A aviation & planes forum. AviationBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » AviationBanter forum » rec.aviation newsgroups » Soaring
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Help with Grob Needed



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old January 10th 04, 05:24 AM
Scott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Help with Grob Needed

We're having some difficulty getting repairs done on our grob 103. we have
an aileron with a diagonal crease in it from the trailing interior edge to
the leading outside edge of the aileron. Anyway, Grob America here in Ohio
has taken our wings, but with pessimistic views. They have said they've had
trouble with talking to Grob on what needs to be done. I was wondering if
anyone out there has any contacts directly to Grob to get something done. Or
if anyone knows anyone out there with information on what to do and what
needs to be done, whether it is to be replace fixed or whatnot. Thanks in
advance to anyone who can help.




-----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
-----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----
Ads
  #2  
Old January 10th 04, 03:53 PM
JJ Sinclair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Scott,
More information, please. How was the aileron damaged and exactly what is the
damage? Ailerons can be repaired as long as the total weight and trailing edge
weight doesn't exceed the specs.
JJ Sinclair
  #3  
Old January 10th 04, 05:18 PM
Scott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

We're not sure how it was damaged. It looks like it took time to develop.
The only damage is the stress line ,I had called it a crease, it's on the
bottom only and it is a line popped out. Almost as if someone took a steel
rod with a lot of pressure from the insides and drug it in the manner I
described before. Grob America hasn't been not wanting to work on this at
all because of delays/no help from Grob Germany. They told us to just keep
flying it. We flew it most of the summer with this damage, but our A&P wont
sign it off unless this is fixed. The only thing we can see the damaged
coming from is turning hard while flying to fast. We just want to be able to
fly it this spring.
"JJ Sinclair" wrote in message
...
Scott,
More information, please. How was the aileron damaged and exactly what is

the
damage? Ailerons can be repaired as long as the total weight and trailing

edge
weight doesn't exceed the specs.
JJ Sinclair





-----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
-----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----
  #4  
Old January 10th 04, 06:45 PM
JJ Sinclair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

If memory serves me right, the lower skin is made up of 3 layers of thin cloth
(92110) and has no foam core. Where this thin skin meets the stronger top skin,
a gelgoat crack may develop. I would grind away some gelgoat in the crease area
and see if the glass fibers are broken. If not, you are safe to keep flying it,
its just a cosmetic repair. If the fibers are broken, I would ask Blufton to
repair it. Note, after repairs one must weigh the aileron and then suspend it
on its hinges and check for trailing edge weight to be within specs. Additional
counter balance may be added to the area forward of the hinge line as long as
total aileron weight is not exceeded.
JJ Sinclair
  #5  
Old January 11th 04, 03:42 AM
Steve
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The Grob 103 Twin II Repair Instructions Manual I have, dated
September 1981, says the lower surface of the aileron is 2 layers
92125 diagonal. No core material. All the rest of what JJ said, I
would say is good and true.

Does this mark run the full span of the aileron, or at roughly 45
degrees to the aileron? You said it goes from the trailing interior
edge to leading outside edge of the aileron. It could simply be a
crack in the finish at the edge of an overlap joint of the outer layer
of glass structure.

Steve Leonard
  #6  
Old January 11th 04, 06:07 AM
Scott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

That is correct about the line.
"Steve" wrote in message
om...
The Grob 103 Twin II Repair Instructions Manual I have, dated
September 1981, says the lower surface of the aileron is 2 layers
92125 diagonal. No core material. All the rest of what JJ said, I
would say is good and true.

Does this mark run the full span of the aileron, or at roughly 45
degrees to the aileron? You said it goes from the trailing interior
edge to leading outside edge of the aileron. It could simply be a
crack in the finish at the edge of an overlap joint of the outer layer
of glass structure.

Steve Leonard





-----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
-----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help, Need Complete Front Canopy for Grob 103 Carl Buehler Soaring 0 December 28th 03 03:15 AM
Grob 103 bulletin becomes AD Mike Borgelt Soaring 0 October 3rd 03 12:47 AM
Grob Repair BTIZ Soaring 3 September 30th 03 04:14 PM
how many pounds thrust needed ? cdubya Soaring 10 September 14th 03 04:28 AM
E2-C wheel bearings needed CaptAro Restoration 1 July 19th 03 04:32 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2020 AviationBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.