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1980s: Technician goes joyriding in A-4 Skyhawk.



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 13th 05, 12:14 PM
Rick
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Default 1980s: Technician goes joyriding in A-4 Skyhawk.

There was an incident this past week where a Cessna Citation jet
disappeared from St. Augustine Airport, only to turn-up at an airport
outside Atlanta. Reports conflict as to whether the plane was damaged
in any way; certainly not seriously, at any rate.

We were talking about this ambitious joyride at work, and I remembered
a case in the eighties where a military technician, who I believe was
an accomplished glider pilot with a world altitude record, took an A-4
for a spin in the middle of the night -- perhaps over the holidays
while the field was closed. It might have been at El Toro.

Does anyone remember this? I promised a friend a link to this story if
I can find it.

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  #2  
Old October 13th 05, 02:15 PM
Joe Delphi
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"Rick" wrote in message
oups.com...

We were talking about this ambitious joyride at work, and I remembered
a case in the eighties where a military technician, who I believe was
an accomplished glider pilot with a world altitude record, took an A-4
for a spin in the middle of the night -- perhaps over the holidays
while the field was closed. It might have been at El Toro.

Does anyone remember this? I promised a friend a link to this story if
I can find it.


I remember this, it was indeed at MCAS El Toro and at night too. I belive
it was an enlisted man, aircraft maintenance type, who had access to a
simulator and knew that he would probably get in trouble, but REALLY,
REALLY, wanted to try his hand at flying an A-4. He landed safely and was
immediately arrested as the Marines don't take kindly to having their
aircraft stolen. I think they threw the UCMJ book at him. Perhaps they
should have given him pilot training, he may have ended up being a valuable
asset.

JD


  #3  
Old October 13th 05, 04:40 PM
external usenet poster
 
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"Joe Delphi" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
"Rick" wrote in message
oups.com...

We were talking about this ambitious joyride at work, and I remembered
a case in the eighties where a military technician, who I believe was
an accomplished glider pilot with a world altitude record, took an A-4
for a spin in the middle of the night -- perhaps over the holidays
while the field was closed. It might have been at El Toro.

Does anyone remember this? I promised a friend a link to this story if
I can find it.


I remember this, it was indeed at MCAS El Toro and at night too. I belive
it was an enlisted man, aircraft maintenance type, who had access to a
simulator and knew that he would probably get in trouble, but REALLY,
REALLY, wanted to try his hand at flying an A-4. He landed safely and was
immediately arrested as the Marines don't take kindly to having their
aircraft stolen. I think they threw the UCMJ book at him.


So does he still 'live' in Leavonworth?


  #4  
Old October 13th 05, 11:04 PM
Dudley Henriques
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This type of incident has happened before. I seem to remember a crew chief
snagging a ride in an F86D (I think it was the tripple nickle). He blew the
landing but not all that bad. Both he and the airplane lived to fly another
day.
Also, a B25 incident out of Keesler Field after the Korean War. Enlisted guy
lost the left engine due to misplacement of the mixture and then tried a
turn into that dead engige below Vmc. You DON'T do that in a B25 and live
very long. He crashed off the beach near Gulfport I think. I can't remember
if he was killed.
Dudley Henriques
"Rick" wrote in message
oups.com...
There was an incident this past week where a Cessna Citation jet
disappeared from St. Augustine Airport, only to turn-up at an airport
outside Atlanta. Reports conflict as to whether the plane was damaged
in any way; certainly not seriously, at any rate.

We were talking about this ambitious joyride at work, and I remembered
a case in the eighties where a military technician, who I believe was
an accomplished glider pilot with a world altitude record, took an A-4
for a spin in the middle of the night -- perhaps over the holidays
while the field was closed. It might have been at El Toro.

Does anyone remember this? I promised a friend a link to this story if
I can find it.



  #5  
Old October 14th 05, 02:36 AM
vincent p. norris
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While I was in the Marines, we got copies of the Air Force Accident
Reports (that may not have been its precise name).

One issue reported an accident that resulted when a crew chief, who
was running up the engines of a C-47 one morning, succumbed to
temptation and went flying. And crashed.

The official cause of the accident was reported as "Lack of Flight
Training."

That's why we referred to the publication as the "Air Force Comics."

vince norris
  #6  
Old October 14th 05, 04:42 AM
Paul
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Default


"Joe Delphi" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
"Rick" wrote in message
oups.com...

