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Rosie, pt 6 - Rosie 68.jpg (1/1)



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 26th 16, 01:07 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.aviation
Mitchell Holman[_3_]
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Default Rosie, pt 6 - Rosie 68.jpg (1/1)




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  #2  
Old August 29th 16, 01:05 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.aviation
lui meme
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Default Rosie, pt 6 - Rosie 68.jpg (1/1)

Le 26/08/2016 14:07, Mitchell Holman a écrit :

Looks like a Heinkel he-111 production line, no ?

Joan
  #3  
Old August 30th 16, 01:24 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.aviation
Mitchell Holman[_3_]
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Default Rosie, pt 6 - Rosie 68.jpg (1/1)

lui meme wrote in news:57c4251c$0$3333
:

Le 26/08/2016 14:07, Mitchell Holman a écrit :

Looks like a Heinkel he-111 production line, no ?

Joan



Yep. The Germans and British had Rosies.

I don't think the Japanese did tho.



  #4  
Old August 30th 16, 03:34 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.aviation
Savageduck[_3_]
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Default Rosie, pt 6 - Rosie 68.jpg (1/1)

On 2016-08-30 12:24:14 +0000, Mitchell Holman said:

lui meme wrote in news:57c4251c$0$3333
:

Le 26/08/2016 14:07, Mitchell Holman a écrit :

Looks like a Heinkel he-111 production line, no ?

Joan



Yep. The Germans and British had Rosies.

I don't think the Japanese did tho.


Japan's industrial labor moved to a war time footing around 1937.
From1944 to the end of the war they had no "Rosies" as such, but the
slave labor and male labor force couldn't match Allied production so
there was a dramatic change in the role of Japanese women and children
in that very male society.

In the early years of the war, Japanese women were relegated to various
volunteer associations, which did not involve direct factory work.
However, by 1943, the loss of men required that able women work in
factories. A women’s volunteer labor corps was formed and by 1944 more
than four million women worked in seventeen important industrial
sectors, such as aircraft manufacturing, munitions, electrical parts
factories, pharmaceuticals, and textiles. In fact, all women who were
“able”—that is unmarried and old enough to leave school, or about age
15—were required to work. Even married women were strongly encouraged
to work.*
Although the number of Japanese women who labored on the technological
home front during World War II didn’t come near the percentage of
American women who went to work in industry, their presence is still
historically significant and is similar to the U.S story. Like American
women, Japanese women experienced the double-edge sword of being
encouraged to work in industry, while cultural constraints went against
the very premise of women working for wages, especially in occupations
viewed as technological in nature. Japanese women were paid much less
than their male counterparts in these new factory positions. In some
ways the Japanese story was worse. Food was scarce at the end of the
war and Japanese women were haunted by continual hunger. In addition,
the industrial work was hard, noisy, and dirty and many young women
were kept in restrictive barracks near the factory during their wartime
work service.

As early as 1941 Japanese women were used in ammunition manufacturing:



Many women were also moved into farm labor to replace drafted male farm
workers. The due to the success of the US bombing campaign massive
amounts of weapons manufacture, especially small arms, was moved into
rural homes where women were used. Female children also became part of
the factory labor force. Boys were allocated to cadet military training
programs.

Here are Japanese school girls at a lathe in shell production.



--
Regards,

Savageduck
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