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First glider Nimbus 2 ?



 
 
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  #11  
Old March 13th 15, 02:22 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Tim Taylor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 746
Default First glider Nimbus 2 ?

On Thursday, March 12, 2015 at 9:11:44 PM UTC-6, Surge wrote:
A Nimbus 2 is on the market which I'm interested in as my first glider and I'd like some feedback from those who've owned or flown one.


I had about 500 hours in a Std. Cirrus before transitioning to the N2A. As a first personal glider I would not recommend it mostly from the aspect of learning cross country. Your first personal glider should be something you are not afraid to put in any field. The N2A will limit that because it is a big ship with more mass and less maneuverability. Also, you will need a crew of at least two to come get you.

The tail chute is usually disabled because of the danger of inadvertently opening when you don't want it to. I took mine out and sealed the compartment with tape. The airbrakes are adequate and coupled with the flaps are enough for glide path control.

The biggest issue is everything happens fast on take off and landing in the bigger glider, not what you want on your first ten or so off-field landings. The slower handling and higher l/d make judgment and correction harder and slower right when you need them.

The all flying tail takes getting used to and is mostly a matter of having less feedback than other gliders. Once you get used to it is not an issue but there is a learning curve and newer pilots tend to PIO on early take-offs. It is also not stable in flight so you can't take your hands off the stick and must brace your arm at higher speeds.

It requires negative flaps at the beginning of the take-off and end of landing so you have to be well ahead of the glider to be able to adjust the flaps during the initial roll and landing roll.

With the large mass the wheel brake needs to be adjusted well and sanded often and will still be lacking in stopping power most of the time.

I enjoyed my N2A but also realized it limited my soaring options at times. Overall it flies well and is a fun glider once you have time to get used to it. It works well over flat terrain but is limited close to the mountains due to the slower handling.

For the same price range an early standard class ship or LS-3 would be a better option for the first personal glider to learn xc in.

As always, I recommend talking with a good instructor with cross country experience that knows your capabilities.
Ads
  #12  
Old March 13th 15, 03:41 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Gliding Guru
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10
Default First glider Nimbus 2 ?

I think bang for bucks you probably won't be able to find cheaper. And with
a bit of water it should go you the same ave speeds as an Asw 20. And with
a few extra litres the 27 pilots won't be leaving you that quick.

I would still recommend an Asw 20 if you are starting out and you can
afford it, but then I think that you may only be paying half the price for
the nimbus. Every buck counted when I started so I flew the cheaper
underestimated and unloved aircraft and still had as much fun as anyone
else.

You won't have many friends if you rig and de-rig too often so try to keep
it in a hanger.

Also I know of at least one nimbus 2 that was written off by the tail chute
popping inadvertently in the air. The pilot was not able to reach the
airport. But if you are flying somewhere like South Africa where the fields
are big you don't need the chute anyway.

The one thing that I have noted with these older aircraft is that the mylar
was either not put on correctly in the first place or is in the process of
failing off. If it's not perfect then rip it off. Put the Tessa tap in its
place and you 99% as good as a well sealed machine anyway.





i Mate,
I have owned my N2 for 18 months now, I guess I have put about 100hrs o
it and flown two comps. The sailplane I owned before this one was
Phoebus C. I did a huge amount of research before I bought mine and th
most important advice I got from one of our gliding gods was.

It's a gentleman's conveyance , don't fly stupid speeds and you wil
catch the gaggle at half climb and leave before them.

My recommendation is to go out and buy it ASAP.

Cheap 18m performance for 20k
Schempp hirth quality
It will fly with a ASW20 LS8 all day as long as you don't go too fast
It will go like a scalded cat if you fill the water tanks. It's a littl
bit intimidating if you fly it way over gross weight ""I have heard"
The cockpit is huge and comfortable
It's easy to rig by yourself if you have a good single man rigger
You can fit and carry the tips easily by yourself
It's LD will get you home most days
it has a all flying tail plane for less maintenance
You have to think about the launch if you haven't flown flaps before
1 make sure it's lined up properly
2 start off in full negative flap
3 as soon as you have roll control move to positive flap
4 the tail will fly when ready, the book says start with full forward o
back but I tend to trim it so that its neutral.
People will run off if they see you starting to rig but I can do it o
my own in about an hour if left alone.
The all flying tail plane is a non event, I can fly mine hands off fo
enough time to get a uridome on, it does get twitchy at 120kts but ho
often do you really fly at those speeds. I have flown the asw15/Phoebu
and the nimbus is easier to fly.
Thermaling is a breeze, I have head all these stories about its hard t
turn, yes sometimes you have full rudder and notice it but these ar
sailplanes not Pitts specials.
The hoteliers are a little painful if it doesn't have the access hatch
if it doesn't the secret is to put your head in the hole and put th
safety's in by putting your arm through the steel structure area.