We were talking about this ambitious joyride at work, and I remembered
a case in the eighties where a military technician, who I believe was
an accomplished glider pilot with a world altitude record, took an A-4
for a spin in the middle of the night -- perhaps over the holidays
while the field was closed. It might have been at El Toro.

Does anyone remember this? I promised a friend a link to this story if
I can find it.


I remember this, it was indeed at MCAS El Toro and at night too. I belive
it was an enlisted man, aircraft maintenance type, who had access to a
simulator and knew that he would probably get in trouble, but REALLY,
REALLY, wanted to try his hand at flying an A-4. He landed safely and was
immediately arrested as the Marines don't take kindly to having their
aircraft stolen. I think they threw the UCMJ book at him. Perhaps they
should have given him pilot training, he may have ended up being a
valuable
asset.

JD




Actualy I was in the USMC at the time.... and having worked on A-4's this
story stuck in my memory at the time.

The "Offending" joy rider was a Flight Line Mechanic Sgt, who had hopes of
becoming an Attack or Fighter pilot
himself in the USMC, it seems he did have his own Private pilots license and
was into piloting Gliders also and had been
since he was about 16. Unfortuneatly he liked to soar the gliders to very
high altitudes, and on one flight he got an embolism in
one of his arms. Which disqualified him from ever becoming a pilot as far
as the USMC was concerned.

Since his dreams were dashed he decided to take a "joy ride" late one night
in an A-4M, after everyone had gone left the hangar.
He did a good job of take off and approach, but gave the aircraft a bit of a
hard landing at the end, but no major damage.

If I remember correctly, he did get a court martial, and was given 6 months
in the Brig, reduced in Rank and a General Discharge.
(His own commanding Officer asked the Court to NOT give him a Dishonorable
Discharge due to his outstanding record - except for this one blemish).

From what I understand he was just a guy who really, really loved to fly and
made one stupid mistake.
They should have made him sign up as a Cobra Pilot for 6 instead of booting
him out. - IMHO.


Helomech



  #7  
Old October 15th 05, 01:30 AM
Gord Beaman
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Posts: n/a
Default

"Rick" wrote:

There was an incident this past week where a Cessna Citation jet
disappeared from St. Augustine Airport, only to turn-up at an airport
outside Atlanta. Reports conflict as to whether the plane was damaged
in any way; certainly not seriously, at any rate.

We were talking about this ambitious joyride at work, and I remembered
a case in the eighties where a military technician, who I believe was
an accomplished glider pilot with a world altitude record, took an A-4
for a spin in the middle of the night -- perhaps over the holidays
while the field was closed. It might have been at El Toro.

Does anyone remember this? I promised a friend a link to this story if
I can find it.


Bit of a piker isn't he?...an A-4 you say?...do you remember the
technician (I think - at least a non pilot) who stole a C-130 in,
I think, merree ole Englande (again I think) got it started and
took off headed it West for the US. I think they caught up to him
well out to sea...dunno what became of him, I think he eventually
pranged it into the sea (ditched it)..
--

-Gord.
(use gordon in email)
  #8  
Old October 25th 05, 12:38 AM
Guest
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Default [Gord Beaman] 1980s: Technician goes joyriding in A-4 Skyhawk.

The LCpl to whom you are referring and asking about was LCpl Foote.
LCpl Foote was an Avi tech and was also an accomplished private pilot
and High Altitude glider pilot. LCpl Foote was disqualified from
flight training for more then just the embolism issue. LCpl Foote
worked night crew and decided to prove to the Marine Corps (as if the
Marine Corps was one single person) that he could indeed fly and that
any other physical issues were non-factors.

Foote took the A4 Skyhawk (Scooter) from the flight line at MCAS El
Toro (I forget the particular squadron) and was on his way to March
AFB. In route the acft lost elect power and Foote was forced to deploy
the acfts RAT or air driven generator. Foote returned to MCAS El Toro.
Foote had to circle the air station until the MPs were able to have
the airfield light turned on so that Foote could land.

At the time I was in training for a back seat license and was promptly
removed from further training. I had several hours of flight time in
the A4 then and it was going to be a Golden Op, but thanks to Mr. Foote
I never got that opportunity.

Some 20 years later I’m still here active duty in the Marines. I
have gotten stick time in most of our aircraft but never ballsie enough
to take one for a joy ride. Yes a private pilot but in today’s
climate one would find themselves a flaming ball of fire after said
acft was take. Funny how times change.

Master Sergeant of Marines
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Posted via MilitaryForums.com http://www.militaryforums.com^M
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