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Ultralight altitude record



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 28th 05, 01:40 AM
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
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Default Ultralight altitude record

What is the altitude record for an ultralight?

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
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  #2  
Old May 28th 05, 01:45 AM
John Ammeter
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On Fri, 27 May 2005 19:40:41 -0500, "Dan, U.S. Air Force,
retired" wrote:

What is the altitude record for an ultralight?

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired


Easiest way to get this info is to simply ask Jim
Campbell... I'm sure he could check his logbook for the data
and let you know when and how high he was...

John
  #3  
Old May 28th 05, 01:51 AM
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
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John Ammeter wrote:

On Fri, 27 May 2005 19:40:41 -0500, "Dan, U.S. Air Force,
retired" wrote:


What is the altitude record for an ultralight?

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired



Easiest way to get this info is to simply ask Jim
Campbell... I'm sure he could check his logbook for the data
and let you know when and how high he was...

John


We already knew he's high. The reason I asked is he claims the record. I
want to know who really holds the record.

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
  #4  
Old May 28th 05, 03:33 AM
Darrel Toepfer
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Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired wrote:

We already knew he's high. The reason I asked is he claims the record. I
want to know who really holds the record.


http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/...recordid=56393
Highest Flying Propeller-Driven Aircraft
The highest ever altitude reached by a propeller-driven aircraft is
29,413 m (96,500 ft), by the unmanned, solar-powered Helios Prototype
flying wing over the Hawaiian Island of Kauai on August 13, 2001.
Commissioned by NASA and developed by Aerovironment Inc. of Monrovia,
California, USA, Helios is one of a new breed of slow-flying,
high-altitude aircraft that its makers believe will present a viable
alternative to communications satellites in the future.

http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/...recordid=44049
Highest Hot-Air Balloon Altitude
Per Lindstrand achieved the altitude record of 19,811 m. (64,997 ft.) in
a Colt 600 hot-air balloon over Laredo, Texas, USA, on June 6, 1988.

http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/...recordid=51479
Highest Flying Birds
The highest altitude recorded for a bird is 11,300 m. (37,000 ft.), for
a Ruppell’s vulture (Gyps rueppellii), which collided with a commercial
aircraft over Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, on November 29, 1973.

http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/...recordid=56167
Highest Sky-Diving Dog
They say you can't teach an old dog new tricks. Try telling that to
Brutus, the world's busiest skydiving dog! The miniature dachshund has
made more than 71 separate skydives, accompanied by owner Ron Sirull.
Brutus follows in the paw-steps of Katie, a British Jack Russell
(pictured above) who made the first ever doggie skydive in 1987 from a
height of 3,658 m 12,000 ft). Brutus has since broken Katie's record
with a jump of 4,572 m (15,000 ft).

WANT TO KNOW MORE?
Although parachuting dates back to the 1780s, it took another 150 years
for people to throw themselves out of airplanes for fun! The sport of
skydiving became really popular in the 1970s, when divers began to
attempt mid-air acrobatics before landing on a specified target.
Skydivers typically freefall about 762 m (2,500 ft) before opening their
parachute. Today's steerable 'chutes allow the diver a high degree of
control over both their speed and direction.

CHECK THIS OUT…
Airhostess Vesna Vulovic survived a fall of 10,160 m (33,330 ft) without
a parachute when her DC-9 plane blew up over the former Czechoslovakia
on January 26, 1972!
  #5  
Old May 28th 05, 04:24 AM
dje
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In the US I believe they are not allowed above 17,999 ft.

From Ultralight news.com:

"A Falcon UL still claims the altitude record of 26,900'."

David

"Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
What is the altitude record for an ultralight?

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired



  #6  
Old May 28th 05, 05:13 AM
Anthony W
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dje wrote:
In the US I believe they are not allowed above 17,999 ft.

From Ultralight news.com:

"A Falcon UL still claims the altitude record of 26,900'."