I haven't outlandend mine yet but whilst the airbrakes aren't supe
powerful you can always hit your touch down point with ease.

My advice is to buy it and only take advice from those who have flow
one and have opinions other than ones borne from the web.

I am an instructor and would happily send a pilot out in it as Lang a
the had the correct mindset and a good cross country ability. As a roug
guess 50-70 hrs with good single seat time. I think sometimes peopl
forget that the legends of our sport flee these things 40 years ago an
whilst they will never be as nice as a JS1 or ASG29 you aren't payin
$200 k either.

My email is justinjsinclair the usual symbol hotmail.com if you wan
pics or furrier info

Justin

Surge;898749 Wrote:
A Nimbus 2 is on the market which I'm interested in as my first glide
and I'd like some feedback from those who've owned or flown one.

I do realize that a flapped, long winged glider is not the best choic
for a low time pilot which is why I will keep the glider in a hanga
while I first build up some experience on Grob G102's. My motivation fo
purchase is because I think the glider matches my checklist for the typ
of flying I've always wished to do and also because of the opportunit
presented which may not come around again. Due to the fact that glider
take ages to sell where I live (slow market), I'd rather purchas
something I want to fly for the next 20 years than purchase a
intermediate "first glider" that I battle to sell later. There is enoug
G102 stock available to hire in the transition phase.

My aim in soaring has always been to do medium distance (300-500km)
relaxed, cross country flying (armchair ride) so with regards t
performance and bang-for-buck it ticks the boxes. I am not interested i
competition flying.. I'd much rather cruise around at 160km/h with a
L/D of ~40:1 than blast around at 200+ km/h trying to shave preciou
seconds off a task.
I'd like to know more about the glider's vices or problem areas I nee
to be aware of.

1. Stall/spin characteristics. How much warning does it give befor
stalling and does it have any tendency to suddenly drop a wing and spi
or can it be considered as one of the docile gliders in the stall/spi
category? If it constantly wants to kill me (a pilot issue) I'd rathe
stay with an Astir and just limit my cross country range.

2. Pitch sensitivity. The glider has an all flying tail (not a 2B or 2
model). How pitch sensitive is it once trimmed in cruise? Is i
twitchy/unstable and need constant attention or is it fairly stable an
one doesn't have to constantly fight to keep attitude constant?

3. Approach control. How effective are the airbrakes? Are outlandings
challenge with the tail chute? Where I fly there are usually plenty o
plowed fields at least 300m long and fairly wide (apparently guarded b
farmers with shotguns).

Areas I'm aware of:
- Pitch is sensitive which evidently makes tugging a bit trickier.
- Long wings and cross winds don't play nicely together on takeoff.
- Don't go full positive flap on takeoff as the wing may fly before th
tail! :-O
- Roll rate is not snappy and the glider is a bit under ruddered whic
makes entering thermals a bit more challenging than most 15m ships.
- Long wings and mediocre airbrakes (compared to Astirs) make ou
landings more challenging/dangerous.
- Heavy wings are not an issue as the glider will be hangared and flow
conservatively cross country. The odd retrieve shouldn't be a reason t
not fly such an awesome old lady.
- The glider comes with a decent trailer and accessories before someon
brings that up.
- All AD's including tail AD applied





--
Skypilot


  #13  
Old March 13th 15, 04:27 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Jonathan St. Cloud
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,442
Default First glider Nimbus 2 ?

Dear Surge:

A G102. will not give you the skills needed to fly the N2. You must get as much Janus time as possible. I have lots of all flying tail experience and while you get used to it, I would never have such a glider again as a bump can cause +3 -3 G PIO's. I think a much better choice would be an early std class. An easier to assemble, fly and land glider will mean you fly more!!!!! Second, there is no relaxed (armchair ride) cross country of any length. Sure some are faster and more intense, but you much always be many steps ahead and always be within gliding range of a suitable landing place.

