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Mild Aerobatics



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 11th 05, 04:17 PM
Jay Honeck
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Default Mild Aerobatics

During primary training, many moons ago, I was growing frustrated with the
sedate nature of our flying, so I asked my flight instructor (Bob -- a guy
with 20K hours in every known flying machine) when we were going to get to
the "fun stuff"? He didn't know what I was talking about, so I told him I
wanted to see what these things could actually *do*...

At which point he smiled that crooked smile of his, and proceeded to do a
wing-over with a recovery out the bottom, going the opposite direction! I
was whooping and hollering for more, but he just went back to our lesson for
the day....

Nowadays, Mary and I are very cautious in our Pathfinder, rarely exceeding
45 degree banks, and never pulling more than mild G turns. Mary hates steep
banks (except in a Super Decathlon -- then all bets are off!), and the most
rambunctious thing we ever do are "Up-Downs" (as the kids call them), which
is a firm pull up with a steady push-over at the top that induces negative
Gs in the back seat.

Just curious -- what do you guys do with your spam cans? I've seen video
from inside a Cessna that shows a guy doing some pretty radical maneuvers,
but in real life what's the most you push your aircraft?
--
Jay Honeck
Iowa City, IA
Pathfinder N56993
www.AlexisParkInn.com
"Your Aviation Destination"


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  #2  
Old August 11th 05, 04:21 PM
Mike Rapoport
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Default

My airplanes say that "no aerobatic manuevers, including spins, are
approved" so I don't do any aerobatic maneuvers or spins.

Mike
MU-2


"Jay Honeck" wrote in message
news[email protected]_s72...
During primary training, many moons ago, I was growing frustrated with the
sedate nature of our flying, so I asked my flight instructor (Bob -- a guy
with 20K hours in every known flying machine) when we were going to get to
the "fun stuff"? He didn't know what I was talking about, so I told him I
wanted to see what these things could actually *do*...

At which point he smiled that crooked smile of his, and proceeded to do a
wing-over with a recovery out the bottom, going the opposite direction!
I was whooping and hollering for more, but he just went back to our lesson
for the day....

Nowadays, Mary and I are very cautious in our Pathfinder, rarely exceeding
45 degree banks, and never pulling more than mild G turns. Mary hates
steep banks (except in a Super Decathlon -- then all bets are off!), and
the most rambunctious thing we ever do are "Up-Downs" (as the kids call
them), which is a firm pull up with a steady push-over at the top that
induces negative Gs in the back seat.

Just curious -- what do you guys do with your spam cans? I've seen video
from inside a Cessna that shows a guy doing some pretty radical maneuvers,
but in real life what's the most you push your aircraft?
--
Jay Honeck
Iowa City, IA
Pathfinder N56993
www.AlexisParkInn.com
"Your Aviation Destination"



  #3  
Old August 11th 05, 04:48 PM
three-eight-hotel
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Default

Steep turns here and there, and definitely the "tummy hills", which is
what "my" kids call them... ;-)

I'd like to break away and get the aerobatic endorsement at some point.
If for nothing else, to really know how to recover from some "truly"
unusual attitudes!

Best Regards,
Todd

  #4  
Old August 11th 05, 04:49 PM
Dudley Henriques
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Default

Hi Jay;

I realize that you are offering this question in the context of a "normal"
flight situation for the average safe pilot flying an average GA light
airplane safely, and considering that, I would say the following.
There are pilots out here who will "push" their normal/utility category GA
airplanes and those who won't. The smart ones don't "push" their airplanes
at all. The reason for this is that there are two factors involved. You have
a POH that offers you figures to follow that define your flight envelope,
then you have the reality involved with an aging airplane.
Considering both factors, it's simply smart flying to keep the "excursions"
from normal flight to an absolute minimum. This is not to say that the
airplane will fall apart on you if you do a little "not straight and level"
flying with it, but it does say that doing this in aging airplanes can
increase that aging process somewhat.
My advice as an aerobatic instructor to pilots flying light GA airplanes in
the normal category is simply to use their heads and don't stray too far
into "working" the airplane.
I always use a favorite analogy of mine when answering on this issue when
asked.
G........any g...on an airplane is cumulative. It can add up on you. If
someone gently poked their finger into your arm it wouldn't hurt very much
the first time they did it; but if they poked that finger into your arm at
exactly the same spot a hundred times in a row, that last time could hurt a
bunch :-)))
Bottom line for GA pilots wanting to "play" a bit..........fly the
book....and as the airplane ages.........ease off the airplane even a bit
more. Go rent the Decathlon and have some fun!!!!
Dudley



"Jay Honeck" wrote in message
news[email protected]_s72...
During primary training, many moons ago, I was growing frustrated with the
sedate nature of our flying, so I asked my flight instructor (Bob -- a guy
with 20K hours in every known flying machine) when we were going to get to
the "fun stuff"? He didn't know what I was talking about, so I told him I
wanted to see what these things could actually *do*...

At which point he smiled that crooked smile of his, and proceeded to do a
wing-over with a recovery out the bottom, going the opposite direction!
I was whooping and hollering for more, but he just went back to our lesson
for the day....

Nowadays, Mary and I are very cautious in our Pathfinder, rarely exceeding
45 degree banks, and never pulling more than mild G turns. Mary hates
steep banks (except in a Super Decathlon -- then all bets are off!), and
the most rambunctious thing we ever do are "Up-Downs" (as the kids call
them), which is a firm pull up with a steady push-over at the top that
induces negative Gs in the back seat.

