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Maintenance Personel



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 4th 03, 04:24 AM
Charles Talleyrand
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Default Maintenance Personel

How is aircraft maintenance organized? Is you average mechanic assigned to a plane or to
a subsystem? In other words, is the mechanic assigned to Airplane #1234, or to "left
wing hydraulics"?

-Thanks


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  #2  
Old August 4th 03, 05:16 AM
S. Sampson
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Default

"Charles Talleyrand" wrote
How is aircraft maintenance organized? Is you average mechanic assigned to a plane or

to
a subsystem? In other words, is the mechanic assigned to Airplane #1234, or to "left
wing hydraulics"?


Back when I was in (70's and 80's) we started out with the time-tested crew chiefs
and specialists. Using this system, the crew chiefs busted their ass on their plane, and
the specialists mostly operated the BBQ and stood around smoking. Somewhere in
the 80's they came up with the "everyone is a crew chief" concept, and specialists now
had to rig their own jets to work on their subsystems. Before, a crew chief hooked up
all the AGE and put it in a state where the specialists could begin work. Later, the
specialists met with the crew chief and the crew chief ordered all the AGE, and when
it arrived, the specialists hooked it up, and ran it. The crew chief then went off to do
his own work, or assist other specialists. On big planes, you have several crew chiefs
and probably five jobs being worked by various specialists. When everything's all
fixed, the crew chief owns the jet and they clean it up for the next flight and complete
the paperwork (most times today, the flight crew is in-place waiting for the crew chief
to release the jet, as they are almost never ready for flight at the crew-show time).

Where this tends to fail, is when you have an electronic specialist (for example) given
the task of putting air in the tire. I think we've all seen the picture of the A1C
blown-up
on the ramp, with his nice regulation haircut being the only thing left of his head, when
he decided to air up the nose wheel with the hi-pressure cart. Speaking of BBQ meat...

Back in Thailand, many crew chiefs deployed to central shops, instead of being assigned
individual tail numbers. Today, almost all jet tail numbers have a crew chief, and
assistant.
They own the whole jet, and are responsible for the 781 forms that say it is ready for
flight.


  #3  
Old August 4th 03, 07:37 AM
Full Name
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Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 04 Aug 2003 04:16:58 GMT, "S. Sampson" wrote:

"Charles Talleyrand" wrote
How is aircraft maintenance organized? Is you average mechanic assigned to a plane or

to
a subsystem? In other words, is the mechanic assigned to Airplane #1234, or to "left
wing hydraulics"?


Back when I was in (70's and 80's) we started out with the time-tested crew chiefs
and specialists. Using this system, the crew chiefs busted their ass on their plane, and
the specialists mostly operated the BBQ and stood around smoking.


Must have been the Russian Air Force..
  #4  
Old August 4th 03, 02:48 PM
Longtailedlizard
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Posts: n/a
Default

How is aircraft maintenance organized? Is you average mechanic assigned to a
plane or to
a subsystem? In other words, is the mechanic assigned to Airplane #1234, or
to "left
wing hydraulics"?



First and foremost, are you looking at maintenance in the Air Force, Army,
or the Navy/Marine Corps.
A brief rundown on the Navy/Marine Corps.
Navy has plane captains, crewchiefs are usually a position assigned to a
flight crew member. I.e. an E-4 maybe flying as a crewchief today while a E-6
may fly as a second crewman that day, opposite the next.
You cannot join the Navy to be a plane captain. Wither you join to be a
avionics technician or a structual mechanic, both will go to the line become
qualified plane captains, (refuel, daily, turnaround inspections, etc, etc.)
After awhile, you will report to your particular shop specialty. But it
doesn't stop their, "cross training" begins.
To give you an idea about how fanatical the Navy is on cross training, look
at there NEC's (Naval Enlisted Classification) or MOS in other sevices.
http://buperscd.technology.navy.mil/...8/nec/ASMP.htm