On Thursday, March 12, 2015 at 8:11:44 PM UTC-7, Surge wrote:
A Nimbus 2 is on the market which I'm interested in as my first glider and I'd like some feedback from those who've owned or flown one.

I do realize that a flapped, long winged glider is not the best choice for a low time pilot which is why I will keep the glider in a hangar while I first build up some experience on Grob G102's. My motivation for purchase is because I think the glider matches my checklist for the type of flying I've always wished to do and also because of the opportunity presented which may not come around again. Due to the fact that gliders take ages to sell where I live (slow market), I'd rather purchase something I want to fly for the next 20 years than purchase an intermediate "first glider" that I battle to sell later. There is enough G102 stock available to hire in the transition phase.

My aim in soaring has always been to do medium distance (300-500km), relaxed, cross country flying (armchair ride) so with regards to performance and bang-for-buck it ticks the boxes. I am not interested in competition flying. I'd much rather cruise around at 160km/h with an L/D of ~40:1 than blast around at 200+ km/h trying to shave precious seconds off a task.
I'd like to know more about the glider's vices or problem areas I need to be aware of.

1. Stall/spin characteristics. How much warning does it give before stalling and does it have any tendency to suddenly drop a wing and spin or can it be considered as one of the docile gliders in the stall/spin category? If it constantly wants to kill me (a pilot issue) I'd rather stay with an Astir and just limit my cross country range.

2. Pitch sensitivity. The glider has an all flying tail (not a 2B or 2C model). How pitch sensitive is it once trimmed in cruise? Is it twitchy/unstable and need constant attention or is it fairly stable and one doesn't have to constantly fight to keep attitude constant?

3. Approach control. How effective are the airbrakes? Are outlandings a challenge with the tail chute? Where I fly there are usually plenty of plowed fields at least 300m long and fairly wide (apparently guarded by farmers with shotguns).

Areas I'm aware of:
- Pitch is sensitive which evidently makes tugging a bit trickier.
- Long wings and cross winds don't play nicely together on takeoff.
- Don't go full positive flap on takeoff as the wing may fly before the tail! :-O
- Roll rate is not snappy and the glider is a bit under ruddered which makes entering thermals a bit more challenging than most 15m ships.
- Long wings and mediocre airbrakes (compared to Astirs) make out landings more challenging/dangerous.
- Heavy wings are not an issue as the glider will be hangared and flown conservatively cross country. The odd retrieve shouldn't be a reason to not fly such an awesome old lady.
- The glider comes with a decent trailer and accessories before someone brings that up.
- All AD's including tail AD applied.

  #14  
Old March 13th 15, 05:12 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Julian Rees
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default First glider Nimbus 2 ?

Hi Surge

Having flown a Nimbus 2B and a good range of other types I would not
recommend a Nimbus 2 / 2B to a low hours glider pilot unless he had a lot
of other handling experience (for example as a fast jet or aerobatic
pilot). The all flying tail is not very stable in pitch and the airbrakes
are rather weak (there is a mod which will double paddle them but even then
they are adequate rather than great).

Like most gliders of this generation it will spin if provoked, but the
behavior is dependent on the CofG position - with an aft CofG they drop a
wing quite easily and are definitely not as docile as the more modern
types.

The Nimbus 2C is better in some respects (fixed tail and trailing edge
brakes) but most open class gliders are not ideal for low-hours pilots (you
dont say your hours but I assume that is the case). The exception IMHO is
the Open Cirrus which is relatively straightforward.

Of course with a few hundred hours under your belt on other types (such as
std cirrus or Janus) things would be different.

I would recommend an LS4 if you can afford it, or ASW19/20 as a slightly
cheaper option, or maybe a DG200/202 or DG101 or DG300. Any of these is
good for 300-500km flights given reasonable conditions and will be easier
to handle, thermal, and land (out or away).

Best advice as always is talk to you CFI - assuming they have a good range
of experience and types in the book

Of course this is only my opinion but hope it helps !


