3-21 is the designated glider ops runway.
13-31 has the ILS and gets most of the power traffic.
Both runways are often used together very safely with constant radio contact.

Tim
1FL
Occasional LGC pilot



On Monday, February 24, 2014 2:34:28 PM UTC-4, Dan Marotta wrote:
Lagrange-Calloway airport in Georga is an uncontrolled airport, meaning no

control tower. At those, there is no active runway but more a preferred

runway which is used by consensus based upon wind or other conditions.

There is nothing to preclude a pilot from using a runway different from what

everyone else is using.




Ads
  #22  
Old March 1st 14, 06:35 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
son_of_flubber
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Default Towplane-Baron accident

Prelim NTSB report

http://www.ntsb.gov/aviationquery/br...22X51922&key=1

  #23  
Old March 26th 14, 10:05 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Towplane-Baron accident

On Sunday, February 23, 2014 4:11:56 PM UTC-5, wrote:
OK guys. I guess it's time to post some of what we really know. I'm the president of Southern eagles Soaring Club at LaGrange. We were not operating Saturday and I was not at the field. The Civil Air Patrol had been operating their L23 towed by their 172, for several hours from runway 3.



The Baron had been doing ILS low approaches to runway 31. They landed and refueled. There were various reports of what the Baron was doing before it crashed, including a missed approach from a practice ILS, a take off, and a go around. With all these reports, you can judge for your self the accuracy. Everyone agreed that they did not hear any radio calls from the Baron.



The 172 and L23 were stopped on runway 3, south of runway 31. They never crossed the runway. The crews were very experienced, with 2 CFIG's in the L23 and a retired Air Force pilot and now Delta Captain flying the 172. One of the CFIGs is also a club member.



The crews saw the Baron at low altitude along runway 31. It pulled up very nose high, rolled to the left from 100-200 feet, and crashed in an approximate 60 degree nose down attitude. The front seat pilots were killed on impact. The passenger in the back later died at the hospital.



We do not now, nor will we ever know what made the PIC take the action that he did. They could have been flying simulated instruments, practicing single engine, had an engine failure, or any of a number of things.



Since the names have been release, we do know that the two co-owners were in the aircraft along with another pilot. Records show one of the co-owners was multi-engine rated. No records on the other co-owner. The third person did hold an ATP and instructors rating. We do not know the seating arrangement or who was at the controls.



All the noise about a glider being involved was from one person that was interviewed by two TV stations. He said the Baron was trying to avoid a glider. It unclear as to his actually seeing the crash. The only glider operating that day was sitting on runway 3 behind the tow plane.



Also to show the accuracy of the reporting, one of the stations reported the Baron had flown from Panama City, FL to LaGrange that morning. They used a screen shot from flightAware.com to confirm it. When we checked flightaware, it did indeed show a flight from Panama City as being the last flight they had recorded. Of course, That flight took place in October, 2013!



If any FACTS become available, I'll let you know. However, conjecture will not accomplish anything and could hurt our sport.



Charlie


please expound on "everyone" in your statement "agreed that they did not hear any radio calls from the Baron" because i have two witnesses who said they "distinctly" heard multiple radio calls from the baron 55 pertaining to traffic pattern radio calls. So your credibility of your "facts" directly conflict with mine, and i will tell you one thing, the hundreds of hours that i flew with my father, the pilot of the baron 55 who was killed, i can never recall a time when he failed to report an approach radio call, so either he screwed up that day or the CAP tow pilot was to incompetent to hear the oncoming traffic. PS. im always open for more info to find out if my dad screwed up bad or not, i just wanna know, and providing falsified information will not help.
  #24  
Old March 26th 14, 03:47 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Henry Retting
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Default Towplane-Baron accident

All pilots screw up son. With over 45,000 hours flying the smallest to the biggest and never scratching any paint, I have screwed up enough to be convince that a GOD does indeed exist and believe that today or tomorrow GOD could be too busy to help.
Your father did what all pilots do and reacted to the event the best way he could.
I would bet on my son's life that he was all in doing his very best.
If you feel he was a good pilot then he was and I also bet he knew and accepted the moment he got out of bed and went into motion risk began. The process of looking for answers to an aircraft accident is cutthroat. It has to be because deep down inside, we know we could be next. It is the 'slicing and dicing' that aviators do going back a hundred years that forces all of us to do our very best, to be held to scrutiny, even after death.
Any number of things could have contributed to the accident. Questions without answers. It's tough. But this much I can guarantee, everybody is paying attention and not thinking negative thoughts about your father.
Be at peace.
R
  #25  
Old March 26th 14, 04:57 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Towplane-Baron accident

Wow, what a wonderful post!