Just curious -- what do you guys do with your spam cans? I've seen video
from inside a Cessna that shows a guy doing some pretty radical maneuvers,
but in real life what's the most you push your aircraft?
--
Jay Honeck
Iowa City, IA
Pathfinder N56993
www.AlexisParkInn.com
"Your Aviation Destination"



  #5  
Old August 11th 05, 04:51 PM
Guy Elden Jr
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Posts: n/a
Default

Well it wasn't for fun, but while flying with my old instructor a
couple years ago on a night x-country he suddenly grabbed the controls
from me, rolled into a 45 degree bank, and pushed the nose down HARD to
avoid what appeared to be an imminent head-on mid-air. Definitely took
a flight within the plane for a couple of seconds during that maneuver,
but we cleared the traffic with no problem. (It probably wasn't all
that close actually, but when you see red on right, a white light, and
no movement, you get the hell outta the way).

--
Guy Elden Jr.

  #6  
Old August 11th 05, 05:03 PM
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
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Posts: n/a
Default

Jay Honeck wrote:
Just curious -- what do you guys do with your spam cans? I've seen video
from inside a Cessna that shows a guy doing some pretty radical maneuvers,
but in real life what's the most you push your aircraft?



Chandelles in the C-172 and PA-28R-201. I've spun C-150s / 152s / 172s. I've
crashed C-210 / PA323R-300.



--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

VE


  #7  
Old August 11th 05, 05:10 PM
Jim Burns
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Posts: n/a
Default

Steep banks are about it. More than anything I practice the normal
"precision" maneuvers, practicing smoothness and fluidity. The commercial
maneuvers really aren't aerobatics, but I practice them just to see how bad
I can screw up a Lazy 8. Chandelles are fun and take some work to do
correctly, mostly a planning maneuver.

Nick and I went out for a bit last night, he wanted to fly over the house so
I did some clearing turns and a few 60 degree banks. He thought it was
cool. That big ole Aztec just rolls into and out of those banks sooooo
sweet, and with just the right touch on the throttles holds the altitude
perfectly.

I have seen some amazing things done with Aztecs though, nothing I'd ever
recommend or try, especially in a twin. There is a company in ND that uses
them for crop dusting (more government contract bug work than anything)
really some cranking and banking.

Jim


  #8  
Old August 11th 05, 05:11 PM
Frank Stutzman
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Default

My plane is 54 years old. Other than the occaisonal 2 G turn, I don't do
anything vaguely aerobatic with it. Heck, I'm somewhat embarrased that I
can't even remember the last time I did an accellerated stall in it.

Not that knowing how to do some simple maneuvers isn't useful. My
primary flight instructer was once rolled 150 degrees or so due to wake
turbulence. Even though he was at about a thousand feet, he had the
sense enough to contine the roll all the way around. Don't know if I
would have been so quick witted.

--
Frank Stutzman
Bonanza N494B "Hula Girl"
Hood River, OR

  #9  
Old August 11th 05, 05:15 PM
Rod
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Posts: n/a
Default

Why not practice some of the commercial pilot maneuvers? Lazy eights are
nowhere near aerobatics but they will make you be precise. Eights on pylons
will get you comfortable with steep banks near the ground.

Rod

Just curious -- what do you guys do with your spam cans? I've seen video
from inside a Cessna that shows a guy doing some pretty radical maneuvers,
but in real life what's the most you push your aircraft?
--



  #10  
Old August 11th 05, 05:17 PM
Maule Driver
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Posts: n/a
Default

Well, my favorite eye-opener for select passengers is a lazy eight.
It's a non-aerobatic manuever but it looks and feels like one to the
unitiated - especially when done sloppily. A turn in a lazy eight feels
like a wing-over and is probably quite close to what Bob did.

I'm not sure of the technical description for a wingover but if you keep
the pitch and bank under 45 I guess it's technically non-acro(?). You
don't even have to get close to those figures to get the desired effect.

I've had the benefit of formal acro training (gliders) and lot's of
informal practice (gliders). Stall turns and wingovers (whatever they
are) can get dangerous so it's nothing to play with without instruction.
But non-acro 'wingovers' and lazy eights are easy and fun as long as
know where the limits are.

Now if I can just get my hands on that clown that snapped a C150 on me
during my pre-solo....

Jay Honeck wrote:
During primary training, many moons ago, I was growing frustrated with the
sedate nature of our flying, so I asked my flight instructor (Bob -- a guy
with 20K hours in every known flying machine) when we were going to get to
the "fun stuff"? He didn't know what I was talking about, so I told him I
wanted to see what these things could actually *do*...

At which point he smiled that crooked smile of his, and proceeded to do a
wing-over with a recovery out the bottom, going the opposite direction! I
was whooping and hollering for more, but he just went back to our lesson for
the day....

Nowadays, Mary and I are very cautious in our Pathfinder, rarely exceeding
45 degree banks, and never pulling more than mild G turns. Mary hates steep
banks (except in a Super Decathlon -- then all bets are off!), and the most
rambunctious thing we ever do are "Up-Downs" (as the kids call them), which
is a firm pull up with a steady push-over at the top that induces negative
Gs in the back seat.

Just curious -- what do you guys do with your spam cans? I've seen video
from inside a Cessna that shows a guy doing some pretty radical maneuvers,
but in real life what's the most you push your aircraft?

 




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