On Thursday, March 12, 2015 at 8:11:44 PM UTC-7, Surge wrote:
A Nimbus 2 is on the market which I'm interested in as my first glider

an=
d I'd like some feedback from those who've owned or flown one.
=20
I do realize that a flapped, long winged glider is not the best choice

fo=
r a low time pilot which is why I will keep the glider in a hangar while

I
=
first build up some experience on Grob G102's. My motivation for purchase
i=
s because I think the glider matches my checklist for the type of flying
I'=
ve always wished to do and also because of the opportunity presented

which
=
may not come around again. Due to the fact that gliders take ages to sell
w=
here I live (slow market), I'd rather purchase something I want to fly

for
=
the next 20 years than purchase an intermediate "first glider" that I
battl=
e to sell later. There is enough G102 stock available to hire in the
transi=
tion phase.
=20
My aim in soaring has always been to do medium distance (300-500km),

rela=
xed, cross country flying (armchair ride) so with regards to performance
an=
d bang-for-buck it ticks the boxes. I am not interested in competition
flyi=
ng. I'd much rather cruise around at 160km/h with an L/D of ~40:1 than
blas=
t around at 200+ km/h trying to shave precious seconds off a task.=20
I'd like to know more about the glider's vices or problem areas I need

to=
be aware of.
=20
1. Stall/spin characteristics. How much warning does it give before

stall=
ing and does it have any tendency to suddenly drop a wing and spin or can
i=
t be considered as one of the docile gliders in the stall/spin category?
If=
it constantly wants to kill me (a pilot issue) I'd rather stay with an
Ast=
ir and just limit my cross country range.
=20
2. Pitch sensitivity. The glider has an all flying tail (not a 2B or 2C

m=
odel). How pitch sensitive is it once trimmed in cruise? Is it
twitchy/unst=
able and need constant attention or is it fairly stable and one doesn't
hav=
e to constantly fight to keep attitude constant?
=20
3. Approach control. How effective are the airbrakes? Are outlandings a

c=
hallenge with the tail chute? Where I fly there are usually plenty of
plowe=
d fields at least 300m long and fairly wide (apparently guarded by

farmers
=
with shotguns).
=20
Areas I'm aware of:
- Pitch is sensitive which evidently makes tugging a bit trickier.
- Long wings and cross winds don't play nicely together on takeoff.
- Don't go full positive flap on takeoff as the wing may fly before the

t=
ail! :-O
- Roll rate is not snappy and the glider is a bit under ruddered which

ma=
kes entering thermals a bit more challenging than most 15m ships.
- Long wings and mediocre airbrakes (compared to Astirs) make out

landing=
s more challenging/dangerous.
- Heavy wings are not an issue as the glider will be hangared and flown

c=
onservatively cross country. The odd retrieve shouldn't be a reason to

not
=
fly such an awesome old lady.
- The glider comes with a decent trailer and accessories before someone

b=
rings that up.
- All AD's including tail AD applied.



  #15  
Old March 13th 15, 07:24 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Jonathan St. Cloud
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,442
Default First glider Nimbus 2 ?

I think Jules 970 is right on point. And I can not stress enough, that if you get this Nimbus2 you will do much less flying than if you get one of the gliders mentioned below. If you are flying XC you want a glider that is comfortable and easy to handle, what if you are low and have to bend around a small thermal, you want a glider that is easy to fly, you will build more confidence, you will want to fly it more and friends will help you assemble the glider. If you get a machine like this you are more likely to not be confident for many hours, it might scare you enough that you do not fly...... Good luck and stay safe.

On Friday, March 13, 2015 at 9:15:04 AM UTC-7, Jules 970 wrote:
Hi Surge

Having flown a Nimbus 2B and a good range of other types I would not
recommend a Nimbus 2 / 2B to a low hours glider pilot unless he had a lot
of other handling experience (for example as a fast jet or aerobatic
pilot). The all flying tail is not very stable in pitch and the airbrakes
are rather weak (there is a mod which will double paddle them but even then
they are adequate rather than great).

Like most gliders of this generation it will spin if provoked, but the
behavior is dependent on the CofG position - with an aft CofG they drop a
wing quite easily and are definitely not as docile as the more modern
types.

The Nimbus 2C is better in some respects (fixed tail and trailing edge
brakes) but most open class gliders are not ideal for low-hours pilots (you
dont say your hours but I assume that is the case). The exception IMHO is
the Open Cirrus which is relatively straightforward.

Of course with a few hundred hours under your belt on other types (such as
std cirrus or Janus) things would be different.

I would recommend an LS4 if you can afford it, or ASW19/20 as a slightly
cheaper option, or maybe a DG200/202 or DG101 or DG300. Any of these is
good for 300-500km flights given reasonable conditions and will be easier
to handle, thermal, and land (out or away).