I was an AT (avionics) 8380, (UH-1N organizational maint. tech), but as you
can see AD's (jet mechs), AM's (structure mechs) and AE's (electricians) are
all also 8380's.
On many occassions all different rates we add muscle power to an engine
change, blade track, pulling panels, changing boxes, etc, etc.
With all that said, you maybe assigned to "I" level (intermmdiate)
maintenance. Thats where you would work on a specific box or engine. With this
you are usually assigned to a NAS or ships company.
As with everything in the military, this is not written in stone, some
squadrons/ships may operate differently do to the type aircraft they operate.
There are always exceptions to the rule.

J

  #5  
Old August 5th 03, 10:47 PM
begme
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Posts: n/a
Default

You aren't describing the navy system.
Airforce perhaps?

"S. Sampson" wrote in message
. ..
"Charles Talleyrand" wrote
How is aircraft maintenance organized? Is you average mechanic assigned

to a plane or
to
a subsystem? In other words, is the mechanic assigned to Airplane

#1234, or to "left
wing hydraulics"?


Back when I was in (70's and 80's) we started out with the time-tested

crew chiefs
and specialists. Using this system, the crew chiefs busted their ass on

their plane, and
the specialists mostly operated the BBQ and stood around smoking.

Somewhere in
the 80's they came up with the "everyone is a crew chief" concept, and

specialists now
had to rig their own jets to work on their subsystems. Before, a crew

chief hooked up
all the AGE and put it in a state where the specialists could begin work.

Later, the
specialists met with the crew chief and the crew chief ordered all the

AGE, and when
it arrived, the specialists hooked it up, and ran it. The crew chief then

went off to do
his own work, or assist other specialists. On big planes, you have

several crew chiefs
and probably five jobs being worked by various specialists. When

everything's all
fixed, the crew chief owns the jet and they clean it up for the next

flight and complete
the paperwork (most times today, the flight crew is in-place waiting for

the crew chief
to release the jet, as they are almost never ready for flight at the

crew-show time).

Where this tends to fail, is when you have an electronic specialist (for

example) given
the task of putting air in the tire. I think we've all seen the picture

of the A1C
blown-up
on the ramp, with his nice regulation haircut being the only thing left of

his head, when
he decided to air up the nose wheel with the hi-pressure cart. Speaking of

BBQ meat...

Back in Thailand, many crew chiefs deployed to central shops, instead of

being assigned
individual tail numbers. Today, almost all jet tail numbers have a crew

chief, and
assistant.
They own the whole jet, and are responsible for the 781 forms that say it

is ready for
flight.




  #6  
Old August 5th 03, 11:35 PM
Larry
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Posts: n/a
Default

How is aircraft maintenance organized? Is you average mechanic assigned
to a plane or to
a subsystem? In other words, is the mechanic assigned to Airplane #1234,

or to "left
wing hydraulics"?

All right, I'll bite. I think the Cdr came the closest. The rest of you all
"tap danced" around the original question.

In other words, is the mechanic assigned to Airplane #1234, or to "left
wing hydraulics"?

Yes, the basic idea is that each aircraft is divided into "subsystems" or
areas of responsibility. Using your example: each mechanic (assigned to the
mech shop) would perform preventive and corrective maintenance on those
areas of the aircraft that relate to the engine and fuel systems as directed
by the shop supervisor. Other workcenters take care of other systems in the
aircraft.

This is the basic idea. More details are in the 4790 (a book about 3 inches
thick).


Larry
AECS (AW/SW/MTS)
Disabled Combat Veteran
USN Retired

20 years of Navy in my rear view mirror
and getting further away every day ;-)





"Charles Talleyrand" wrote in message
...
How is aircraft maintenance organized? Is you average mechanic assigned

to a plane or to
a subsystem? In other words, is the mechanic assigned to Airplane #1234,

or to "left
wing hydraulics"?

-Thanks




 




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