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FS2004, have you "looped the 747"?



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 8th 04, 05:19 AM
John Doe
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Default FS2004, have you "looped the 747"?

Reading. Microsoft mentions "looping the 747".

I have looped the LearJet in Flight Unlimited III but doubt I could ever
loop a 747.

Just curious.
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  #2  
Old March 8th 04, 06:01 AM
John Doe
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I wrote:

I have looped the LearJet in Flight Unlimited III but doubt I could ever
loop a 747.


Sorry, I was thinking "roll" instead of loop.

I guess that falls under similar enough subject matter.
  #3  
Old March 8th 04, 06:02 AM
John Hall
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You would probably have to put it into a shallow dive to build up some speed
and then just crank the yoke back and wait.

JK

"John Doe" wrote in message
...
Reading. Microsoft mentions "looping the 747".

I have looped the LearJet in Flight Unlimited III but doubt I could ever
loop a 747.

Just curious.



  #4  
Old March 8th 04, 09:33 AM
Quilljar
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I think it is true to say that it is possible to 'roll' any aircraft.
Because if done properly, there should be no more than a very slight extra
strain on the airframe. 'Looping' a 747 is another matter entirely! You have
to pull a lot of G in a loop... I would, perhaps, be prepared to risk it in
a Flight Simulator though, providing I had a stiff whisky and a sandwich by
my side, and a couple of attractive (non PC) nurses to fan my brow
afterwards :-)


  #5  
Old March 8th 04, 09:54 PM
Peter Duniho
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"Quilljar" wrote in message
...
I think it is true to say that it is possible to 'roll' any aircraft.
Because if done properly, there should be no more than a very slight extra
strain on the airframe.


Depends on the kind of roll. But yes, it is theoretically possible to
maintain low G forces throughout an entire roll. Witness the 707 prototype
that was rolled over Lake Washington back in the 60's.

Not all rolls have this characteristic though.

Pete


  #6  
Old March 9th 04, 05:09 AM
Jim Baker
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Default


"Peter Duniho" wrote in message
...
"Quilljar" wrote in message
...
I think it is true to say that it is possible to 'roll' any aircraft.
Because if done properly, there should be no more than a very slight

extra
strain on the airframe.


Depends on the kind of roll. But yes, it is theoretically possible to
maintain low G forces throughout an entire roll. Witness the 707

prototype
that was rolled over Lake Washington back in the 60's.

Not all rolls have this characteristic though.

Pete

Exactly. You're not going to aileron roll any large civil aircraft but
barrel rolls...possibly.

JB


  #7  
Old March 9th 04, 11:06 AM
Randy Wentzel
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Quilljar wrote:

I think it is true to say that it is possible to 'roll' any aircraft.
Because if done properly, there should be no more than a very slight extra
strain on the airframe. 'Looping' a 747 is another matter entirely! You have
to pull a lot of G in a loop... I would, perhaps, be prepared to risk it in
a Flight Simulator though, providing I had a stiff whisky and a sandwich by
my side, and a couple of attractive (non PC) nurses to fan my brow
afterwards :-)


Actually, even a loop can be low G when executed correctly. I've met and
spoke with on a number of occasions an ex-test pilot for the Boeing
MD-NOTAR Helicopters. The test pilots would have informal contests with
one another to see who could pull off the lowest G's while looping their
helicopters. He could keep the max + G forces below 1.5, and supposably
the other pilot could keep it below 1 G.

The key is forward momentum combined with making the loop more oval then
round. Keep your airspeed high (well above maneuvering speed), start a
shallow climb and slowing increase the angle of climb until you reach
the point at which you are nearly at the top of the loop. Since the
airspeed is nearly at the stall speed now, you can pull back on the yoke
more sharply with significantly increasing the G-load. Bring the bird
over the top and then come out of the loop slow and gradual.

As long as you keep + G-forces on an airplane, it doesn't know if it's
upside down or right side up. Think about the G force a 747 has to
endure when it hits severe turbulence at 450kts at 33,000. Those birds
can handle a lot.

A quick search on google found this dumbed down explanation of why it's
probably not a good idea to roll or loop a 747:

http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a1_262.html

Here's the great video of the 707 doing a roll as part of an impromptu
promotional scheme:

http://www.alexisparkinn.com/photoga...707%20Roll.mpg

Now why not go try looping and rolling the 747 or 777 in FS2004? Can't
hurt! Maybe start on the ground and then use the Map mode to give
yourself a lot of altitude (but not too much because you want good air
density) - Say, 18,000' and 300 kts.

Best,

Randy
  #8  
Old March 10th 04, 12:44 AM
John Doe
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Randy Wentzel wrote

snip

A quick search on google found this dumbed down explanation of why it's
probably not a good idea to roll or loop a 747:

http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a1_262.html

Here's the great video of the 707 doing a roll as part of an impromptu
promotional scheme:

http://www.alexisparkinn.com/photoga...707%20Roll.mpg


Thanks. I am enjoying most of them.

Now why not go try looping and rolling the 747 or 777 in FS2004? Can't
hurt!


And please make a video of it.










Maybe start on the ground and then use the Map mode to give
yourself a lot of altitude (but not too much because you want good air
density) - Say, 18,000' and 300 kts.

Best,

Randy


  #9  
Old March 10th 04, 01:53 AM
Randy Wentzel
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And please make a video of it.

OK! So I went ahead and looped the stock MS2004 747 above Travis AFB in
California, which is about 50 miles east of where I live. The video is
saved within FS2004, but I don't know how to pass it on. Do I need a
third-party utility?

Thanks,

Randy
  #10  
Old March 10th 04, 09:06 AM
John Doe
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Randy Wentzel wrote

And please make a video of it.


OK! So I went ahead and looped the stock MS2004 747 above Travis AFB in
California, which is about 50 miles east of where I live. The video is
saved within FS2004, but I don't know how to pass it on. Do I need a
third-party utility?


Apparently, recordings are saved as "FSR" files in your My Documents
folder.

There are a bunch of ways to offer it on the Internet. For example, you can
post that binary file to (alt.binaries) on Usenet.

Others might know better.
 




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