Best advice as always is talk to you CFI - assuming they have a good range
of experience and types in the book

Of course this is only my opinion but hope it helps !


On Thursday, March 12, 2015 at 8:11:44 PM UTC-7, Surge wrote:
A Nimbus 2 is on the market which I'm interested in as my first glider

an=
d I'd like some feedback from those who've owned or flown one.
=20
I do realize that a flapped, long winged glider is not the best choice

fo=
r a low time pilot which is why I will keep the glider in a hangar while

I
=
first build up some experience on Grob G102's. My motivation for purchase
i=
s because I think the glider matches my checklist for the type of flying
I'=
ve always wished to do and also because of the opportunity presented

which
=
may not come around again. Due to the fact that gliders take ages to sell
w=
here I live (slow market), I'd rather purchase something I want to fly

for
=
the next 20 years than purchase an intermediate "first glider" that I
battl=
e to sell later. There is enough G102 stock available to hire in the
transi=
tion phase.
=20
My aim in soaring has always been to do medium distance (300-500km),

rela=
xed, cross country flying (armchair ride) so with regards to performance
an=
d bang-for-buck it ticks the boxes. I am not interested in competition
flyi=
ng. I'd much rather cruise around at 160km/h with an L/D of ~40:1 than
blas=
t around at 200+ km/h trying to shave precious seconds off a task.=20
I'd like to know more about the glider's vices or problem areas I need

to=
be aware of.
=20
1. Stall/spin characteristics. How much warning does it give before

stall=
ing and does it have any tendency to suddenly drop a wing and spin or can
i=
t be considered as one of the docile gliders in the stall/spin category?
If=
it constantly wants to kill me (a pilot issue) I'd rather stay with an
Ast=
ir and just limit my cross country range.
=20
2. Pitch sensitivity. The glider has an all flying tail (not a 2B or 2C

m=
odel). How pitch sensitive is it once trimmed in cruise? Is it
twitchy/unst=
able and need constant attention or is it fairly stable and one doesn't
hav=
e to constantly fight to keep attitude constant?
=20
3. Approach control. How effective are the airbrakes? Are outlandings a

c=
hallenge with the tail chute? Where I fly there are usually plenty of
plowe=
d fields at least 300m long and fairly wide (apparently guarded by

farmers
=
with shotguns).
=20
Areas I'm aware of:
- Pitch is sensitive which evidently makes tugging a bit trickier.
- Long wings and cross winds don't play nicely together on takeoff.
- Don't go full positive flap on takeoff as the wing may fly before the

t=
ail! :-O
- Roll rate is not snappy and the glider is a bit under ruddered which

ma=
kes entering thermals a bit more challenging than most 15m ships.
- Long wings and mediocre airbrakes (compared to Astirs) make out

landing=
s more challenging/dangerous.
- Heavy wings are not an issue as the glider will be hangared and flown

c=
onservatively cross country. The odd retrieve shouldn't be a reason to

not
=
fly such an awesome old lady.
- The glider comes with a decent trailer and accessories before someone

b=
rings that up.
- All AD's including tail AD applied.



  #16  
Old March 13th 15, 08:30 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
John Galloway[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 215
Default First glider Nimbus 2 ?

It might be a good idea to find a copy of Dick Johnson's flight test of
the original Nimbus 2 published in Soaring magazine. Unfortunately
it is omitted from the web.archive.org list of Dick Johnson articles.
He describes getting into into a very bad situation with an
uncontrollable pitch up on an autotow launch. He advised "I do not
recommend that pilots with less than several hundred recent flying
hours fly this beautiful but complex machine, particularly from
ground tow".

BTW I used to own a carbon Nimbus 2c which I regard as a totally
different proposition - a big pussy cat. Lighter yet takes loads of
water (which it needs) with a 650kg MAUW compared with 580 for
the N2. Non-droopy carbon wings. Stable pitch control with a
conventional tailplane. Superb trailing edge airbrakes (that don't
increase the stalling speed) and a slow landing speed that make it a
very easy outlanding glider.