David


I can't find it but for what it's worth, I once read that a Mitchel U2
was flown to about the same altitude over Germany. It's a cool little
plane but at 6'5", if I could fit in one, it would never get me off the
ground (even if I became anorexic and not F'ing likely either...)

Tony
  #7  
Old May 28th 05, 07:45 AM
David O
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"Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired" wrote:

What is the altitude record for an ultralight?

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired


In 1989, Eric Scott Winton flew his Facet Opal (an ultralight as
defined by Australian regs) to an altitude of 9,189 m (approx 30,150
ft) over Tyagarah Aerodrome, NSW Australia. The powerplant was a 40
hp Rotax 447.

Unfortunately, Mr. Winton later died when the wing of his Facet Opal
folded (allegedly while buzzing his grandmother's house).

It should be noted that Australian regulations allow more weight for
ultralight aircraft than USA regulations.

Mr. Winton's record is recognized by the Fédération Aéronautique
Internationale under two classes,

1) Class C (Airplanes) Sub-class C-1a/0 (Landplanes: take off weight
less than 300 kg) Group 1 : piston engine

2) Class R (Microlights) Sub-class RAL1 (Microlights : Movable
Aerodynamic Control / Landplane / Flown with one person)

Here is a picture of Mr. Winton's Facet Opal

http://airplanezone.com/NewsgroupPix/Facet_Opal.php

Here is a link to the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale website

http://www.fai.org


David O



  #8  
Old May 28th 05, 08:19 AM
Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
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David O wrote:
"Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired" wrote:


What is the altitude record for an ultralight?

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired



In 1989, Eric Scott Winton flew his Facet Opal (an ultralight as
defined by Australian regs) to an altitude of 9,189 m (approx 30,150
ft) over Tyagarah Aerodrome, NSW Australia. The powerplant was a 40
hp Rotax 447.

Unfortunately, Mr. Winton later died when the wing of his Facet Opal
folded (allegedly while buzzing his grandmother's house).

It should be noted that Australian regulations allow more weight for
ultralight aircraft than USA regulations.

Mr. Winton's record is recognized by the Fédération Aéronautique
Internationale under two classes,

1) Class C (Airplanes) Sub-class C-1a/0 (Landplanes: take off weight
less than 300 kg) Group 1 : piston engine

2) Class R (Microlights) Sub-class RAL1 (Microlights : Movable
Aerodynamic Control / Landplane / Flown with one person)

Here is a picture of Mr. Winton's Facet Opal

http://airplanezone.com/NewsgroupPix/Facet_Opal.php

Here is a link to the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale website

http://www.fai.org


David O

It's a rather neat looking aircraft.

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired
  #9  
Old May 28th 05, 12:42 PM
Blueskies
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"Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired" wrote in message news:[email protected]
What is the altitude record for an ultralight?

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired


There are records for all type of these crafts. Common limitation is EW of 254 lbs, max airspeed 55 knots, and no more
than 5 gallons of fuel. Variables include landing gear and control configuration.

Data below from the 1998 NAA record book...

Weight shift trike solo: altitude 31890 ft over France
Weight shift trike, multiplace: altitude 19606 ft again in France
Rigid wing, aerodynamic controls, solo: altitude 30000 ft over Australia
Rigid wing, aerodynamic controls, multiplace: altitude 23435 over Italy
Rigid wing, aerodynamic controls, solo Seaplane: altitude (no records registered)
Rigid wing, aerodynamic controls, multiplace Seaplane: altitude (no records registered)
Foot launched powered hang glider: altitude 17159 ft over France
Foot launched powered paraglider: altitude 16572 ft over France





  #10  
Old May 28th 05, 01:14 PM
Jez
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"Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

We already knew he's high. The reason I asked is he claims the record. I
want to know who really holds the record.

Dan, U.S. Air Force, retired


As far as I know an acquaintance of mine, Richard Meredith-Hardy, probably
holds the record. He flew over Mt Everest last year is a much modified
flexwing, with oxygen kit etc. Here's a link to his exploits for those
interested in these things: http://www.flymicro.com/everest/

Jez


 




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