I wish I had had the opportunity to read these words back in 1988 when my sister and her husband died in a Cessna crash on the side of a mountain in Utah. It took quite a while to come to the same conclusion that Henry points out here. Questions are many, answers are few and there is no way to change it.

Robert


On Wednesday, March 26, 2014 9:47:30 AM UTC-5, Henry Retting wrote:
All pilots screw up son. With over 45,000 hours flying the smallest to the biggest and never scratching any paint, I have screwed up enough to be convince that a GOD does indeed exist and believe that today or tomorrow GOD could be too busy to help. Your father did what all pilots do and reacted to the event the best way he could. I would bet on my son's life that he was all in doing his very best. If you feel he was a good pilot then he was and I also bet he knew and accepted the moment he got out of bed and went into motion risk began. The process of looking for answers to an aircraft accident is cutthroat. It has to be because deep down inside, we know we could be next. It is the 'slicing and dicing' that aviators do going back a hundred years that forces all of us to do our very best, to be held to scrutiny, even after death. Any number of things could have contributed to the accident. Questions without answers. It's tough. But this much I can guarantee, everybody is paying attention and not thinking negative thoughts about your father. Be at peace. R


  #26  
Old March 26th 14, 10:30 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Towplane-Baron accident

I am so very sorry for your loss. I think that all of us who strap ourselves into airplanes and sailplanes understands and accepts, at least on some level, that we may very well not get back out of that aircraft alive. We go on flying / soaring anyway because for a lot of us it is the passion of our lives. It's the one thing that makes everything else that we have to do...worthwhile. I don't know if this will offer you any comfort or not but I always told my wife and kids that if I died in an airplane accident that I did not want them to ever think or say anything bad about little airplanes or flying. If I had an accident it was probably my fault. I also
asked them to be mindful of how very special flying was to me and how much joy it brought me in my life. Even if I somehow knew that I would someday die flying, I would go on doing it anyway. It means that much to me. My guess is that your Dad would feel the same. My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family.

Brian k. Lott
  #27  
Old March 27th 14, 04:20 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Towplane-Baron accident

On Saturday, February 22, 2014 9:50:49 PM UTC-5, Jp Stewart wrote:
Odd circumstance: http://www.lagrangenews.com/news/hom...llaway-Airport



JP


ironically that was the last thing he asked me, "did you schedule a lesson for sunday" i didnt go to that lesson on that sunday but im starting back today, got 6 hours before my checkride. I know my mom will not like me flying but i love it too much, like you said, and i wont let this event ground me.
  #28  
Old April 1st 14, 12:01 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
SoaringXCellence
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Default Towplane-Baron accident

JP,

My father, a highly competitive soaring pilot, died in a sailplane accident in 1978 during the US Nationals at Minden. I was told during his funeral that I would probably not take up flying My response has always been that events in the lives of other people are not restrictions on my life, but that there are always things to learn from tragic circumstances. Unfortunately, in my father's case, there has never been a clear explanation of the cause, (But JJ's article "Don't Smack the Mountain" is probably the best guess)

In spite of that, I've been flying since 1985, now with more than 5500 hours (more than three times my father's hours) and while I've had my share of close calls, I've enjoyed flying.

As noted above, each time we step into an aircraft we increase our risks. Some time in the future we may encounter a fatal error, perhaps not of our own making. In the mean time I'm delighted to be able to fly and experience the feelings it gives me.

I understand your loss, look for joy in the rest of life.

Mike
  #29  
Old June 3rd 18, 07:59 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Towplane-Baron accident

This federal district court report provides some detailed discussions and the legal outcome of this accident. The United States was found at fault; the CAP tow and glider pilots were on an Air Force assigned mission and thus covered by the Federal Tort Claims Act. https://www.scribd.com/document/3563...-United-States

  #30  
Old June 3rd 18, 02:51 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
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Default Towplane-Baron accident

There is mitigating background to this matter:

The local airport authority (political appointees) had, for years, created a hostile operating environment for glider flying at KLGC. It began with attempting to restrict glider operations to weekend days only, along with other nitnoy demands like gliders could not be assembled in a grass area off to the side of seldom used taxiway (rather, they wanted us to assemble in the middle of the refueling area tarmac in the way of taxiing/refueling traffic). Then the club received a letter from the airport manager demanding that the club permanently relocate elsewhere.

The club refused the relocation notice, knowing that the airport had accepted federal funds on numerous occasions and thus was obliv

 




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