John Galloway


At 18:24 13 March 2015, Jonathan St. Cloud wrote:
I think Jules 970 is right on point. And I can not stress enough,

that if
y=
ou get this Nimbus2 you will do much less flying than if you get

one of
th=
e gliders mentioned below. If you are flying XC you want a glider

that is
=
comfortable and easy to handle, what if you are low and have to

bend
around=
a small thermal, you want a glider that is easy to fly, you will

build
mor=
e confidence, you will want to fly it more and friends will help you
assemb=
le the glider. If you get a machine like this you are more likely to

not
b=
e confident for many hours, it might scare you enough that you do

not
fly..=
.... Good luck and stay safe.

On Friday, March 13, 2015 at 9:15:04 AM UTC-7, Jules 970 wrote:
Hi Surge
=20
Having flown a Nimbus 2B and a good range of other types I

would not
recommend a Nimbus 2 / 2B to a low hours glider pilot unless he

had a lot
of other handling experience (for example as a fast jet or

aerobatic
pilot). The all flying tail is not very stable in pitch and the

airbrakes
are rather weak (there is a mod which will double paddle them

but even
th=
en
they are adequate rather than great).=20
=20
Like most gliders of this generation it will spin if provoked, but

the
behavior is dependent on the CofG position - with an aft CofG

they drop a
wing quite easily and are definitely not as docile as the more

modern
types.
=20
The Nimbus 2C is better in some respects (fixed tail and trailing

edge
brakes) but most open class gliders are not ideal for low-hours

pilots
(y=
ou
dont say your hours but I assume that is the case). The

exception IMHO is
the Open Cirrus which is relatively straightforward.
=20
Of course with a few hundred hours under your belt on other

types (such
a=
s
std cirrus or Janus) things would be different.
=20
I would recommend an LS4 if you can afford it, or ASW19/20 as

a slightly
cheaper option, or maybe a DG200/202 or DG101 or DG300.

Any of these is
good for 300-500km flights given reasonable conditions and will

be easier
to handle, thermal, and land (out or away).
=20
Best advice as always is talk to you CFI - assuming they have a

good
rang=
e
of experience and types in the book
=20
Of course this is only my opinion but hope it helps !
=20

On Thursday, March 12, 2015 at 8:11:44 PM UTC-7, Surge

wrote:
A Nimbus 2 is on the market which I'm interested in as my

first glider
an=3D
d I'd like some feedback from those who've owned or flown

one.
=3D20
I do realize that a flapped, long winged glider is not the best

choice
fo=3D
r a low time pilot which is why I will keep the glider in a hangar

while
I
=3D
first build up some experience on Grob G102's. My motivation

for
purchas=
e
i=3D
s because I think the glider matches my checklist for the type

of flying
I'=3D
ve always wished to do and also because of the opportunity

presented
which
=3D
may not come around again. Due to the fact that gliders take

ages to
sel=
l
w=3D
here I live (slow market), I'd rather purchase something I want

to fly
for
=3D
the next 20 years than purchase an intermediate "first glider"

that I
battl=3D
e to sell later. There is enough G102 stock available to hire in

the
transi=3D
tion phase.
=3D20
My aim in soaring has always been to do medium distance

(300-500km),
rela=3D
xed, cross country flying (armchair ride) so with regards to

performance
an=3D
d bang-for-buck it ticks the boxes. I am not interested in

competition
flyi=3D
ng. I'd much rather cruise around at 160km/h with an L/D of

~40:1 than
blas=3D
t around at 200+ km/h trying to shave precious seconds off a

task.=3D20
I'd like to know more about the glider's vices or problem

areas I need
to=3D
be aware of.
=3D20
1. Stall/spin characteristics. How much warning does it give

before
stall=3D
ing and does it have any tendency to suddenly drop a wing and

spin or
ca=
n
i=3D
t be considered as one of the docile gliders in the stall/spin

category?
If=3D
it constantly wants to kill me (a pilot issue) I'd rather stay

with an
Ast=3D
ir and just limit my cross country range.
=3D20
2. Pitch sensitivity. The glider has an all flying tail (not a 2B

or
2=
C
m=3D
odel). How pitch sensitive is it once trimmed in cruise? Is it
twitchy/unst=3D
able and need constant attention or is it fairly stable and one

doesn't
hav=3D
e to constantly fight to keep attitude constant?
=3D20
3. Approach control. How effective are the airbrakes? Are

outlandings
=
a
c=3D
hallenge with the tail chute? Where I fly there are usually

plenty of
plowe=3D
d fields at least 300m long and fairly wide (apparently guarded

by
farmers
=3D
with shotguns).
=3D20
Areas I'm aware of:
- Pitch is sensitive which evidently makes tugging a bit

