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O2 and



 
 
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  #11  
Old May 20th 17, 01:49 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Duster
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Posts: 161
Default O2 and

Mr. Cloud,
17,500 ft alt all day and no ill effects? I made a similar claim in a shorter altitude chamber run once, but was convinced otherwise after the tech showed me the acuity test results.

ATC audio of a pilot at a higher altitude.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XGdYb2J6Wbk


"Unable to control altitude
Unable to control airspeed
Unable to control heading
Other than that, everything A-OK!"

yea, sure
Ads
  #12  
Old May 20th 17, 02:09 AM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
AS
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Posts: 150
Default O2 and

On Friday, May 19, 2017 at 11:20:36 AM UTC-4, quietpilot wrote:
Bouncing off a comment from another thread.

a number of we "not in our 40s anymore" pilots are setting the O2 to kick in at 5000 msl.

O2 is cheap. Clarity of mind at altitude - priceless!


Being in the middle of my 40s myself. I recall spending time periodically in various smoke filled rooms when I was younger before the attacks on tobacco set laws in motion. Although I didn't smoke myself, the 2nd hand effects were noticeable even then. Do people who set their O2 to start at 5kmsl think environmental factors were important or just adjusting to the requirements of age in the interest of safety? I start feeling the need about 12kmsl and set it at 10K

O2 cheap? Perhaps in Hobbs, in the midwest all I get are weird looks. I have had an empty tank for years but would like to take the fiberglass stallion somewhere more dynamic eventually and not have to hunt for 02 once there.

Curiously


Don't skimp on O2! I flew the Sports Class Nats in Parowan a number of years ago in my H301. It had an A8A which needs to be adjusted for altitude manually. Since I had only a small tank for weight reasons, I turned the O2 on and off as I dipped below 12k ft. I made it home w/o problems but when I got out of the ship and pushed the old gal towards the trailer, I developed a splitting headache the likes I never experienced before. I put the glider in the cradle, donned the mask and turned on the O2 to max flow. I emptied the tank by taking deep breaths making sure not to hyper-ventilate. Within a few minutes, the headache was gone and I felt great again.
I can only recommend to take a high altitude physiological training session, aka high altitude chamber ride. I took mine in Dayton, OH but I think this chamber is no longer available.

Uli
'AS'
  #13  
Old May 20th 17, 02:53 PM posted to rec.aviation.soaring
Chris Rollings[_2_]
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Posts: 136
Default O2 and

At 01:09 20 May 2017, AS wrote:
On Friday, May 19, 2017 at 11:20:36 AM UTC-4, quietpilot wrote:
Bouncing off a comment from another thread.
=20
a number of we "not in our 40s anymore" pilots are setting the O2 to

ki=
ck in at 5000 msl. =20
=20
O2 is cheap. Clarity of mind at altitude - priceless!
=20

=20
Being in the middle of my 40s myself. I recall spending time

periodically=
in various smoke filled rooms when I was younger before the attacks on
tob=
acco set laws in motion. Although I didn't smoke myself, the 2nd hand
effec=
ts were noticeable even then. Do people who set their O2 to start at
5kmsl=
think environmental factors were important or just adjusting to the
requir=
ements of age in the interest of safety? I start feeling the need about
12=
kmsl and set it at 10K =20
=20
O2 cheap? Perhaps in Hobbs, in the midwest all I get are weird looks. I

h=
ave had an empty tank for years but would like to take the fiberglass
stall=
ion somewhere more dynamic eventually and not have to hunt for 02 once
ther=
e.
=20
Curiously


Don't skimp on O2! I flew the Sports Class Nats in Parowan a number of
year=
s ago in my H301. It had an A8A which needs to be adjusted for altitude
man=
ually. Since I had only a small tank for weight reasons, I turned the O2
on=
and off as I dipped below 12k ft. I made it home w/o problems but when I
g=
ot out of the ship and pushed the old gal towards the trailer, I

developed
=
a splitting headache the likes I never experienced before. I put the
glider=
in the cradle, donned the mask and turned on the O2 to max flow. I
emptied=
the tank by taking deep breaths making sure not to hyper-ventilate.
Within=
a few minutes, the headache was gone and I felt great again.
I can only recommend to take a high altitude physiological training
session=
, aka high altitude chamber ride. I took mine in Dayton, OH but I think
thi=
s chamber is no longer available.

Uli
'AS'


My teaching is that lack of O2 is similar in its' effect to consumption of
alcohol:

Assuming you're acclimatised to around sea level.
10,000 ft = 1 pint of beer
20,000 ft = 1 bottle of wine
30,000 ft = 1 litre of extra strong (90% alcohol) Polish Vodka.

"Ah." you say, " But the effect of alcohol varies from one idividual to
another and from day to day even within one individual." True, so does the
effect of lack of Oxygen. And no, I've never drunk a litre of extra strong
Polish Vodka in one sesion.

 




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