trickier.
- Long wings and cross winds don't play nicely together on

takeoff.
- Don't go full positive flap on takeoff as the wing may fly

before
th=
e
t=3D
ail! :-O
- Roll rate is not snappy and the glider is a bit under

ruddered which
ma=3D
kes entering thermals a bit more challenging than most 15m

ships.
- Long wings and mediocre airbrakes (compared to Astirs)

make out
landing=3D
s more challenging/dangerous.
- Heavy wings are not an issue as the glider will be hangared

and
flow=
n
c=3D
onservatively cross country. The odd retrieve shouldn't be a

reason to
not
=3D
fly such an awesome old lady.
- The glider comes with a decent trailer and accessories

before
someon=
e
b=3D
rings that up.
- All AD's including tail AD applied.




  #17  
Old March 13th 15, 09:23 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
JS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,384
Default First glider Nimbus 2 ?

Like Bruce and a few others, I don't condemn the N2A.
In my opinion, initially flying it with a forward C/G is best.
With about 100 hours my first N2A flight, at around the aft limit, took a few "interesting" seconds to get used to. Since then, enjoyed flights in properly ballasted N2s.
Justin might know the one I flew in Queensland, VH-GAW "Alice in Wonderland".
Jim
  #18  
Old March 14th 15, 10:28 PM
Skypilot Skypilot is offline
Member
 
First recorded activity by AviationBanter: Feb 2012
Posts: 31
Default

Hi Jim, yep she is still here, I think it's for sale at the moment. There are some details here.

http://www.hart.wattle.id.au/alice/articles.html

To be honest I belive if you can fly a cirrus, asw15. Astir you can fly a N2. Yes it's big but the what height and learning time is for. Are we really heading for a generation of pilots who don't want to fly stuff based on old stories and poor recollection of history. When Dick wrote that article there was the asw17 and N2 they were two years old and way ahead of anything else. I wonder what he would think of the Dianna or Duckhawk.

I any case my N2 to fly is available if you want to pay the $200 Excess insurance fee, It's at Kingaroy, arguably on of the fastest clubs in the world with no real wave and all done on thermals, hire charges for my glider are in Australian mates rates currency. I have a spare room in Brisbane and can organise transport. The CFI is very friendly (me ).

Quote:
Originally Posted by JS View Post
Like Bruce and a few others, I don't condemn the N2A.
In my opinion, initially flying it with a forward C/G is best.
With about 100 hours my first N2A flight, at around the aft limit, took a few "interesting" seconds to get used to. Since then, enjoyed flights in properly ballasted N2s.
Justin might know the one I flew in Queensland, VH-GAW "Alice in Wonderland".
Jim
  #19  
Old March 15th 15, 03:15 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19
Default First glider Nimbus 2 ?

On Friday, March 13, 2015 at 12:45:04 PM UTC-7, John Galloway wrote:
It might be a good idea to find a copy of Dick Johnson's flight test of
the original Nimbus 2 published in Soaring magazine. Unfortunately
it is omitted from the web.archive.org list of Dick Johnson articles.
He describes getting into into a very bad situation with an
uncontrollable pitch up on an autotow launch. He advised "I do not
recommend that pilots with less than several hundred recent flying
hours fly this beautiful but complex machine, particularly from
ground tow".


SSA members can access the Johnson review of the Nimbus II in the April, 1976 issue through the Soaring Magazine Archive.
  #20  
Old March 15th 15, 03:21 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Papa3[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 745
Default First glider Nimbus 2 ?

On Thursday, March 12, 2015 at 11:11:44 PM UTC-4, Surge wrote:

My aim in soaring has always been to do medium distance (300-500km), relaxed, cross country flying (armchair ride) so with regards to performance and bang-for-buck it ticks the boxes. I am not interested in competition flying. I'd much rather cruise around at 160km/h with an L/D of ~40:1 than blast around at 200+ km/h trying to shave precious seconds off a task.


Something to consider... Long-winged gliders do present some challenges when it comes time to land off-field. It depends on where you live. The huge, flat fields of the US central plains are much more forgiving than the broken field flying we sometimes do in the Appalachian ridges. I am much more aware of narrow or rolling fields flying my 18M ASG-29 than I was flying the LS8 and LS4 that preceded it. Just another item to factor into your decision.

P3
 




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